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Ego Free Leadership: Ending the Unconscious Habits that Hijack Your Business

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2017 Silver Nautilus Winner 2018 Indie Book Award Finalist  ​ Take your ego out of the equation, and watch your company thrive! “I’ve got a solution,” Encore’s CFO tells Brandon, “but it’s unorthodox.” It’s 2005 and Brandon Black has just been promoted to CEO of Encore Capital, a company struggling to navigate an increasingly difficult business environment. Faced with a rap 2017 Silver Nautilus Winner 2018 Indie Book Award Finalist  ​ Take your ego out of the equation, and watch your company thrive! “I’ve got a solution,” Encore’s CFO tells Brandon, “but it’s unorthodox.” It’s 2005 and Brandon Black has just been promoted to CEO of Encore Capital, a company struggling to navigate an increasingly difficult business environment. Faced with a rapidly declining stock price and low workplace morale, Brandon knows he needs change—and fast. Following his CFO’s advice, he and his executive team start working with Learning as Leadership (LaL) and its president, Shayne Hughes. Through their partnership, Encore’s executive team learns to root out the unproductive ego habits that undermine collaboration and performance.  As they instill these more effective behaviors throughout the organization, Encore begins to solve problems collectively, prioritize resources without infighting, and focus on the initiatives with the greatest strategic value. When the financial crisis of 2008–09 forces 90 percent of its competitors out of business, Encore thrives, with its profits increasing by 300 percent and its stock price by 1200 percent. Told from two lively first-person perspectives, Ego Free Leadership brings readers along for Encore’s incredible success story. They’ll see a CEO overcome his unconscious resistance to modeling the change he wants in his team and discover a time-tested roadmap for eliminating the destructive effects of the ego in teams and organizations.


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2017 Silver Nautilus Winner 2018 Indie Book Award Finalist  ​ Take your ego out of the equation, and watch your company thrive! “I’ve got a solution,” Encore’s CFO tells Brandon, “but it’s unorthodox.” It’s 2005 and Brandon Black has just been promoted to CEO of Encore Capital, a company struggling to navigate an increasingly difficult business environment. Faced with a rap 2017 Silver Nautilus Winner 2018 Indie Book Award Finalist  ​ Take your ego out of the equation, and watch your company thrive! “I’ve got a solution,” Encore’s CFO tells Brandon, “but it’s unorthodox.” It’s 2005 and Brandon Black has just been promoted to CEO of Encore Capital, a company struggling to navigate an increasingly difficult business environment. Faced with a rapidly declining stock price and low workplace morale, Brandon knows he needs change—and fast. Following his CFO’s advice, he and his executive team start working with Learning as Leadership (LaL) and its president, Shayne Hughes. Through their partnership, Encore’s executive team learns to root out the unproductive ego habits that undermine collaboration and performance.  As they instill these more effective behaviors throughout the organization, Encore begins to solve problems collectively, prioritize resources without infighting, and focus on the initiatives with the greatest strategic value. When the financial crisis of 2008–09 forces 90 percent of its competitors out of business, Encore thrives, with its profits increasing by 300 percent and its stock price by 1200 percent. Told from two lively first-person perspectives, Ego Free Leadership brings readers along for Encore’s incredible success story. They’ll see a CEO overcome his unconscious resistance to modeling the change he wants in his team and discover a time-tested roadmap for eliminating the destructive effects of the ego in teams and organizations.

30 review for Ego Free Leadership: Ending the Unconscious Habits that Hijack Your Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    I don't normally select business books from Netgalley, but this book caught my eye and the title resonated with me for a number of reasons. As a fairly new director in a small charity (not-for-profit), I couldn't understand why there was such a huge sense of privilege and ego within the organisation, especially when the organisation was set up to serve people who are marginalised and in need of support. Through reading this book I have come to understand how the self-worth and ego of individual I don't normally select business books from Netgalley, but this book caught my eye and the title resonated with me for a number of reasons. As a fairly new director in a small charity (not-for-profit), I couldn't understand why there was such a huge sense of privilege and ego within the organisation, especially when the organisation was set up to serve people who are marginalised and in need of support. Through reading this book I have come to understand how the self-worth and ego of individual leaders can influence the ethos and working environment of an organisation, and ultimately affect performance levels and productivity. I also thought that this book would help me look at my own leadership and help me to develop my own self awareness and understand the context in which I am working. And it did. This is an excellent book for anybody who wants to develop a sense of self awareness in the business place and who wants to find ways of developing constructive communication and clarity of purpose in their work. One of the things that I believe that I should do as a leader, is to lead by example. I think the stories in this book and the case studies showing different situations and how they were addressed, are a phenomenal example of how we can improve the way we work and our work place environment by leading through example. I think for me this book is also about how we can empower ourselves and empower others to address the challenges of the 21st century workplace. The book shows that it is profitable for business leaders to become more self-aware in the workplace because they then set the example and the context for others. This then builds up trust in the workplace, strengthens team relationships and also encourages creativity and collaboration. I think this is vital for businesses, charities and other organisations because it encourages innovation. I particularly liked the section which illustrates the benefits of 'making others good' and the parts of the book that recognise that there is often more than one way of seeing things and that a certain situation can have more than one interpretation. The book illustrated this principle with a helpful diagram which I think cleverly and clearly illustrated the point in a helpful way. The book engages with the many different challenges of leadership and the need to lead people effectively, honestly and in a way that enables human flourishing. The book doesn't underplay the complexity of the issues and shows that there are no easy answers to these questions but the one thing that we do need to model is an enquiring and learning disposition. We need to be willing to be open to new ideas and find ways of listening even when we feel uncomfortable and this is a challenge. The need for active listening and reflection was also emphasised but not in an obvious way. The case studies show how vital it is to listen without being defensive and also how valuable constructive mentoring and peer to peer support can be. Another key point of learning is the need for our workplaces to be places of safety. They should be places where people feel that they can make constructive criticism and suggestions and how such a workplace can help leaders overcome our blindspots because we don't know everything and we don't see everything. There were just so many points of learning for me which I have gained from reading this book and it is a source of real wisdom and something that I can turn to for practical guidance. I think this is a valuable book and it was also very engaging and easy to read. It is written in such a way that you feel as if you're actually participating in the dialogue and in this way the book actually becomes a very valid and very valuable conversation partner. It is a must read for anyone who wants to improve their leadership, both in the workplace and in the home. Copy Provided by Greenleaf Book Group Press via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christin.P

    *Received a digital copy for an honest review* Blaming, avoiding, over-controlling, assuming ill intent – in the workplace, our egos wear many masks to cover our need to be right or our fear of failure. Unsurprisingly, behaviors based on stress and anxiety often lead to politics and power struggles across the ranks and create the exact opposite of what employees want to come to work to: a culture that’s supportive, transparent, authentic collaborative, and trusting. In their book Ego Free Leaders *Received a digital copy for an honest review* Blaming, avoiding, over-controlling, assuming ill intent – in the workplace, our egos wear many masks to cover our need to be right or our fear of failure. Unsurprisingly, behaviors based on stress and anxiety often lead to politics and power struggles across the ranks and create the exact opposite of what employees want to come to work to: a culture that’s supportive, transparent, authentic collaborative, and trusting. In their book Ego Free Leadership, Brandon Black (former CEO of Encore Capital) and Shayne Hughes (president of Learning as Leadership) tell the story of their 9-year-long collaboration which completely transformed the corporate culture at Encore Capital, and consequently turned it into a highly profitable public company when many competitors in the North American debt collection industry had a tough time maneuvering through the years 2008 – 2013. However, don’t be fooled into thinking that this book is just another picture-perfect story of the American dream. It’s not, and that’s largely because Brandon Black is surprisingly upfront about the many personal ego struggles and challenges he had to overcome to create a workplace that continuously motivates people and instills a sense of pride in what they are doing. Add to that Shayne’s analyses of key dysfunctional behaviors displayed by Encore Capital’s executive team (argumentative or defensive much?), and you begin to understand that controlling our egos is key to resolving any interpersonal conflict we experience at work or at home. Be warned though: If you are looking for a bite-size and easy-to-digest version of the latest Top 10 Do’s and Don’ts of Great Leadership, you will be disappointed. Ego Free Leadership’s 200 pages are not a quick read for most people, and you might not want to immerse yourself in someone else’s highly subjective and emotional decade-long journey when all you’re after is concise, to-the-point advice on the go. However, I believe that the detailed telling (and analysis) of Encore Capital’s story is exactly what gives the book its value: If you want to fix a systemic issue such as poor corporate culture in your organization, you need to understand the whole picture. Looking only at fragments of it or applying someone’s generic Top 10 suggestions won’t cut it. So, no key points summary here. Instead, feel encouraged to read the book yourself – whatever lessons are applicable to your workplace, you’ll learn.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Candace Talmadge

    There is just one problem with this book. The very people who need most to read and heed it are least likely ever to pick it up. Ego Free Leadership does an outstanding job of telling the story of how a business in an industry with an unsavory reputation become a place where employees were inspired to do their jobs and loved to come into the office. It started at the top, with a CEO who was willing to confront his personal limitations and change. And just as the brown stuff flows downhill, so do There is just one problem with this book. The very people who need most to read and heed it are least likely ever to pick it up. Ego Free Leadership does an outstanding job of telling the story of how a business in an industry with an unsavory reputation become a place where employees were inspired to do their jobs and loved to come into the office. It started at the top, with a CEO who was willing to confront his personal limitations and change. And just as the brown stuff flows downhill, so does the good stuff that came out of this personal transformation. The narrative is simple and compelling, weaving the CEO’s viewpoint and that of his coach along with two members of the company’s executive team. This isn’t like other business books, either full of corporate-speak and bluster or some gimmick that promises instant and easy success. Instead, this is about one person who became the change he wished to see in the world. Kudos to the authors. It’s better than a good read. It’s a great read. Full disclosure: I know about this book because I was paid to read a portion of it and write two articles for the authors a while back. But they did not pay me for the time it took me to complete this book and write this review. That was on my own time and I’m delighted I did it. This book even fearlessly tackles politics. Again, not your typical business book at all but desperately needed and extremely enlightening in a very practical way.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matias Myllyrinne

    A sincere growth story with many relatable anecdotes and experiences. While it offers little new per se it delivers a core message of putting your ego in check and the team and purpose before the urge to be right or to be seen as great. It is a rather American perspective on it and some today would hardly find building an international unit such a daunting or strange task. Many of us would not be surprised to find that an Indian workforce can be smart, educated and capable. But it is well intende A sincere growth story with many relatable anecdotes and experiences. While it offers little new per se it delivers a core message of putting your ego in check and the team and purpose before the urge to be right or to be seen as great. It is a rather American perspective on it and some today would hardly find building an international unit such a daunting or strange task. Many of us would not be surprised to find that an Indian workforce can be smart, educated and capable. But it is well intended and you need to cut him some slack. Equally I found it refreshing to have a perspective from an industry that is not considered cool or particularly fun. Seeing how they managed to find a calling as a company in debt collection, is ... well, refreshing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nasos Kladakis

    4.5 starts for a really good book. It felt really relevant to my ego-related challenges and the examples matched various job environments I have been in the past. A lot of meaningful actionable advice too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marek Zmyslowski

    Must-read just after Non Violent Communication.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    This book was a reading requirement for a leadership training at work - I didn’t choose to read it. It took me 7 months to get through it, dreading opening it every time I knew I had to finish it. The general concepts presented around leadership self awareness were quite helpful; however, the fundamental pieces of their framework were lost in all of the unnecessary details and self-promotion of the authors’ experience. Every chapter came across as a big “ta-da” / showing off how they seemed to o This book was a reading requirement for a leadership training at work - I didn’t choose to read it. It took me 7 months to get through it, dreading opening it every time I knew I had to finish it. The general concepts presented around leadership self awareness were quite helpful; however, the fundamental pieces of their framework were lost in all of the unnecessary details and self-promotion of the authors’ experience. Every chapter came across as a big “ta-da” / showing off how they seemed to overcome it all. Definitions of and methodology for the leadership practices were convoluted and not intuitive. I am hoping the actual training will be fruitful - the book was painful to get through and inactionable.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tõnu Vahtra

    "In leadership, if you look around and think everyone else is the problem, it means you’re the problem." "The upside business value of decreasing ego within an organization is not incremental, but exponential. It’s the difference between 300 percent growth and bankruptcy." Not sure if Encore is the best example of a "Ego free organization", but this book was definitely refreshingly different. When starting from the criticism first then the book is written in almost a leadership fable format (thos "In leadership, if you look around and think everyone else is the problem, it means you’re the problem." "The upside business value of decreasing ego within an organization is not incremental, but exponential. It’s the difference between 300 percent growth and bankruptcy." Not sure if Encore is the best example of a "Ego free organization", but this book was definitely refreshingly different. When starting from the criticism first then the book is written in almost a leadership fable format (those who have read Lencioni's books will know what I mean) and the journey towards ego free leadership sounded a bit too simple and straightforward to be believable, I think there were also other forces in play with Encore Capital Group transoformation which were not sufficiently represented here (or there are still issues creeping underneath that are not admitted in this book). At times the book also felt like a testimonial and praise to Learning as Leadership consultancy company. Now on the positive side, If you disconnect the story from the valuable insights it becomes a very powerful book. I have recently read also other books on the topic of ego (i.e. Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday), it is complex multi-faceted topic and it's difficult to extract practical situational intelligence and understanding about cause&effect dynamics - this book seems to have done it. I could relate to many of the situations described in the book and believe that ego clashes and inability to look at the bigger picture or do what is best for the organization as a whole due to ego are among the biggest issues for maximizing effectiveness and employee engagement in an organization. Solving those issues also involve changing the underlying organizational culture which takes years of strong commitment from senior management and all related parties. Eventually it's a matter of balance as without conflict of interests there is no progress and complacency takes over, such companies will not strive with changing market conditions. - Our ego drives behaviors that causes dysfunctional work environments. If we can rid ourselves of these behaviors we can create better performing teams and happier employees. - When we’re absorbed by our self-worth we miss opportunities to grow and learn, and we keep people down instead of lifting them up. - The key to avoid these behaviors is to learn to recognize when your ego driver gets triggered and try to identify what kind of threat to your self-worth it signifies. - Self-awareness is the highest act of leadership "Every time we react to an email, or vent about that other department, or judge silently in our mind, we perpetuate a context of egosystem behaviors. Every time we castigate people on the other side of an issue, we help ensure the gridlock continues." "When leaders are defensive, territorial, artificially polite, competitive, or abrasive, it tends to trigger similarly dysfunctional behaviors in their colleagues. It doesn’t matter what poster you put up on the wall. Dominant organizational dysfunction will not decrease until individual leaders identify and overcome their personal egosystem reactions." "Widespread conflict avoidance, peppered with a few leaders who are abrasive • Us vs. Them dynamics (silos and turf wars, especially in matrix organizations) • Leaders being defensive and guarded about developmental needs (fear of being judged) • Employees being reactive, tactical, and overwhelmed by too much work. Each of these cultural derailers is triggered by self-worth fears. "Our rational mind knows that we should talk about our difficulties, ask a question if we don’t understand, or deliver that difficult message. But more primal emotions of fear and vulnerability prevail. Not acknowledging our difficulties, however, cuts us off from help or mentoring, increasing the likelihood that we’ll underperform. Trying to appear competent actually causes us to learn and grow more slowly and, over time, become less competent." "I saw in a personal and palpable sense how my need to be liked and admired was so strong that I made other people feel the pain I most wanted to avoid. I rejected before being rejected; I judged others when I felt judged. I often went to the point of blaming others for failures I couldn’t acknowledge. It was a moment of great sadness for me." "Sarcasm carries overtones of judgment because it often masks, through mockery, conflict avoidance." "The level of transparency of the most senior leader in any organization directly influences how safe it is for others to open up." “When we leave a job,” Shayne said, “or sever a relationship, we think we’re escaping unwanted circumstances or people. But our internal challenge in that situation just keeps repeating itself. You will leave jobs again and again, with similar consequences, until you face this difficulty differently.” "The feeling of being indispensable and uber-competent while others struggle is candy-heroin for our egosystem." "We glorify tales of individuals making a superhuman effort, not of teams methodically building the foundation for tomorrow’s success." "If you want the politics and turf wars in your organization to stop, it starts with you. Working on yourself is the highest act of leadership."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Per Flitig

    A very honest and inspiring read The lessons in this book resonates with me and I can’t help to draw connections to the similar concepts in Marshall Rosenberg’s Non Violent Communication. I like how the book tells about the different situations and the struggles from both the perspective of the CEO and the coach. The story feels very authentic and honest. Key takeaways - Our ego drives behaviors that causes dysfunctional work environments. If we can rid ourselves of these behaviors we can create be A very honest and inspiring read The lessons in this book resonates with me and I can’t help to draw connections to the similar concepts in Marshall Rosenberg’s Non Violent Communication. I like how the book tells about the different situations and the struggles from both the perspective of the CEO and the coach. The story feels very authentic and honest. Key takeaways - Our ego drives behaviors that causes dysfunctional work environments. If we can rid ourselves of these behaviors we can create better performing teams and happier employees. - When we’re absorbed by our self-worth we miss opportunities to grow and learn, and we keep people down instead of lifting them up. - The key to avoid these behaviors is to learn to recognize when your ego driver gets triggered and try to identify what kind of threat to your self-worth it signifies. - Self-awareness is the highest act of leadership

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lynette

    I think this book covers many great examples of struggles that we have with our egos. Each chapter starts with a story and concludes with a recap and some reflections for Brandon on his journey as CEO. I gave this a five star rating because I could relate 100% to Chapter 7 about Amy and the stories, biases and perceptions that were contributing to Amy's internal glass ceiling. This chapter alone is worth pure gold. If you identify of female gender working period you should read this chapter or at I think this book covers many great examples of struggles that we have with our egos. Each chapter starts with a story and concludes with a recap and some reflections for Brandon on his journey as CEO. I gave this a five star rating because I could relate 100% to Chapter 7 about Amy and the stories, biases and perceptions that were contributing to Amy's internal glass ceiling. This chapter alone is worth pure gold. If you identify of female gender working period you should read this chapter or at least audio book it. Covid 2020 and being a working mom will only make the internal glass ceiling thicker. If you are male and in a position of power/influence you should read it as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olga Kraineva

    I enjoyed this a lot! For a corporate self help book that isn’t a best seller, it’s actually a lot better than many other business books that have gotten a lot of hype. There’s a lot of great nuggets to glean here - breaking down the us v. Them mentality, the unexpected benefits that come with being vulnerable and honest, and my favorite, making people good instead of bad. Brandon’s story was charming and a great case study in what a workforce that cares about its people and customers can achiev I enjoyed this a lot! For a corporate self help book that isn’t a best seller, it’s actually a lot better than many other business books that have gotten a lot of hype. There’s a lot of great nuggets to glean here - breaking down the us v. Them mentality, the unexpected benefits that come with being vulnerable and honest, and my favorite, making people good instead of bad. Brandon’s story was charming and a great case study in what a workforce that cares about its people and customers can achieve. I did find the parts where Shayne is explaining the dynamics behind what was happening to drag a bit hence the docked star, but overall a very worthwhile read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hugh

    Best book I've read all year. It shows how doing the selfless action can be very difficult. It doesn't just say, 'don't be an asshole' but gets into the nitty gritty of workplace and group politics and how to create a culture that can move past these obstacles and function on what actually matters in organizations: solving the issues at hand. I wish this could become required reading in management training classes. I've recommended this book to my previous professors who study/teach human and orga Best book I've read all year. It shows how doing the selfless action can be very difficult. It doesn't just say, 'don't be an asshole' but gets into the nitty gritty of workplace and group politics and how to create a culture that can move past these obstacles and function on what actually matters in organizations: solving the issues at hand. I wish this could become required reading in management training classes. I've recommended this book to my previous professors who study/teach human and organizational development.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Petr Meissner

    How our ego unconsciously negatively affects our perception and actions. How to find when our ego got hurt and step back to understand why to react consciously instead of in defense. How to get more personal connection and understanding through sharing own vulnerabilities. Well illustrated on thoughts, feelings and decisions made by CEO of financial corporation and comments from his coach.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sri Shivananda

    Loved this book! I learned how dropping the ego shield allows us to connect better with everyone around us and allows them to connect much better with us. It also helped me understand the impact of ego on how we behave, how we operate in a team and what addressing ego does to self-development, growth, being a better self and an evolved leader.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Another book I wasn’t so sure about before I started reading it. Again, another not just for leaders. Our ego has a way of getting in front of what we truly want, to have healthy organizations and healthy selves. With work and practice we can recognize when our ego is being pinched, changing how we react in our businesses and to our people. A must read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Volodya

    Just an OK book. Easy read, very light and conversational. There were a few great bits but generally it felt too long for the ideas covered. I like and agree with many concepts, such as watching and studying for ego driven behaviour and being authentic, yet this is not the book I would gift to friends or colleagues.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Mahindru

    If you have to take one thing out of this book then it will be “observing the pitch and not reacting to it”. Everyone has some fears (of being misjudged, being fired, not capable, etc) and ego (to be always right, etc) based on their beliefs (not facts), which makes them to react when something unexpected happens in daily life. Instead of reacting, we should observe that pitch, show empathy, and work along.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    While there are many positive messages in this book, it often descends into a great deal of “touchy-feely” scenarios that can put you off. From the time of the formation of the first large social structures with a decision hierarchy, there have been conflicts in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Then being humans, there will antagonism, hurt feelings and overall emotional unhappiness. These problems can be solved by being more in tune, but generally only partially. It is often the c While there are many positive messages in this book, it often descends into a great deal of “touchy-feely” scenarios that can put you off. From the time of the formation of the first large social structures with a decision hierarchy, there have been conflicts in both the horizontal and vertical directions. Then being humans, there will antagonism, hurt feelings and overall emotional unhappiness. These problems can be solved by being more in tune, but generally only partially. It is often the case that being more sensitive to someone’s feelings simply encourages them to be even more sensitive rather than the desired opposite of being a more effective worker. Therefore, it is also necessary for people to learn that a real or simply perceived slight is not automatically a cause for concern. Often the worker stewing on a slight is what causes the real loss of productivity. This book is largely a combined autobiography of the principals with an emphasis on personal feelings, behaviors and actions considered incorrect, (none of which are sexual in nature or at the level of serious name-calling), eventually leading to their story of the success of their company, Encore Capital. The company acquires the debt of people in financial difficulties and attempts to work out solutions. Despite the many good qualities of the stories, the main problem I have with the book is that it butts up against a fundamental reality. It is impossible to be an effective leader in high level positions without possessing a great deal of ego. Self-confidence is a necessity for people to be able to make decisions and risk failure. One constant of successful people is that they were willing to take the risk of failure and often did so before finally being successful. To take the position of “Ego Free Leadership” is untenable. Furthermore, without some internal conflict, organizations become complacent and are defeated in the marketplace.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A good look at what happens when an organization learns to check thier ego at the door. The interactions between the coaches and Encore employees are examples of what happens when organized stretch themselves. Well worth the read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Somewhat interesting book. Nothing revolutionary, but reminds me of the point that this must always be top of mind. Remember to think about 'pinches' what the book calls an automatic emotional response. Somewhat interesting book. Nothing revolutionary, but reminds me of the point that this must always be top of mind. Remember to think about 'pinches' what the book calls an automatic emotional response.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wenting

    "Every time we react to an email, or vent about that other department, or judge silently in our mind, we perpetuate a context of egosystem behaviors. Every time we castigate people on the other side of an issue, we help ensure the gridlock continues." an excellent book "Every time we react to an email, or vent about that other department, or judge silently in our mind, we perpetuate a context of egosystem behaviors. Every time we castigate people on the other side of an issue, we help ensure the gridlock continues." an excellent book

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joao

    It's a first person story about leadership, addressing our inner fears and insecurities and how we manage to see the other way around. I think this is a must must read for every single future leader. It's a first person story about leadership, addressing our inner fears and insecurities and how we manage to see the other way around. I think this is a must must read for every single future leader.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Turcotte

    Just excellent story telling! I listened to this on Audible and I'm so glad I did! Great to hear from the actual participants. Highly recommend to anyone that...hmmm...works! You don't need to be a CEO or work for a large organization to enjoy this. Just excellent story telling! I listened to this on Audible and I'm so glad I did! Great to hear from the actual participants. Highly recommend to anyone that...hmmm...works! You don't need to be a CEO or work for a large organization to enjoy this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    An excellent book on the importance of vulnerability, empathy, transparency & communication in relation to leadership. Must read for anyone in a leadership role, particularly those who think they don't need to learn about leadership. An excellent book on the importance of vulnerability, empathy, transparency & communication in relation to leadership. Must read for anyone in a leadership role, particularly those who think they don't need to learn about leadership.

  25. 5 out of 5

    V Narayanan

    The best book I read this year so far

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Not only the best leadership book I’ve ever read, but one of the best books, period. A must-read for any executive and company looking to take its performance to the next level. Wow, just wow.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Olinda

    Very Impactful Wow - recognizing pinches that impact my reactions - priceless. This book will help you grow personally and professionally. Highly recommend!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott Anderson

    Very eye-opening book. It really made me re-evaluate my own actions and how I saw myself in the workplace.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Catalano

    Great read with excellent tips on leadership

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Selland

    Not bad, dragged a bit but appreciated the overall message

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