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An Only Child and Her Sister: A Memoir

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AN ONLY CHILD AND HER SISTER is a compelling true life story. Two sisters born to the same parents but treated so differently; one ended up pregnant and married at thirteen. The other didn’t fare so well. Casey and her little sister, Christine, started off with what looked like a good beginning. But looks can be deceiving. Their mother, Eve Whitney, a stunning Hollywood AN ONLY CHILD AND HER SISTER is a compelling true life story. Two sisters born to the same parents but treated so differently; one ended up pregnant and married at thirteen. The other didn’t fare so well. Casey and her little sister, Christine, started off with what looked like a good beginning. But looks can be deceiving. Their mother, Eve Whitney, a stunning Hollywood beauty, didn’t much care for children. Unfortunately, she had two. Their father, Eddie Maxwell, was a successful songwriter and gag man; he was a brilliant, handsome, hugely charismatic man, but he had a secret drug habit that sent him careening between warm and loving parent one day, to hair-trigger monster the next. If Casey got only sporadic moments of love and caring, Chris got nothing. Neither Eddie nor Eve ever had a kind thought for their youngest child. And so the sisters were forced to find their own paths through this horrific excuse of a childhood, each making choices that pulled them farther and farther apart when the one thing they needed was each other. Told without an ounce of self-pity or bitterness, this story is unique as well as universal. The scenes of pain and incredible neglect live side by side with amazing moments of humor, courage, and triumph.


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AN ONLY CHILD AND HER SISTER is a compelling true life story. Two sisters born to the same parents but treated so differently; one ended up pregnant and married at thirteen. The other didn’t fare so well. Casey and her little sister, Christine, started off with what looked like a good beginning. But looks can be deceiving. Their mother, Eve Whitney, a stunning Hollywood AN ONLY CHILD AND HER SISTER is a compelling true life story. Two sisters born to the same parents but treated so differently; one ended up pregnant and married at thirteen. The other didn’t fare so well. Casey and her little sister, Christine, started off with what looked like a good beginning. But looks can be deceiving. Their mother, Eve Whitney, a stunning Hollywood beauty, didn’t much care for children. Unfortunately, she had two. Their father, Eddie Maxwell, was a successful songwriter and gag man; he was a brilliant, handsome, hugely charismatic man, but he had a secret drug habit that sent him careening between warm and loving parent one day, to hair-trigger monster the next. If Casey got only sporadic moments of love and caring, Chris got nothing. Neither Eddie nor Eve ever had a kind thought for their youngest child. And so the sisters were forced to find their own paths through this horrific excuse of a childhood, each making choices that pulled them farther and farther apart when the one thing they needed was each other. Told without an ounce of self-pity or bitterness, this story is unique as well as universal. The scenes of pain and incredible neglect live side by side with amazing moments of humor, courage, and triumph.

30 review for An Only Child and Her Sister: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    An unexpected, obscure gem of a personal memoir found on Kindle Unlimited. Wish it used the audiobook cover, which is more attention-grabbing than this one. I went by this one a few times before I decided to give the sample a shot, and I'm glad I did. Her mom was a minor starlet at MGM, her dad a songwriter who worked with Desi Arnez, but Maxwell Clair's early life was hardly glamorous. This is a touch of Old Hollywood meets narcissistic, nightmare parents in the 1950s/60s... and a fascinating po An unexpected, obscure gem of a personal memoir found on Kindle Unlimited. Wish it used the audiobook cover, which is more attention-grabbing than this one. I went by this one a few times before I decided to give the sample a shot, and I'm glad I did. Her mom was a minor starlet at MGM, her dad a songwriter who worked with Desi Arnez, but Maxwell Clair's early life was hardly glamorous. This is a touch of Old Hollywood meets narcissistic, nightmare parents in the 1950s/60s... and a fascinating portrait of a woman who came up in a strange, abusive childhood, ended up a teenage mother, but still made something of herself. Finished high school, left an abusive marriage, got her first job and took off from there. She worked at multiple studios, and eventually was a staff writer for shows like Step by Step--all while maintaining a lifelong relationship with both n-parents. There's a lot of emotional nuance here from a daughter who acknowledges what her parents were, but still loved them, and managed a rocky but consistent relationship with them. Oh and of course: she had a little sister, but her parents were so neglectful and abusive toward her, she ended up on a very different path from Casey. Casey chronicles those two divergent paths, and her own guilt about aspects of their childhood. The book is well-written and compelling all the way through. The only place I found it slightly thin, though understandably so, was where her now-adult children were concerned--I was mildly curious what their perspective was, re: their mother and grandparents, but hey, that's me asking a lot. If you're interested in minor Hollywood figures, life in LA/Hollywood for Boomer kids in the 1950s/60s, or just in narcissistic parents (the super selfish/neglectful kind rather than, say, physically abusive and sociopathic type) and overcoming that parenting style--this is an interesting memoir.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda DiMeo Lowman

    Abandoned. I was about halfway through and I wanted something different to happen. I had a good idea about what the father and mother were like and how they treated her. There was too much of that and not much about her sister Chris (actually little mention of her) and the favorite daughter (the narrator of the story) does not think about her much and rarely does the reader know how she feels about the sister and their long separation. The overall rating for this book is 4.4 from 273 readers. Th Abandoned. I was about halfway through and I wanted something different to happen. I had a good idea about what the father and mother were like and how they treated her. There was too much of that and not much about her sister Chris (actually little mention of her) and the favorite daughter (the narrator of the story) does not think about her much and rarely does the reader know how she feels about the sister and their long separation. The overall rating for this book is 4.4 from 273 readers. The rating surprises me. I hate to say this about a book but I got bored. I've said many times that I have so many books I want to read and I'm not wasting any time reading a book that I'm not enjoying.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    A story of healing This book was intriguing from the opening line. You wanted to find out what crazy unbelievable thing would happen next in Casey’s life and keep reading as fast as you could. Casey’s honesty about her own role in her adult life is heartbreaking and beautiful. Many who grow up in toxic environments never get that self reflective. Recommend!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan Bazzett-Griffith

    Have read a lot of memoirs on Kindle this year, and this was one of the better ones, as Casey Maxwell Clair not only led a truly traumatic and unconventional life with her Hollywood parents, but as an adult, Casey is a pretty good writer. I liked her conversational style and how she is able to look back at her early life, as well as the early lives of her parents and her sister, with the benefits if hindsight and a remarkable amount of growth. She overcame a lot of odds- a childhood filled with Have read a lot of memoirs on Kindle this year, and this was one of the better ones, as Casey Maxwell Clair not only led a truly traumatic and unconventional life with her Hollywood parents, but as an adult, Casey is a pretty good writer. I liked her conversational style and how she is able to look back at her early life, as well as the early lives of her parents and her sister, with the benefits if hindsight and a remarkable amount of growth. She overcame a lot of odds- a childhood filled with neglect, poverty, and instability, teenaged motherhood and marriage, and enough dysfunction to fill this book to the brim with crazy stories. I enjoyed this book- 3.5 stars, rounded up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Madalena

    My mom brought me this book as a gift when she returned to Greece from a trip. Once I started reading I could not put it down. A heartbreaking family story told with honesty and attention to detail. The writing was beautiful and the experiences were realistically mediated to the reader. Casey's strength and courage to thrive against all odds is very inspiring. I highly recommend this and will definitely read again! My mom brought me this book as a gift when she returned to Greece from a trip. Once I started reading I could not put it down. A heartbreaking family story told with honesty and attention to detail. The writing was beautiful and the experiences were realistically mediated to the reader. Casey's strength and courage to thrive against all odds is very inspiring. I highly recommend this and will definitely read again!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sue Terlak

    Terrific book. The author style is very easy to read. What she went through as a child and still managed to have a very fulfilled life is remarkable. She is not bitter always chose to make the most our of some very bad situations. Its also a great family story about forgiveness and just accepting the faults of your family that you cannot change.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Robison

    Wow. What a heartbreaking story of how hard it can be to make lemonade out of rotten lemons. Such an amazing reminder of how important it is to show others love and light.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Victor *I was in the pool!*

    What a remarkable heart wrenching story. A rollercoaster of crying and laughing then laughing while crying. Casey and especially Chris are going to stay with me for a long time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    SundayAtDusk

    From the book description, it sounded like this might be a harrowing tale, but Casey Clair wrote it in a way that kept it from being so. It was very interesting, not overwhelming, from start to finish. Obviously, Ms. Clair kept her readers in mind, and didn’t write the type of contemporary memoir where the reader is totally disregarded; where the author just goes on and on about things exactly how she or he wants to, as if writing in a private diary. Possibly her background in sitcom writing mad From the book description, it sounded like this might be a harrowing tale, but Casey Clair wrote it in a way that kept it from being so. It was very interesting, not overwhelming, from start to finish. Obviously, Ms. Clair kept her readers in mind, and didn’t write the type of contemporary memoir where the reader is totally disregarded; where the author just goes on and on about things exactly how she or he wants to, as if writing in a private diary. Possibly her background in sitcom writing made her keep thinking about her reading audience, not thinking strictly about herself. Casey Clair and her sister Christine were blessed with show biz parents who would soon be on their way down. Her mother, an actress/model, realized she would have to get a regular type job and wealthy boyfriends, while her father appeared to believe it was show business or no business. After their divorce, he would spend days writing scripts and days strung out on pills. The author would live with him part of the time, until he decided she needed her mother more at her age, and then lived with her mother and sister full-time again. (Oh, there was also a stint in a Catholic boarding school, as well as weird summers with strangers, which sounded like the real horrors of it all.) Christine unfortunately was seen as “bad luck” by her father at an early age, and he pretty much ignored her for most of her life. The author still has guilt to this day about her sister’s life, which she should not. She was not responsible for her father or mother's behavior nor her sister’s later drug addiction. Their mother was narcissistic, a non-existent cook and housekeeper, a non-existent day-to-day mother in general; but she still provided more to the girls than their father, as well as giving living money to their father. Ms. Clair would only learn about that financial support much later in life, when she realized her childhood memories of her father were somewhat idolatry in nature, and she had demonized her mother. Unlike other memoirs, when the author’s childhood ends, this book doesn’t take a nosedive where captivation was concerned. That was good, too, since her childhood ended in her early teens, when she had a shotgun wedding and a baby girl. The marriage did not last, but, like so many other young mothers, her baby; plus a second daughter born ten years later; provided her with motivation to go forward with school and later pretty impressive jobs. Christine, on the other hand, would end up having four kids, and a terrible drug addiction she could not kick. The author couldn’t help but wonder if she came out okay because her father loved her, when Christine had no one who loved her as a child. I think not, because lies about love have been shown to be more psychologically destructive than lack of love. Christine did not have to worry about lies, but she got mixed up with a bad group very young, and started drugs very young. If it wasn’t for the drug use, she probably would have reoriented herself, making her own family with her friends and kids. Neither sister had good relationships with men, until Casey Clair met her current husband in her fifties. Good fathering is important, and this is another memoir that shows how important strong fathers are to daughters. Nevertheless, even without a good father or good mother, kids can raise themselves and do very well as adults. The author proved that, her sister sadly did not. It’s all a matter of the choices one makes. That’s why siblings can turn out so different. All parents are needed pathways to a lifetime on earth, and some parents, such as the author’s, are pretty much only that while their children are growing up. They don’t provide the love, attention and care that they should. Sometimes, it’s only after the children have grown up that the parents grow up, too, if they ever grow up at all. It should not be like that, of course, but it is in countless families and always has been.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Casey is a comedy writer, so somehow has the ability to help create some distance for the reader from her tragic childhood. A publicity one-liner says, "Two sisters. One was pregnant and married at 13. The other didn't turn out as well." Casey's unique personality and ability to see the humor helped her survive her mind-numblingly awful, isolated childhood. She was raised (if you can call it that) by two world-class narcissists who provided no food, or candy, for weeks at a time, and never even Casey is a comedy writer, so somehow has the ability to help create some distance for the reader from her tragic childhood. A publicity one-liner says, "Two sisters. One was pregnant and married at 13. The other didn't turn out as well." Casey's unique personality and ability to see the humor helped her survive her mind-numblingly awful, isolated childhood. She was raised (if you can call it that) by two world-class narcissists who provided no food, or candy, for weeks at a time, and never even taught their daughters to brush their teeth! Yet Casey survived, and prevailed. You'll really enjoy her story. A great beach read for people who insist on substance.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    Ya know, some people just shouldn’t have children. They probably shouldn’t have pets, either. They should only be responsible for, say, house plants. Two of these people, Eve Whitney and Eddie Maxwell, were the parents of Casey and Chris Maxwell, daughters born within 18 months apart. Both Hollywood second stringers, Eve was a beautiful woman who met Eddie, a song and gag writer, during WW2. They met and married, had the two daughters and their lives fell apart. Eddie drank himself out of a job Ya know, some people just shouldn’t have children. They probably shouldn’t have pets, either. They should only be responsible for, say, house plants. Two of these people, Eve Whitney and Eddie Maxwell, were the parents of Casey and Chris Maxwell, daughters born within 18 months apart. Both Hollywood second stringers, Eve was a beautiful woman who met Eddie, a song and gag writer, during WW2. They met and married, had the two daughters and their lives fell apart. Eddie drank himself out of a job or two, while Eve left “the Business” after realizing she was t enough of an actress to sustain a serious career. After they separated, neither parent took day to day responsibility for the girls. Bouncing between two parents, the girls basically took care of themselves and tried to take care of each other. Both girls ran wild before their 12th birthdays and Casey, the older, wound up pregnant and married at the age of 14. Chris lost her life, toothless and aged in her late 40s, after years of drinking and drugging. Casey was lucky to find excellent jobs behind the scenes in the movie industry. Casey Maxwell Clair’s memoir is called, “An Only Child and her Sister”, and Clair sticks pretty close to her title. She’s a survivor and the book tells her story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Frazer

    A beautifully sad story with a special ending I lived this book. I basically couldn't put it down. There were so many similarities to my life but in the end, a hard hitting read that pulls at your heart. How can one sister be loved and the other not? I think I'll ask my non loving mother when I see her next. A beautifully sad story with a special ending I lived this book. I basically couldn't put it down. There were so many similarities to my life but in the end, a hard hitting read that pulls at your heart. How can one sister be loved and the other not? I think I'll ask my non loving mother when I see her next.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becky McGlone

    Great story! Well written. I was shocked, angry, sad , confused and my mouth dropped a few times reading this. I was surprised with some of the real life people mentioned in this book. I applaud Casey dealing with life as well as she did considering the circumstances taking place! I despised her mother from the beginning ! I felt bad for her sister. Emotions ran deep.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth Brookshire

    Outstanding This has to be one of the best memoirs I've read all year! And I even sampled it before and turned it down. Such intimate writing and beautiful memories. Thank you, Casey for writing this book. You will not be disappointed. Read it!!! Outstanding This has to be one of the best memoirs I've read all year! And I even sampled it before and turned it down. Such intimate writing and beautiful memories. Thank you, Casey for writing this book. You will not be disappointed. Read it!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Wow!!! I can understand why you had serious self esteem issues. I remember watching Ozzie and Harriet as a child, the Donna Read show,etc etc etc. and wondering where parents like that came from. My mom dressed the way they dressed. She always wore jewelry, dresses, hats, gloves and high heels. Dad went out to work, came home and was the king of the castle and the law of the land. There was no lively dining room table conversation over dinner. Everyone I knew shared my life. Dad watched the tv, an Wow!!! I can understand why you had serious self esteem issues. I remember watching Ozzie and Harriet as a child, the Donna Read show,etc etc etc. and wondering where parents like that came from. My mom dressed the way they dressed. She always wore jewelry, dresses, hats, gloves and high heels. Dad went out to work, came home and was the king of the castle and the law of the land. There was no lively dining room table conversation over dinner. Everyone I knew shared my life. Dad watched the tv, and you watched with him, and when he turned it off, everyone dispersed. I have often told people that in those good old days a parent could literally plant their kid’s body in the back yard and tell everyone that they had gone to visit aunt and uncle so and so in California. No one would ask any questions. People kept to themselves. I’m thanking my lucky stars that I won the lottery in comparison to Casey and Chris. And Casey, people, neighbors, the folks who went to the same church were all, for the most part, tremendously judgmental. How glad I am that you made it through and finally found success and happiness. I was truly holding my breath while cheering you on the whole journey.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Norma Endersby

    This was my second book in as many days that told a true story about a child who suffered through an abominable childhood. I am speechless, wondering what's wrong with a world that allows these kinds of things to happen to small, defenseless children. For each of these stories that end in happy, fulfilling lives, there have to be countless others that didn't ... what allows one to survive and not the other? These lives of quiet desperation fill my heart with such sadness as I see small moments th This was my second book in as many days that told a true story about a child who suffered through an abominable childhood. I am speechless, wondering what's wrong with a world that allows these kinds of things to happen to small, defenseless children. For each of these stories that end in happy, fulfilling lives, there have to be countless others that didn't ... what allows one to survive and not the other? These lives of quiet desperation fill my heart with such sadness as I see small moments that were mirrored in my life. I didn't have a perfect childhood and I had to endure some taunting, bullying and more than a few episodes where poor self-esteem took over common sense. Compared to these children, my childhood was perfect.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura Anderson

    So Familiar! I laughed and I for reading this book. I also came from a very dysfunctional family and recognized, and related to so much of what Mrs. Casey Clair Beaumont wrote. In spite of our common, horrific backgrounds, I developed a penitent for humor as well, not wanting to have people laugh with me rather than at me. She's made it beyond the point of recognizing her own self destructive tendencies regarding relationships to the breakthrough of seeing her own worth, appreciating the struggle So Familiar! I laughed and I for reading this book. I also came from a very dysfunctional family and recognized, and related to so much of what Mrs. Casey Clair Beaumont wrote. In spite of our common, horrific backgrounds, I developed a penitent for humor as well, not wanting to have people laugh with me rather than at me. She's made it beyond the point of recognizing her own self destructive tendencies regarding relationships to the breakthrough of seeing her own worth, appreciating the struggle it took to survive and going forward to thrive! Now, I have to find her first book to find out how she did it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    I've been reading a lot of memoirs lately as I get ready to write one, and this one is pretty different in perspective than many other popular memoirs with similar themes. This memoir is written from an adult perspective, meaning that many things that are left for the reader to think/assume in books such as The Glass Castle or Educated are said outright in this book. The author calls abuse, neglect, stalking, and other bad parenting by its name rather than only presenting it through the lens of I've been reading a lot of memoirs lately as I get ready to write one, and this one is pretty different in perspective than many other popular memoirs with similar themes. This memoir is written from an adult perspective, meaning that many things that are left for the reader to think/assume in books such as The Glass Castle or Educated are said outright in this book. The author calls abuse, neglect, stalking, and other bad parenting by its name rather than only presenting it through the lens of her past naïve self. This memoir was interesting, sad, scary, funny, and joyful at times. It evoked an amount of emotion that is appropriate for the story that is being told. In addition to all of this, the memoir itself had a powerful message about healing from past trauma, without having a glorified "happy ending." She makes it clear that healing is a life-long process, and she's working hard to enjoy the life she's living and to love herself. I'm glad this story was shared with me. Thank you Casey!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marti Healy

    A very compelling book. It's hard to read through the challenges and abandonment that Casey endured growing up, but the writing it very uplifting. Just when you want to cry, the author tilts it on it's head with her warm humor. She is a delight, and readers will fall in love with her on the very first page. I was fortunate enough to attend a "virtual" interaction with her and many other readers about this book - and she is as delightful "in person" as she is in the book. I highly recommend it fo A very compelling book. It's hard to read through the challenges and abandonment that Casey endured growing up, but the writing it very uplifting. Just when you want to cry, the author tilts it on it's head with her warm humor. She is a delight, and readers will fall in love with her on the very first page. I was fortunate enough to attend a "virtual" interaction with her and many other readers about this book - and she is as delightful "in person" as she is in the book. I highly recommend it for anyone who may have faced a difficult childhood - or who simply wants a good read – with a charming peek into a very intriguing life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Iven

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ One of the best memoirs I have read. From the start, Casey’s story had me hooked. How two sisters from the same family can grow up so differently from each other. This book definitely had me in tears at some times as well as shocked at others. Casey’s life was a true “started from the bottom. “ she started with nothing and even though she failed, she still got right back up and tried harder to make something out of her life. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A definite recommendation if you’re looking for a g ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ One of the best memoirs I have read. From the start, Casey’s story had me hooked. How two sisters from the same family can grow up so differently from each other. This book definitely had me in tears at some times as well as shocked at others. Casey’s life was a true “started from the bottom. “ she started with nothing and even though she failed, she still got right back up and tried harder to make something out of her life. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A definite recommendation if you’re looking for a great memoir to read! Learn about the life of Casey Maxwell Clair and what truest she has become.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Korb

    What a Courageous Lady from Childhood to a Victorious Adulthood This memoir highlights how parents have an enormous impact on their children without even knowing it. It shows how much children depend on their parents to feel safe and to develop their own identity. Famous parents or not, Casey's parents represent many parents that are so self-absorbed, they are abusive and negligent. Because Casey always had hope and faith in better circumstances, she was able to finally get what she has always lo What a Courageous Lady from Childhood to a Victorious Adulthood This memoir highlights how parents have an enormous impact on their children without even knowing it. It shows how much children depend on their parents to feel safe and to develop their own identity. Famous parents or not, Casey's parents represent many parents that are so self-absorbed, they are abusive and negligent. Because Casey always had hope and faith in better circumstances, she was able to finally get what she has always longed for despite her flawed parents. Unfortunately, her sister never had a chance.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Irene McNamara

    Sad and yet uplifting and hopeful. Parts remind me of my own upbringing with my sister. We were not so ignored as Casey and her sister but we’re still divided, with my Mother always saying she was the smart one and I was the pretty one. Not a good way to talk to children. I was well into my 20’s before I realized I was smart. I’m not sure if my sister ever realized she was pretty. She always dressed manly and never worked at her appearance. I was told to hurry up and get married while I still ha Sad and yet uplifting and hopeful. Parts remind me of my own upbringing with my sister. We were not so ignored as Casey and her sister but we’re still divided, with my Mother always saying she was the smart one and I was the pretty one. Not a good way to talk to children. I was well into my 20’s before I realized I was smart. I’m not sure if my sister ever realized she was pretty. She always dressed manly and never worked at her appearance. I was told to hurry up and get married while I still had my looks. I’ve been very conscious of that division while raising my girls, always striving to not divide them. Thanks for writing this book Casey!!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    I usually do not read memoirs, but I could not put this one down. The author describes her highly unusual life with unflinching honesty, and left this reader sobbing. The title is so apt given that the author has a sister, just fifteen months her junior, but the girls are treated so differently. If you hear the word narcissist, and think it is merely a fashionable diagnosis, read how these girls were (barely) parented by not one but two narcissists. Neither child is loved or well-cared for. The I usually do not read memoirs, but I could not put this one down. The author describes her highly unusual life with unflinching honesty, and left this reader sobbing. The title is so apt given that the author has a sister, just fifteen months her junior, but the girls are treated so differently. If you hear the word narcissist, and think it is merely a fashionable diagnosis, read how these girls were (barely) parented by not one but two narcissists. Neither child is loved or well-cared for. The younger sister begins self medicating with illegal drugs before she turns eleven. Her older sister is pregnant and married at thirteen, and a mother at fourteen. At times the book was very difficult to read. It is hard to believe that no one intervened to help these girls. The author has had a brilliant career, as did her parents. With love and support, I wonder how much more she would have done.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jolie Gerding

    Famtastic Read!!! I could hardly put this book down. The true life story of tge author is so beautifully written, you can feel the emotions leap off of the page and can so easily relate. There is no "poor pitiful me" here! Casey Clair takes full, if not Too much, responsibility for the turns her life took. This just makes it that much more honest and relatable. Great work! Highky recommended. Famtastic Read!!! I could hardly put this book down. The true life story of tge author is so beautifully written, you can feel the emotions leap off of the page and can so easily relate. There is no "poor pitiful me" here! Casey Clair takes full, if not Too much, responsibility for the turns her life took. This just makes it that much more honest and relatable. Great work! Highky recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Metcalf

    Wow! I couldn't put this book down. This book was heart wrenching from beginning to end. I read it in one day. These "sisters" grew up in such dysfunction I'm surprised they lived passed childhood. Children should never starve for attention from their parents. This book made me tear up several times but it also made me so thankful for the relationship that I have with my parents and siblings. Wow! I couldn't put this book down. This book was heart wrenching from beginning to end. I read it in one day. These "sisters" grew up in such dysfunction I'm surprised they lived passed childhood. Children should never starve for attention from their parents. This book made me tear up several times but it also made me so thankful for the relationship that I have with my parents and siblings.

  26. 4 out of 5

    colleen

    Page turner I absolutely loved this book, I read it in two days. This was a book recommended by Amazon. I love to read memoirs. This book was about two children being brought up by two incredibly fascinating parents that were talented, famous, and narcissistic. It was a heart wrenching tail about two girls who were neglected beyond belief. It was also a beautiful story of survival and forgiveness.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tina Rakowski

    This would be a great book for anyone who felt their parents loved their sibling more than them and for someone whose parents loved them more than their sibling and felt guilty but lavished in the favortism at the same time. However, the abuse in this book is more mental and emotional than physical. The mom was 'Mommy Dearest' minus the OCD and the dad was 'Clark Gable' with a drug addiction. This book is a bundle of emotions from the start until the finish. This would be a great book for anyone who felt their parents loved their sibling more than them and for someone whose parents loved them more than their sibling and felt guilty but lavished in the favortism at the same time. However, the abuse in this book is more mental and emotional than physical. The mom was 'Mommy Dearest' minus the OCD and the dad was 'Clark Gable' with a drug addiction. This book is a bundle of emotions from the start until the finish.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie Hawley

    Heartbreaking life of two beautiful girls that deserved so much better. As a mother of 4, I cannot imagine throwing my children aside, ignore, locking them out in the rain, to go have “me time”. Casey is right SHES grew up with the worst kind of narcissistic parents. Psychological abuse is the hardest to overcome, I commend her for all she has done to take a better path. Very good read and eye opening.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aimee L. Maisner

    Poignant This book was wonderful to read. It draws you in from the first sentence and keeps you spellbound until the last word. It’s, poignant, sad, a little funny, a true story like no other. Casey Maxwell Clair is a great author, this her story and she tells it as no one else could.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Smith

    I typically stay away from memoirs, and I very seldom read them if I've never heard of the person. However, this book was recommended by my librarian. I'm so glad I decided to read it. Wow. Just when you think you have had to overcome a lot, there is Casey to devastatingly one-up you. The utter disbelief I had at certain parts of the story. The sadness. The anger. The humor. The light at the end of the tunnel. I'm so glad to see Casey's life turned out very well. I typically stay away from memoirs, and I very seldom read them if I've never heard of the person. However, this book was recommended by my librarian. I'm so glad I decided to read it. Wow. Just when you think you have had to overcome a lot, there is Casey to devastatingly one-up you. The utter disbelief I had at certain parts of the story. The sadness. The anger. The humor. The light at the end of the tunnel. I'm so glad to see Casey's life turned out very well.

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