Hot Best Seller

The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck

Availability: Ready to download

Jemima is a domestic duck, whose eggs are routinely confiscated by the farmer's wife because she believes Jemima a poor sitter. Jemima searches for a place away from the farm where she can hatch her eggs without human interference, and naively confides her woes to a suave fox who invites her to nest in a shed at his home. Jemima accepts his invitation, little realising her Jemima is a domestic duck, whose eggs are routinely confiscated by the farmer's wife because she believes Jemima a poor sitter. Jemima searches for a place away from the farm where she can hatch her eggs without human interference, and naively confides her woes to a suave fox who invites her to nest in a shed at his home. Jemima accepts his invitation, little realising her danger. Beatrix Potter indicated the tale was a revision of "Little Red Riding Hood" with Jemima, the fox, and the dog parallels to the fairy tale's heroine, wolf, and woodcutter. Both tales touch upon physical appetite, temptation, and foolish behaviour. The book was hugely popular, and is considered one of her best among critics. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.


Compare

Jemima is a domestic duck, whose eggs are routinely confiscated by the farmer's wife because she believes Jemima a poor sitter. Jemima searches for a place away from the farm where she can hatch her eggs without human interference, and naively confides her woes to a suave fox who invites her to nest in a shed at his home. Jemima accepts his invitation, little realising her Jemima is a domestic duck, whose eggs are routinely confiscated by the farmer's wife because she believes Jemima a poor sitter. Jemima searches for a place away from the farm where she can hatch her eggs without human interference, and naively confides her woes to a suave fox who invites her to nest in a shed at his home. Jemima accepts his invitation, little realising her danger. Beatrix Potter indicated the tale was a revision of "Little Red Riding Hood" with Jemima, the fox, and the dog parallels to the fairy tale's heroine, wolf, and woodcutter. Both tales touch upon physical appetite, temptation, and foolish behaviour. The book was hugely popular, and is considered one of her best among critics. This edition is limited to 1,000 copies.

30 review for The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck

  1. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Orey

    My kid's grandma bought us a 12 book set of the original Beatrix Potter books. I'll be reviewing them at random and out of order. This one... It's pretty classist? Scatterbrained Jemima is desperate to have ducklings but the farmers keep taking her eggs. She waddles into the forest and meets a creepy newspaper-reading fox who convinces her to lay all her eggs at his weird stick house. The house is described with what is now a major swear word, so watch out if you're reading this out loud to kids. My kid's grandma bought us a 12 book set of the original Beatrix Potter books. I'll be reviewing them at random and out of order. This one... It's pretty classist? Scatterbrained Jemima is desperate to have ducklings but the farmers keep taking her eggs. She waddles into the forest and meets a creepy newspaper-reading fox who convinces her to lay all her eggs at his weird stick house. The house is described with what is now a major swear word, so watch out if you're reading this out loud to kids. It absolutely should have been edited out in this edition. Hopefully it was changed for the American version? There's no excuse. Anyway, it all adds up to a generically sexist variation on red riding hood, focused on the naivety of peasants, the existence of creepy dudes, and the hope of being rescued by noble-hearted men. I guess if you want to teach your kids to watch out for psychopaths, here you go. My issue is that as always with these books, it's filled with constant unnecessary nastiness. Some chicken is really mean to Jemima and calls her lazy and unable to sit long enough to properly hatch the eggs. When Jemima gets rescued, dogs eat all the eggs she's been desperately saving up. Then at the very end, it's implied that a bunch of Jemima's ducklings died because she did such a bad job of sitting.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    ""I wish to hatch my own eggs; I will hatch them all by myself," quacked Jemima Puddle-duck." and this ... "Come into the house as soon as you have looked at your eggs. Give me the herbs for the omelette. Be sharp!" He was rather abrupt. Jemima Puddle-duck had never heard him speak like that. She felt surprised, and uncomfortable. ""I wish to hatch my own eggs; I will hatch them all by myself," quacked Jemima Puddle-duck." and this ... "Come into the house as soon as you have looked at your eggs. Give me the herbs for the omelette. Be sharp!" He was rather abrupt. Jemima Puddle-duck had never heard him speak like that. She felt surprised, and uncomfortable.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    What a lovely, intelligent classic story. I didn't know I would like these stories of Beatrix Potter so much. Throughout the story, it kept me engaged on to what would happen. Great read. What a lovely, intelligent classic story. I didn't know I would like these stories of Beatrix Potter so much. Throughout the story, it kept me engaged on to what would happen. Great read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    There's a scene in the movie Heartburn where Jack Nicholson is reading this book to his very young daughter. He finishes it, and sits there stunned for a second. Then he shakes his head and whistles. "Whew! What a story!" I concur :) _______________________________________ The plot of Jemima Puddleduck is remarkable similar to that of many trashy French crime novels. I consider this further in my review of Les Stripteaseuses du Petit Ecran. There's a scene in the movie Heartburn where Jack Nicholson is reading this book to his very young daughter. He finishes it, and sits there stunned for a second. Then he shakes his head and whistles. "Whew! What a story!" I concur :) _______________________________________ The plot of Jemima Puddleduck is remarkable similar to that of many trashy French crime novels. I consider this further in my review of Les Stripteaseuses du Petit Ecran.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    This is a great book. A mother duck trying to lay her eggs. In trying to find somewhere to nest she encounters a sly handsome fox. I was a little perturbed when drawing near to the ending and wondered whether I should have read this to my 3 year old granddaughter. I hope she doesn’t have nightmares! Love Beatrix Potter.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I'm not sure why I enjoyed this story so much and I did. Jemima, I think, reminds me of myself a tad bit. She takes up the archetype of the fool and walks blindly into her predators home. She even gathers herbs and ingredients to cook her with. Luckily the trusty dog is there to save the day. I love foxes and even though the fox is a scoundrel in this story I like the fox. This is a good one. You should read it. I'm not sure why I enjoyed this story so much and I did. Jemima, I think, reminds me of myself a tad bit. She takes up the archetype of the fool and walks blindly into her predators home. She even gathers herbs and ingredients to cook her with. Luckily the trusty dog is there to save the day. I love foxes and even though the fox is a scoundrel in this story I like the fox. This is a good one. You should read it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    After owning ducks and having a duck like Jemima Puddle-Duck, I have way more appreciation for this story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    I read this as a child, but that was a gazillion years ago. Thanks to a friend sending me a link again today, I got the chance to enjoy it again, this time on-line. It was incredibly interesting too, in some instances Beatrix Potter's animal and bird-centric perspective makes one feel a bit uncomfortable. Nature (& mankind's) harsher realities are not avoided. What a rewarding read. PS ....and those illustrations.... ♥ ♥ ♥ http://www.archive.org/stream/taleofj... I read this as a child, but that was a gazillion years ago. Thanks to a friend sending me a link again today, I got the chance to enjoy it again, this time on-line. It was incredibly interesting too, in some instances Beatrix Potter's animal and bird-centric perspective makes one feel a bit uncomfortable. Nature (& mankind's) harsher realities are not avoided. What a rewarding read. PS ....and those illustrations.... ♥ ♥ ♥ http://www.archive.org/stream/taleofj...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maritina Mela

    *3.5 For god's sake, leave the poor duck to hatch her own eggs! I don't know if I should rate this one since I am not the target audience, but hey, I have rated books with fairy tales before :) It's a good thing this one was very short and easy to read. Also, the illustrations are so adorable! *3.5 For god's sake, leave the poor duck to hatch her own eggs! I don't know if I should rate this one since I am not the target audience, but hey, I have rated books with fairy tales before :) It's a good thing this one was very short and easy to read. Also, the illustrations are so adorable!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    A great cautionary fable about not blindly putting your trust in just anyone, even if they seem really nice. As my favorite musical "Into the Woods" puts it: "Nice is different than good." A great cautionary fable about not blindly putting your trust in just anyone, even if they seem really nice. As my favorite musical "Into the Woods" puts it: "Nice is different than good."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    Your average child in the early 1900's must have had considerably more advanced vocabulary expectations than your average child today. I'm always amazed by the complexity of these Potter stories compared to modern children's stories, although this one is slightly simpler than the others. This is one of my daughter's favorite Beatrix Potter stories. Of course. There is a sinister threat involved, and potential death, and destruction. That sort of thing always manages to hold her interest. Beware Your average child in the early 1900's must have had considerably more advanced vocabulary expectations than your average child today. I'm always amazed by the complexity of these Potter stories compared to modern children's stories, although this one is slightly simpler than the others. This is one of my daughter's favorite Beatrix Potter stories. Of course. There is a sinister threat involved, and potential death, and destruction. That sort of thing always manages to hold her interest. Beware of foxes bearing hospitality. Not a bad lesson. I'm glad she likes the old school tales so much. There's something about them that really appeal and impact in a way a lot of modern storytelling doesn't--I think it's that they treat a child with respect for his or her intelligence and ability to process dark themes without being psychologically scarred.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ladiibbug

    #9 Peter Rabbit children's series Ooooh, this charmed me from the cover -- cutie pie Jemima Puddle-Duck with her baby blue bonnet and pink shawl. I spent an extra hour after reading, ooh'ing and ahhh-ing over the wonderful artwork. I could easily keep this on my bedside table and immerse myself in the art & story. Absolutely loved the innocent Jemima Puddle-Duck happily walking along with the nattily dressed fox. Somehow as a child I missed reading the Peter Rabbit books. In 2017, I plan to read th #9 Peter Rabbit children's series Ooooh, this charmed me from the cover -- cutie pie Jemima Puddle-Duck with her baby blue bonnet and pink shawl. I spent an extra hour after reading, ooh'ing and ahhh-ing over the wonderful artwork. I could easily keep this on my bedside table and immerse myself in the art & story. Absolutely loved the innocent Jemima Puddle-Duck happily walking along with the nattily dressed fox. Somehow as a child I missed reading the Peter Rabbit books. In 2017, I plan to read the other 22 books in this precious series. Inside cover says Beatrix Potter's farm had a real Jemima duck who wasn't good at hatching eggs, and that Potter's favorite sheepdog, Kep, was used in the story as the duck's wise friend who rescues her from the deceptively charming sandy-whiskered gentleman (the fox).

  13. 4 out of 5

    ♡︎Bee♡︎

    Awwwn. This was so fun to read. I missed reading children's books and picked this one off the library shelf as I thought Jemima Puddle-duck looked really dashing and ladylike in her bonnet and all her 'duckery '. Might start rereading a lot of children's books now. Ah, the nostalgia. Awwwn. This was so fun to read. I missed reading children's books and picked this one off the library shelf as I thought Jemima Puddle-duck looked really dashing and ladylike in her bonnet and all her 'duckery '. Might start rereading a lot of children's books now. Ah, the nostalgia.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    Loved by children both big and small. Nothing like a story by Beatrix Potter.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. i love how kep the wise collie looks out for jemima 🥰

  16. 5 out of 5

    GoldGato

    Jemima Puddle-Duck, a duck before her time, wants to hatch her own eggs. While her sister-in-law is quite happy to bypass such a rigorous job, Jemima is adamant...her eggs, her hatching. She leaves the safety of the farm to find a special nesting spot, but this liberated ducky runs into a foxy gentleman who is not quite the good samaritan as she believes him to be. Allen Atkinson is the illustrator for this edition of the Potter classic. Such a wonderful talent who died so young, his Peter Rabbit Jemima Puddle-Duck, a duck before her time, wants to hatch her own eggs. While her sister-in-law is quite happy to bypass such a rigorous job, Jemima is adamant...her eggs, her hatching. She leaves the safety of the farm to find a special nesting spot, but this liberated ducky runs into a foxy gentleman who is not quite the good samaritan as she believes him to be. Allen Atkinson is the illustrator for this edition of the Potter classic. Such a wonderful talent who died so young, his Peter Rabbit series is worth the bookstore hunt as his characters always ring true (yes, white ducks should wear blue bonnets). Book Season = Spring (ducklings)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    Another cautionary tale about trusting the wrong person. Miss Jemima is tired of her eggs being taken from her after she lays them. She decides she's going to find a safe place to lay them where no one will find them. She meets a distinguished looking gentleman that looks an awful lot like a fox who is more than willing to help her and leads her to a place well out of the way. Fortunately for Jemima, she has a big mouth and informs the farm dog where she has been going. The dog and a couple of dogg Another cautionary tale about trusting the wrong person. Miss Jemima is tired of her eggs being taken from her after she lays them. She decides she's going to find a safe place to lay them where no one will find them. She meets a distinguished looking gentleman that looks an awful lot like a fox who is more than willing to help her and leads her to a place well out of the way. Fortunately for Jemima, she has a big mouth and informs the farm dog where she has been going. The dog and a couple of doggie friends ensure that Jemima gets to keep her eggs and her life. Strangely, the distinguished gentleman is not ever seen again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dichotomy Girl

    You know,I really feel sorry for this poor duck, who is a bit naive and seems to be taken advantage on every side by friend and foe. And the last line just seems like insult added to injury. I'm glad that I pre-read this, I might skip sharing it with the 3 year old. You know,I really feel sorry for this poor duck, who is a bit naive and seems to be taken advantage on every side by friend and foe. And the last line just seems like insult added to injury. I'm glad that I pre-read this, I might skip sharing it with the 3 year old.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    This is a beautiful illustrated comic showing a different version of the much loved tale. I picked this up at my local library as part of a Beatrix Potter re imagined gallery. http://www.comicartfestival.com/beatr... This is a beautiful illustrated comic showing a different version of the much loved tale. I picked this up at my local library as part of a Beatrix Potter re imagined gallery. http://www.comicartfestival.com/beatr...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    The whole Peter Rabbit series is a must for any child's collection and this tale is great. The story is about poor Jemima. All she wants to do is lay her eggs in peace, and be allowed to hatch them herself. The story is a classic and my children adore it. The whole Peter Rabbit series is a must for any child's collection and this tale is great. The story is about poor Jemima. All she wants to do is lay her eggs in peace, and be allowed to hatch them herself. The story is a classic and my children adore it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    i knew collies were very clever

  22. 5 out of 5

    monica ♪

    Very short, cute and entertaining read ❤ A good choice to get out of my reading slump. LOL

  23. 5 out of 5

    K. Anna Kraft

    I have arranged my thoughts into a haiku: "Zealous and naïve, One might hope for nice things, but Not know if they're good." I have arranged my thoughts into a haiku: "Zealous and naïve, One might hope for nice things, but Not know if they're good."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Great classic story written and beautifully illustrated by Beatrix Potter.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eve Littlejohn

    Having not read this book before I was quite surprised by the story, assuming it was going to be a happy tale about a mother duck and her babies. In reality, a naive duck leaves the safety of her home in order to find a place where she can hatch her eggs by herself. Along the way she meets a gentleman who is nice to her and appears to be trying to help her, which ends up with her putting her eggs at risk. I think that overall the book provides a good message for children. Firstly it shows the imp Having not read this book before I was quite surprised by the story, assuming it was going to be a happy tale about a mother duck and her babies. In reality, a naive duck leaves the safety of her home in order to find a place where she can hatch her eggs by herself. Along the way she meets a gentleman who is nice to her and appears to be trying to help her, which ends up with her putting her eggs at risk. I think that overall the book provides a good message for children. Firstly it shows the importance of not being able to instantly trust strangers, even if they appear to be kind to you. Secondly, it shows that it is ok to have help, and that you don’t always know what is best for you – had Jemima Puddle-Duck accepted help from the hen then there is a good chance that her eggs would have all hatched well. I think that this is an important concept for children to understand, as often they will see adults as being ‘bad guys’ for stopping them doing something they are enjoying, but are not always aware that this is for their own safety. Finally, this book shows that sad things do happen in life, and that not every ending is necessarily a happy one. Jemima Puddle-Duck was in tears when her eggs were eaten, which allows children to see that it is ok to cry or be upset in times of hurt. The ending of the book was both happy and sad, which shows that there is not always a happily ever after, and that there will be times when things are just ok and not perfect. I found the book to be quite wordy. There is a lot of text on each page, and the language is quite adult in some places, which could potentially lose the interest of the child. There are also some things that the author assumes that the reader would know, but it is unlikely that children of today would. For example, the fox asks Jemima Puddle-Duck to fetch some herbs and onions to make an omelette. Young children will not necessarily know that omelettes are made from eggs, nor that the herbs and onions mentioned are used for making roast duck. Although there is not a picture on every page, there is at least one picture on each double page spread. There is often a full page of text alongside an illustration. The pictures are always framed, suggesting that we are not meant to be part of the story, but rather watching it happen in front of us. The pictures are looking in line with the characters, which implies that we are going on the journey with Jemima Puddle-Duck. The pictures are the original watercolours by Beatrix Potter herself, and are consistently pastel coloured and smooth lines throughout the book, not changing for different situations or emotions. The pictures give an insight as to what is happening in the text, but are not able to show the story by themselves.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mathew

    Jemima’s unfortunate life-choices would come to fruition during a particularly bountiful period of Potter’s writing. With members of the Cannon family, tenants of hers during her time at the village of Sawrey (in the Lake District), Jemima’s story is a tragic one but then she is exceptionally dim-witted. Frustrated with the fact that she is not allowed to nest any of her own eggs on the farm, Jemima flies off into a nearby wood where she encounters a cunning fox who smoothly offers her a room ne Jemima’s unfortunate life-choices would come to fruition during a particularly bountiful period of Potter’s writing. With members of the Cannon family, tenants of hers during her time at the village of Sawrey (in the Lake District), Jemima’s story is a tragic one but then she is exceptionally dim-witted. Frustrated with the fact that she is not allowed to nest any of her own eggs on the farm, Jemima flies off into a nearby wood where she encounters a cunning fox who smoothly offers her a room next to his home as a nesting place. As a way of celebrating this relationship, the fox suggests that Jemima begin to collect ingredients for an omelette. She agrees, little realising that the vegetables and herbs she is gathering are the main ingredients for stuff duck. Fortunately she informs the farm’s collie, Kep (Potter’s favourite sheepdog) of the events, and he gathers two fox-hound puppies to join him paying the trickster ‘a visit’. Whilst Jemima loses her eggs and a good slice of her dignity it doesn’t all end bad for she finds she allowed, eventually, to hatch her own eggs and we close with her waddling off with four chicks.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    Beatrix Potter created such delightful stories! Not only is her visual imagery richly captivating but so is her literary prose. She was a true artist and possessed a classic, graceful style. Her stories are best read on a blanket in your garden or backyard; Spring and Autumn are best. Ages: 3 - 7 #spring #autumn #animalstories **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable Beatrix Potter created such delightful stories! Not only is her visual imagery richly captivating but so is her literary prose. She was a true artist and possessed a classic, graceful style. Her stories are best read on a blanket in your garden or backyard; Spring and Autumn are best. Ages: 3 - 7 #spring #autumn #animalstories **Like my reviews? Then you should follow me! Because I have hundreds more just like this one. With each review, I provide a Cleanliness Report, mentioning any objectionable content I come across so that parents and/or conscientious readers (like me) can determine beforehand whether they want to read a book or not. Content surprises are super annoying, especially when you’re 100+ pages in, so here’s my attempt to help you avoid that! So Follow or Friend me here on GoodReads! You’ll see my updates as I’m reading and know which books I’m liking and what I’m not finishing and why. You’ll also be able to utilize my library for looking up titles to see whether the book you’re thinking about reading next has any objectionable content or not. From swear words, to romance, to bad attitudes (in children’s books), I cover it all!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Malia

    Reread this one while waiting to enter Beatrix Potter's Hill Top Farm in England. It is a grisly tale about reproductive justice! Poor Jemima, who isn't particularly smart but wants to be a mother, isn't allowed to make her own decisions. So desperate times and all that, she goes on the lam. She gets duped by one terrible dude taking advantage of her dire situation, and the dudes who try to save her end up ruining everything. (#banmen, am I right?) Jemima Puddle-duck ends up pretty traumatized fr Reread this one while waiting to enter Beatrix Potter's Hill Top Farm in England. It is a grisly tale about reproductive justice! Poor Jemima, who isn't particularly smart but wants to be a mother, isn't allowed to make her own decisions. So desperate times and all that, she goes on the lam. She gets duped by one terrible dude taking advantage of her dire situation, and the dudes who try to save her end up ruining everything. (#banmen, am I right?) Jemima Puddle-duck ends up pretty traumatized from the whole thing but ekes out something of a happily ever after for herself. The moral is that this mess could have been prevented by letting Jemima have some autonomy in the first place. On the complete flip side, it's really fun to read these books once you've been to the Lake District and her house. Utterly charming landscape and setting to contrast the grim text.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Octavia Cade

    "Jemima Puddle-Duck was a simpleton: not even the mention of sage and onions made her suspicious." This is goddamn hilarious. I don't remember ever being particularly struck by this one as a kid, but reading it now, for the first time in decades, I am enormously amused. I don't know what I find funnier - that dimwitted duck making a nest from the feathered remains of the previous victims of her foxy host, or the fact that, after she is saved from said fox by some friendly dogs, come specifically "Jemima Puddle-Duck was a simpleton: not even the mention of sage and onions made her suspicious." This is goddamn hilarious. I don't remember ever being particularly struck by this one as a kid, but reading it now, for the first time in decades, I am enormously amused. I don't know what I find funnier - that dimwitted duck making a nest from the feathered remains of the previous victims of her foxy host, or the fact that, after she is saved from said fox by some friendly dogs, come specifically to help her, those friendly dogs eat her children. I should have shelved this as horror, but I was too busy cackling to care.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Jemima Puddle-Duck misplaces her trust in another while searching for a location to hatch her eggs, before new friends intervene to help. This is the second appearance of Jemima Puddle-Duck (see: The Tale of Tom Kitten). Readers sensitive to depictions of abduction or violence might want to avoid this story. Readers seeking a suspenseful story about naive trust in strangers should be entertained.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...