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Children of the Wilderness: New Homes in New Places

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After living off-the-grid in the remote forested wilderness for the past eight years, Vernon, Sylvia and their four young children now begin spending their summers fishing on the shores of Cook Inlet. They were still largely self-sufficient, calling a canvas wall tent their home for three months of the year. Their new enterprise, begun in 1945 with the prospect of Vernon b After living off-the-grid in the remote forested wilderness for the past eight years, Vernon, Sylvia and their four young children now begin spending their summers fishing on the shores of Cook Inlet. They were still largely self-sufficient, calling a canvas wall tent their home for three months of the year. Their new enterprise, begun in 1945 with the prospect of Vernon being drafted to fight in World War II looming over them. Although it brought a new set of challenges and hazards and a great deal of hard work and frustrations, it also brought its own rewards. The next two winters were spent back in their log cabin on Alexander Creek. Then the failing health of Sylvia’s father caused them to make even more changes in their lives. While written for the general public, this book, as well as the others in the series, is also suitable for older children who are interested in how families lived in earlier times and in far different circumstances than their own. They are written in part from the perspective of the children, as well as that of the adults. “[The author] grew up in a world that most people cannot even imagine—it’s a world that we ‘old-timers’ up here sometimes call either ‘the old Alaska’ or ‘the real Alaska.’ And it’s a world that we will unfortunately never see again. Sled dogs, moose meat, fresh trout, log cabins and 7-year-old girls trapping beaver are all part of this delightful, hard-scrabble romp through the wilds of Alaska in the 1940s.” Ron Dalby, former editor of Alaska Magazine and author of Guide to the Alaska Highway and his newest book Pipeline.


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After living off-the-grid in the remote forested wilderness for the past eight years, Vernon, Sylvia and their four young children now begin spending their summers fishing on the shores of Cook Inlet. They were still largely self-sufficient, calling a canvas wall tent their home for three months of the year. Their new enterprise, begun in 1945 with the prospect of Vernon b After living off-the-grid in the remote forested wilderness for the past eight years, Vernon, Sylvia and their four young children now begin spending their summers fishing on the shores of Cook Inlet. They were still largely self-sufficient, calling a canvas wall tent their home for three months of the year. Their new enterprise, begun in 1945 with the prospect of Vernon being drafted to fight in World War II looming over them. Although it brought a new set of challenges and hazards and a great deal of hard work and frustrations, it also brought its own rewards. The next two winters were spent back in their log cabin on Alexander Creek. Then the failing health of Sylvia’s father caused them to make even more changes in their lives. While written for the general public, this book, as well as the others in the series, is also suitable for older children who are interested in how families lived in earlier times and in far different circumstances than their own. They are written in part from the perspective of the children, as well as that of the adults. “[The author] grew up in a world that most people cannot even imagine—it’s a world that we ‘old-timers’ up here sometimes call either ‘the old Alaska’ or ‘the real Alaska.’ And it’s a world that we will unfortunately never see again. Sled dogs, moose meat, fresh trout, log cabins and 7-year-old girls trapping beaver are all part of this delightful, hard-scrabble romp through the wilds of Alaska in the 1940s.” Ron Dalby, former editor of Alaska Magazine and author of Guide to the Alaska Highway and his newest book Pipeline.

30 review for Children of the Wilderness: New Homes in New Places

  1. 4 out of 5

    D

    Its a nice series of books, told simply. Its a plain account, so if you are looking for flowery prose and exaggerated drama; this book is not for you. Its a window into the hardships of life for families, having to 'make do', stretch food supplies over the winter and handle children's illness when a doctor couldn't be afforded. Read the kindle edition. Its a nice series of books, told simply. Its a plain account, so if you are looking for flowery prose and exaggerated drama; this book is not for you. Its a window into the hardships of life for families, having to 'make do', stretch food supplies over the winter and handle children's illness when a doctor couldn't be afforded. Read the kindle edition.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Snider

    Interesting story about a family that never gives up. The author gives interesting insight to the experiences of growing up in Alaska with her parents and siblings. Good read for anyone with an interest in Alaska.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pam Taylor

    Fantastic This is a fantastic series. One book to go and I'll be sad for the journey to end. Truly enjoyed reading them. Fantastic This is a fantastic series. One book to go and I'll be sad for the journey to end. Truly enjoyed reading them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    LL

    Worth reading What a period in history, Interesting glimpse of a lifetime spent surviving in the Alaskan wilderness. A great family history, worth the time reading,

  5. 4 out of 5

    lynn stilley

    Child’s view of living in Alaska Written in quite childish terms, this is the story of growing up in the wilderness of Alaska. It is interesting but ended quite suddenly.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Excellent series

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Sands

    Series is still very good! Already to start the final book. So no time for a long review :-) Would like to thank the author though for sharing these wonderful stories of her family's adventures in Alaska! Series is still very good! Already to start the final book. So no time for a long review :-) Would like to thank the author though for sharing these wonderful stories of her family's adventures in Alaska!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cathy L Rhine

    Waiting for the next book. Awesome family. This is a great series for young folks today. Life without modern technology and cell phones. A young hard working family who shows what can be accomplished with love, patience, and good family values. Your Mom was an amazing woman.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Myra L Rice

    Ross family continued Not quite as interesting as previous books. Hopefully, the fourth book will make up for it. We people in the lower 48 like to know all that happened while living in the wilderness.

  10. 4 out of 5

    gold mining in Alaska

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn A. Olmstead

  12. 5 out of 5

    jeff

  13. 4 out of 5

    teresa earle

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert barnes

  15. 4 out of 5

    Richard Hohnbaum

  16. 5 out of 5

    kristine mattis-graves

  17. 5 out of 5

    anna

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gary Crawford

  19. 4 out of 5

    jane holmes

  20. 4 out of 5

    Barbara arvisais

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ken Walker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Remi P Hitchcock

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sondra Rae Hudson

  24. 5 out of 5

    luellaroslingreen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marti Blattert

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sally Glass

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fred Bond

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Sigler

  30. 4 out of 5

    James Taylor

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