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How to Win the Culture War: A Christian Battle Plan for a Society in Crisis

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THE BATTLE LINES HAVE BEEN DRAWN ... Many Christians have fallen into the trap of proclaiming Peace! Peace! when there is no peace. Hiding their eyes from the pressing issues of the day, they believe that resistance to the prevailing culture is useless. At the same time, other Christians have been too quick to declare war, mistaking battlefield casualties as enemies rather THE BATTLE LINES HAVE BEEN DRAWN ... Many Christians have fallen into the trap of proclaiming Peace! Peace! when there is no peace. Hiding their eyes from the pressing issues of the day, they believe that resistance to the prevailing culture is useless. At the same time, other Christians have been too quick to declare war, mistaking battlefield casualties as enemies rather than victims. In How to Win the Culture War Peter Kreeft issues a rousing call to arms. Christians must understand the true nature of the culture war - a war between the culture of life and the culture of death. Kreeft identifies the real enemies facing the church today and maps out key battlefields. He then issues a strategy for engagement and equips Christians with the weapons needed for a successful campaign. Above all, Kreeft assures us that the war can be won - in fact, it will be won. For those who hope in Christ, victory is assured, because good triumphs over evil and life conquers death. Love never gives up. Neither must we. Peter Kreeft is professor of philosophy at Boston College and the author of many books, including Between Heaven and Hell, Socrates Meets Jesus and (with Ronald Tacelli) Handbook of Christian Apologetics (all IVP).


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THE BATTLE LINES HAVE BEEN DRAWN ... Many Christians have fallen into the trap of proclaiming Peace! Peace! when there is no peace. Hiding their eyes from the pressing issues of the day, they believe that resistance to the prevailing culture is useless. At the same time, other Christians have been too quick to declare war, mistaking battlefield casualties as enemies rather THE BATTLE LINES HAVE BEEN DRAWN ... Many Christians have fallen into the trap of proclaiming Peace! Peace! when there is no peace. Hiding their eyes from the pressing issues of the day, they believe that resistance to the prevailing culture is useless. At the same time, other Christians have been too quick to declare war, mistaking battlefield casualties as enemies rather than victims. In How to Win the Culture War Peter Kreeft issues a rousing call to arms. Christians must understand the true nature of the culture war - a war between the culture of life and the culture of death. Kreeft identifies the real enemies facing the church today and maps out key battlefields. He then issues a strategy for engagement and equips Christians with the weapons needed for a successful campaign. Above all, Kreeft assures us that the war can be won - in fact, it will be won. For those who hope in Christ, victory is assured, because good triumphs over evil and life conquers death. Love never gives up. Neither must we. Peter Kreeft is professor of philosophy at Boston College and the author of many books, including Between Heaven and Hell, Socrates Meets Jesus and (with Ronald Tacelli) Handbook of Christian Apologetics (all IVP).

30 review for How to Win the Culture War: A Christian Battle Plan for a Society in Crisis

  1. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Sunday, February 16, 2014, Mr. Kreeft spoke on this subject at St. Gregory's Abbey and University in Shawnee, OK, 30 minutes from my home. Hearing him made me want to re-listen to this book and share it again with as many people as possible. The message is as fresh and valid as ever. ========================= Written ten years ago, How to Win the Culture War is just as relevant as if it was published yesterday. The gist of Kreeft's book is that we're fighting the wrong enemy—each other—when all t Sunday, February 16, 2014, Mr. Kreeft spoke on this subject at St. Gregory's Abbey and University in Shawnee, OK, 30 minutes from my home. Hearing him made me want to re-listen to this book and share it again with as many people as possible. The message is as fresh and valid as ever. ========================= Written ten years ago, How to Win the Culture War is just as relevant as if it was published yesterday. The gist of Kreeft's book is that we're fighting the wrong enemy—each other—when all the while the real enemy, Satan, flies under the radar. So we fight the wrong battles, using inappropriate tactics, against those we are supposed to be helping fueled by a myriad of misunderstandings largely created by the enemy (AKA the father of lies). Ironic? Tragic! The book is full of good quotes, a dream dialogue between the author and his holy angel and a letter obtained from a fallen spirit reminiscent of The Screwtape Letters. Here are a few of the quotes I liked:'America does not know the difference between sex and money. It treats sex like money because it treats sex as a medium of exchange, and it treats money like sex because it expects its money to get pregnant and reproduce.' 'Christ took Satan very seriously (though not obsessively). If we do not, how can we say our minds are on line with the Lord? If we claim to have matured beyond belief in Satan, we claim to have matured beyond Christ... Christ commanded us to conclude the only prayer he ever gave us, the model prayer, with "Rescue us from the evil one" (Matthew 6:13). The Greek word is a singular noun, not a plural or a participle, and it has a definite article. The proper translation is not just "evil" but "the evil one." '...no society has yet existed that has successfully built its knowledge of morality on any basis other than religion. In theory the natural moral law can be known by natural human reason alone without knowing the supernaturally revealed divine law, but in practice this is very rare; there has never been a whole society of Platos and Aristotles. It is a massive and obvious fact of history that religion has always been the primary source of mankind's knowledge of morality. This fact is so obvious that no age ever ignored it except this one.'What is the solution? How are we to win? Do what Christ told us to do. Become saints. What are you waiting for?! No excuses. Start right now! ><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>< Really enjoying this on audio... Wish I could get more of Kreeft on audio. I love the way he thinks! He makes you work at thinking, like a mental drill sergeant. Excellent fitness strengthening for your ole' noggin.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This is the first book by the author I have read (it will not be the last) and it has some similarities with a few other books on the culture war that I have fondly read and reviewed [1]. The author is clearly someone who has read a lot of books relating to religion and culture, and is considered as a notable Catholic philosopher. This is evident in the book by his desire to build a wide coalition of traditionalists against the forces of social decadence. He spends a great deal of time in this b This is the first book by the author I have read (it will not be the last) and it has some similarities with a few other books on the culture war that I have fondly read and reviewed [1]. The author is clearly someone who has read a lot of books relating to religion and culture, and is considered as a notable Catholic philosopher. This is evident in the book by his desire to build a wide coalition of traditionalists against the forces of social decadence. He spends a great deal of time in this book reminding the reader who the real enemy is--specifically Satan and his demonic forces, rather than the people with whom we may be at odds, like social liberals, Muslims, and others. While I cannot say I agreed with everything in the book, and the book as a whole struck me as more postmillennially optimistic than I am personally, it was a feel-good book if you enjoy reading material that relates to our troubled cultural situation in the United States. The author does not appear to think greatly about divine judgment, but rather about historical judgment, and comes to the same conclusion that barring a moral restoration our civilization is doomed. This book does not wear out its welcome at just over 100 pages. Within this efficiently written work are nine short chapters. After an introduction, the author reminds the reader (if he or she is not aware) of the fact that we are at war culturally speaking. Most readers will not need the reminder. After this comes the identity of the enemy on a spiritual level. The author then writes about true and false spiritual warfare. The author then discusses Colson's law, and intriguing reminder that either cops or conscience is needed to police the wanton desires and natural chaos of unredeemed man. After that the author, somewhat weirdly, copies C.S. Lewis and tries to give Satan a set piece speech discussing his plans for the millennium, which apparently do not involve being bound and restrained in the bottomless pit. The author then discusses the fiercest battle in the cultural wars--namely sex wars--and discusses what makes these battles so ferocious with a slightly modified and unpleasant dialogue with a gay activist. The book then ends on three optimistic chapters that look at the secret weapon that will win the war (saints--the author apparently does not expect the return of Jesus Christ in a premillennial fashion), gives some "basic training" on how to be a saint, and gives an optimsitic discussion of why we must win. The author assumes, probably accurately, that the reader will be among the "we." There is a lot that is amusing and witty about the book. Kreeft is, in general, a congenial sort of philosopher of the sort that would be enjoyable to talk to at a dinner table over good food. This is not to say that the book is perfect. Although the book is short and does not overstay its welcome, at the same time there are abrupt shifts in tone. It is as if Kreeft was a fan of the writings of C.S. Lewis (as I am [2]) but did not separate the various types of work within Lewis' oeuvre. There are bits of essays like "God In The Dock" or "Men Without Chests" here, but more than a little bit of the "Screwtape Letters" as well. It is an awkward fit at times, and the dialogue sections lack a bit of authenticity since the writer is, quite literally at times, playing the devil's advocate. I am sure this book was fun to write, but as a reader I would have really preferred it had the author been consistent in tone and a bit more serious-minded than he shows himself to be here. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... [2] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/tag/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Sutfin

    This book sums up the culture wars in the West. Kreeft walks the reader through the twentieth century, like a confident detective, piecing the clues together of the world's bloodiest period in history. He writes about war, and the tyrannous regimes that instigated them, to the decline of morals in the West. He refers to America as the "culture of death" as John Paul the II so properly called us. With our sex with out baby—pleasure— philosophy and the murder of the innocent. He has truly sought t This book sums up the culture wars in the West. Kreeft walks the reader through the twentieth century, like a confident detective, piecing the clues together of the world's bloodiest period in history. He writes about war, and the tyrannous regimes that instigated them, to the decline of morals in the West. He refers to America as the "culture of death" as John Paul the II so properly called us. With our sex with out baby—pleasure— philosophy and the murder of the innocent. He has truly sought truth for its own sake and has steered the reader to a precipice where one is left dangling over the edge wondering how to get out of the mess we've made of ourselves. So what is the real problem? Kreeft asks. What's really going on? With this simple question Kreeft's answer is not, the "experts" or the poisonous philosophy of those proud, pro-enlightenment professors of sociology and psychology in the liberal establishment of our day who say there is no truth. It isn't even the Left or the Right or Hollywood or the Media. So what is is it then? Well, I'll let you figure that out. He tells you in the way C.S. Lewis would and then gives you the simplest solution to the problem possible—but also the hardest. With that said. This book comes recommended with as much recommendation as I can recommend, which is fully. If you don't read this you might be that poor soul that never gets out of the dark.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Felipe

    Excelente em alguns trechos, decepcionante em outros. A crítica recorrente ao aborto e à revolução sexual constitui um dos pontos fortes do livro. Fora a teologia romana, ver os muçulmanos como irmãos que adoram o mesmo Deus é um dos piores pontos do livro.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    An interesting view on the culture war in modern-day society and how we found ourselves at this point. Kreeft clearly sees a battle between good and evil being waged, and some of his viewpoints would not be popular among the mainstream.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

    Brilliant. Brilliant. Brilliant.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    What Peter Kreeft wrote here about Bill Clinton in 2002 approximates America's affection for Donald Trump: “I have a theory about Time [Magazine]; that it is simply Playboy with clothes on. For one kind of playboy, the world is simply one big whorehouse; for another kind, it’s one big piggy bank. For both kinds of playboy, things are getting better and better. “That’s why Americans gave a 75 percent approval rating to Bill Clinton, the prefect combination of the two kinds of playboys. ... He kept What Peter Kreeft wrote here about Bill Clinton in 2002 approximates America's affection for Donald Trump: “I have a theory about Time [Magazine]; that it is simply Playboy with clothes on. For one kind of playboy, the world is simply one big whorehouse; for another kind, it’s one big piggy bank. For both kinds of playboy, things are getting better and better. “That’s why Americans gave a 75 percent approval rating to Bill Clinton, the prefect combination of the two kinds of playboys. ... He kept himself happy with some big whores, and he kept us happy with some big piggy banks. We loved him for the same reason the Germans loved Hitler when they elected him: ‘It’s the economy, stupid.’ Hitler gave them autobahns and Volkswagons, jobs and housing. In fact, Hitler wrought the greatest economic miracle of the twentieth century: from economic and military ruin to full employment and national pride in a few short years. What else matters as long as the emperor gives you bread and circuses? People are pigs, not saints; they love slops, not holiness, right? Or wrong?”

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mr. V

    Quick easy read that hits on some of the problems faced with being a good Christian in today's world. I liked the first half of the book much better. I had a strong philosophical agreement with the vertical and horizontal lines concerning community - chaos and cops - conscious. These four lines demonstrate in the most simplistic form the battle with government's role. Quick easy read that hits on some of the problems faced with being a good Christian in today's world. I liked the first half of the book much better. I had a strong philosophical agreement with the vertical and horizontal lines concerning community - chaos and cops - conscious. These four lines demonstrate in the most simplistic form the battle with government's role.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alan Alexandrino

    Um bom livro. É verdade que a teologia romanista do autor se faz evidente do início ao fim. No entanto, existem vários insights importantes a respeito da guerra cultural na qual os cristãos estão inseridos. Dureza mesmo são as repetidas afirmações ao longo fa obra, no sentido de que judeus, cristãos e muçulmanos são irmãos separados que adoram ao mesmo Deus.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Henn

    Not as clever as other Kreeft books that I have read. Identifies that our society is in crisis and calls Christians to sanctity.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Grant Robertson

    I've read better books by Kreeft, ie: CS Lewis for the Third Millennium. I've read better books by Kreeft, ie: CS Lewis for the Third Millennium.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Monte Malenke

    Great perspective and insights.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    Fantastic.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alli Shoemaker

    I can’t get into his narrative styles. The arguments are interesting, but the Socratic dialogue and Screwtape Letter narrations are more distracting than helpful to me. There are also some weird lines, one of which basically implied all the New Age followers he met always seemed “flighty, flaky and female, at least in spirit.” In the context, I wanted to know why he made “female” sound like it had just as bad of a connotation as flaky and flighty. I’m guessing it was an unclear sentence structur I can’t get into his narrative styles. The arguments are interesting, but the Socratic dialogue and Screwtape Letter narrations are more distracting than helpful to me. There are also some weird lines, one of which basically implied all the New Age followers he met always seemed “flighty, flaky and female, at least in spirit.” In the context, I wanted to know why he made “female” sound like it had just as bad of a connotation as flaky and flighty. I’m guessing it was an unclear sentence structure, but it still came off rather odd. I also wanted concrete, real situations to draw from. This was a very abstract regurgitation of the greats. Practicing millennial Catholics now need help reconstructing language in a way that’s understood and won’t be written off. Maybe the only way to do that is showing instead of telling. (I.e. sainthood) I was just hoping for more practical guidance of how that looks, especially in media, in school communities, etc.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rod Zinkel

    I read this in 2010, and wrote this: Kreeft writes of issues that are the battles of the culture war: abortion, promiscuity, academics, the media, but puts them into the Christian perspective of a war waged by Satan. Kreeft makes no apologies for his terms of warfare; he realizes there will be those who would prefer a retraction because the belief in Satan is extreme in their systems, including those of some Christians. Kreeft emphasizes the need for the Christian value of sex at the base of so I read this in 2010, and wrote this: Kreeft writes of issues that are the battles of the culture war: abortion, promiscuity, academics, the media, but puts them into the Christian perspective of a war waged by Satan. Kreeft makes no apologies for his terms of warfare; he realizes there will be those who would prefer a retraction because the belief in Satan is extreme in their systems, including those of some Christians. Kreeft emphasizes the need for the Christian value of sex at the base of so many issues. Abortion, contraception, and the sexual revolution have devalued sex, and thus the family. As to how to win the culture war it is a call to become saints, first by giving oneself wholly to God, then by acting on it, not thinking about it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Portella

    Not what I expected I thought the book it would be a manual on how to tackle with school political doctrination and how to deal with atheists, but it is nothing like that. The author thesis is that the cause of all corruption in the world is the devil's work and to battle it with must be saints. Many chapters are imaginary dialogs with angels, unbelievers and even Satan. In the end the book has some good thoughts, but it is boring and I barely made to the end. Not what I expected I thought the book it would be a manual on how to tackle with school political doctrination and how to deal with atheists, but it is nothing like that. The author thesis is that the cause of all corruption in the world is the devil's work and to battle it with must be saints. Many chapters are imaginary dialogs with angels, unbelievers and even Satan. In the end the book has some good thoughts, but it is boring and I barely made to the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    J.A.R

    A good book. The writing style was elementary and a bit childish. However, the main theme of the battle of objectivity in Western society is well presented. Written in 2002, the battle for the greatest question in history, "what is truth?", continues to debated in the society. A good book. The writing style was elementary and a bit childish. However, the main theme of the battle of objectivity in Western society is well presented. Written in 2002, the battle for the greatest question in history, "what is truth?", continues to debated in the society.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deanna Rinebolt

    Although this book was written in 2002, it is very much a book for today! I could not put the book down and read it in a couple of hours. I highly recommend it to Christians. It is definitely something the church needs to read and act on.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

    Not what I expected, but really good. Kreeft pulls no punches, writes very clearly, is an excellent thinker, and has a great sense of humor. His final solution to the culture war is spot on and inspires me to continue to turn towards the Lord.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bard

    “Be a saint.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Haydon

    An excellent book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ciro Castillo

    Buen libro.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Romero Cartaxo

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt Darland

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Van

  27. 5 out of 5

    Colin Duellman

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dyego X

  29. 4 out of 5

    Iker Ayerdi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Cotter

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