Hot Best Seller

The School Year Survival Cookbook: Healthy Recipes and Sanity-Saving Strategies for Every Family and Every Meal (Even Snacks)

Availability: Ready to download

From the authors of the bestselling cookbook How to Feed a Family and the bloggers behind The Sweet Potato Chronicles comes the cookbook that will help parents navigate the perils of the busy school year, one meal (and snack) at a time. The School Year Survival Cookbook is a fail-proof guide to the calendar-packed time that can break a parent's spirit: the school year. For From the authors of the bestselling cookbook How to Feed a Family and the bloggers behind The Sweet Potato Chronicles comes the cookbook that will help parents navigate the perils of the busy school year, one meal (and snack) at a time. The School Year Survival Cookbook is a fail-proof guide to the calendar-packed time that can break a parent's spirit: the school year. For families, cooking from September to June is about way more than just packing lunch boxes. It's trying to shoehorn a healthy dinner into already tight schedules that go in multiple directions; it's getting everyone fed before the school bus arrives; it's fuelling kids up for soccer practice and figuring out dinner when you get home after the dance recital. This book addresses every major food dilemma parents face during the 300-plus days of the school year, with 110 recipes and road-tested, guaranteed-to-work, effective strategies that will keep families on track even during the most hectic weeks. Learn how to become a lunch ninja that packs school lunches even the pickiest kid will love; master the art of the meal prep to save your sanity; celebrate the humble leftover and transform it into lunches and dinners that no one at the dinner table will ever complain about; fuel your active kids so that their brains and bodies are fed. From strategic dinners that become school lunches to double-duty baking that puts the "fast" in breakfast, The School Year Survival Cookbook is an indispensable guide for every parent, kitchen, and family.


Compare

From the authors of the bestselling cookbook How to Feed a Family and the bloggers behind The Sweet Potato Chronicles comes the cookbook that will help parents navigate the perils of the busy school year, one meal (and snack) at a time. The School Year Survival Cookbook is a fail-proof guide to the calendar-packed time that can break a parent's spirit: the school year. For From the authors of the bestselling cookbook How to Feed a Family and the bloggers behind The Sweet Potato Chronicles comes the cookbook that will help parents navigate the perils of the busy school year, one meal (and snack) at a time. The School Year Survival Cookbook is a fail-proof guide to the calendar-packed time that can break a parent's spirit: the school year. For families, cooking from September to June is about way more than just packing lunch boxes. It's trying to shoehorn a healthy dinner into already tight schedules that go in multiple directions; it's getting everyone fed before the school bus arrives; it's fuelling kids up for soccer practice and figuring out dinner when you get home after the dance recital. This book addresses every major food dilemma parents face during the 300-plus days of the school year, with 110 recipes and road-tested, guaranteed-to-work, effective strategies that will keep families on track even during the most hectic weeks. Learn how to become a lunch ninja that packs school lunches even the pickiest kid will love; master the art of the meal prep to save your sanity; celebrate the humble leftover and transform it into lunches and dinners that no one at the dinner table will ever complain about; fuel your active kids so that their brains and bodies are fed. From strategic dinners that become school lunches to double-duty baking that puts the "fast" in breakfast, The School Year Survival Cookbook is an indispensable guide for every parent, kitchen, and family.

30 review for The School Year Survival Cookbook: Healthy Recipes and Sanity-Saving Strategies for Every Family and Every Meal (Even Snacks)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    No. There's no way your children are clamoring for a "Kale, Sweet potato and Goat Cheese Frittata" for dinner. It's just not possible. These recipes are supposed to save time and be kid friendly, but this is a failure on both fronts. Suggested lunch sides include raw bok choy, beet hummus, sea asparagus, mini corn and radishes, and sliced dragon fruit - really? This is impractical, hipster nonsense. There's no parent who has the time or desire to bake (from scratch for 35 minutes) pizza muffins No. There's no way your children are clamoring for a "Kale, Sweet potato and Goat Cheese Frittata" for dinner. It's just not possible. These recipes are supposed to save time and be kid friendly, but this is a failure on both fronts. Suggested lunch sides include raw bok choy, beet hummus, sea asparagus, mini corn and radishes, and sliced dragon fruit - really? This is impractical, hipster nonsense. There's no parent who has the time or desire to bake (from scratch for 35 minutes) pizza muffins as a snack before making dinner. Pasta with spinach and tomatoes is an easy dinner, yet this recipe calls for grating garlic on a microplane (time-consuming and enjoy those garlicy fingers!), fresh basil and umami paste. The section on desserts begins with a child's quote, "I don't mind once-a-week dessert because I'm healthy." Um okay. What a cheerful childhood! Yet if these were my dessert options, I'd be happy with once-a-week too.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shipshapeeatworthy

    Is there anything that can spark a more impassioned debate than children and nutrition? Probably, but as soon as I discovered I was pregnant food became so important — was I eating enough of the “right” things? Being a vegetarian didn’t help matters because people seem to think you live off love when you don’t eat meat. Seriously. So by the time my daughter came along I felt like it was time to focus my energy on what her relationship with food was going to be. I wanted her to be able to try a v Is there anything that can spark a more impassioned debate than children and nutrition? Probably, but as soon as I discovered I was pregnant food became so important — was I eating enough of the “right” things? Being a vegetarian didn’t help matters because people seem to think you live off love when you don’t eat meat. Seriously. So by the time my daughter came along I felt like it was time to focus my energy on what her relationship with food was going to be. I wanted her to be able to try a variety of foods and understand the link between what makes us feel good and be at our best. I also wanted her to be able to enjoy the time we spend around the dinner table as a family. There aren’t (to my knowledge) many (if any) cookbooks about vegetarianism and family cooking. My search began and I started to seek out cookbooks that focused on family meals. I looked for books that had interesting and versatile recipes — ones that I could easily modify to fit our vegetarian lifestyle (at least we’re all vegs, so I only needed to make one meal). The only book that really fit my criteria was Laura Keogh and Ceri Marsh’s How to Feed a Family . They’re the creators of the wildly popular site Sweet Potato Chronicles and their newest book, The School Year Survival Cookbook, seeks to provide families with a solid game plan — full of healthy food and useful strategies — to get them through the fast-paced run from September to June. I appreciate that they really advocate for a practical and flexible way to feed a family. Since they don’t follow a strict meat-and-potatoes model I am able to find recipes that are either vegetarian or can easily be made vegetarian (or vegan! You’d be surprised how many dairy and egg allergies there are out there, so I sometimes adapt recipes to help my other mom pals out). Strategies — Laura and Ceri know that having healthy recipes is only part of the battle! So their strategies — stocking and organizing your pantry, getting the right gear (what kids are carrying to school for lunches can make all the difference), and meal planning — are clearly explained in the beginning of the book so that you can prepare for success. Since my daughter is only 3, the most relevant strategy for me is stocking and organizing my pantry (I find that with cookbook reviewing that I’m cooking so many different recipes that I don’t always sit down to formally meal plan ahead of time. But speaking to other parents I know that meal-planning is the only thing that keeps their families happily well-fed). Breakfast always happens so fast! This is why their Whole Grain Pancake & Waffle Mix is so brilliant! I love that I have it pre-made and ready to go in my pantry so on those mornings when people want pancakes/waffles I’m all-raring to go. Healthy Recipes — Speaking about breakfast, another strategy they employ is over-night prep (or Make Ahead — they helpfully list recipes that you can pull together ahead of time). Take the Chocolate Avocado Chia Pudding— with a handful of ingredients and about ten minutes of prep will have you waking up to a beautiful and healthy breakfast pudding! Kids will feel that rush of mischievousness from thinking they’re having dessert at breakfast and you’ll feel great that you’ve packed them full of avocado! But if the food doesn’t taste great then you’re in trouble — the Sweet Potatoes totally understand this, which is why all of their food tastes delicious. All of the recipes I’ve tried from their newest book have gotten 100% approval from my family. The book is organized by meal — Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Snacks/Treats — making it easy to find the recipes and plan. I really appreciate the playful spin they put on classic dishes — take their Pancake Taco. Even Taco Tuesday can get a bit tired but make it a breakfast for dinner proposition and voila! Some people may look at this book and feel like it may not be for them because they don’t have kids but as soon as I started trying recipes I felt like this cookbook would be great for anyone who has a busy schedule that’s looking to cook easy, healthy meals. The first person I thought to recommend this book to is my younger sister who finds it challenging to work full time and find time to eat healthy meals. When I made the Baked Oatmeal Cups I thought they would be perfect for her because she could make them ahead of time and throw them in her bag to take to work — I think it’s helpful to be able to turn to something healthy and homemade and not to the sweet treats at the local coffee shop. These cups are also easy to bake up egg-free if you just used mashed banana as a substitute for the eggs. I’m also aware that it’s the middle of summer and not many people want to think about the school year just yet but here’s my tip: if you get this book now and try it out then you’ll be all ready for that 2017-18 school year. I’ve found a few recipes that have been the perfect antidote for lack of desire to cook induced by warm weather. Take the Penne w/ Sun-Dried Tomato & Spinach — by using chickpea flour pasta this dish turns into a hearty, quick, and extremely delicious meal that uses only a few ingredients. Since my husband doesn’t eat fish, I threw together my own version of Umami Paste (equal parts tomato paste & barley miso with tamari, EVOO, and garlic powder — next time I’ll make sure I have some crushed olives to add-in too) — I think it honored that “explosive taste” that the original paste delivers to this dish. Since it’s summertime and the freshest ingredients are available I thought I’d give their Sweet Corn & Zucchini Fritters a try considering my daughter has a love for corn that borders on obsessive. It was my first time ever making fritters and I love that they are batch-cooked (another thing I learned early on from SPC — a truly genius strategy!) so that I made them once and then had lunch locked down for the next few days. Another fav here that can be batch-cooked are their Broccoli & Cheese Patties. Both the fritters and the patties can be frozen for up to 3 months which can be helpful to have on hand. I really feel like The School Year Survival Cookbook helps to take the mealtime struggles away by providing busy families with a way to be prepared to eat healthy, home-cooked meals. Let Laura and Ceri inspire you with their delicious recipes and helpful strategies. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Laura Keogh, Ceri Marsh, and Appetite by Random House for providing me with a free copy of this book. I did not receive monetary compensation for my post, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. Please note that this is an excerpt from a review posted on www.shipshapeeatworthy.wordpress.com

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris From RecipesNow!

    Some may feel it’s kind of odd that I would be reviewing the School Year Survival Cookbook by Laura Keith and Ceri Marsh in August when for most children the school year doesn’t begin again until September. This is the “Blessed Summer” parents are thinking, where they can relax and don’t have to worry about lunches. The madness that is “trying to get your kids to eat breakfast while running for the bus”, “putting together a packed lunch for school”, and then “finding time to make something edibl Some may feel it’s kind of odd that I would be reviewing the School Year Survival Cookbook by Laura Keith and Ceri Marsh in August when for most children the school year doesn’t begin again until September. This is the “Blessed Summer” parents are thinking, where they can relax and don’t have to worry about lunches. The madness that is “trying to get your kids to eat breakfast while running for the bus”, “putting together a packed lunch for school”, and then “finding time to make something edible for dinner”, seems far away now. This is not your typical recipe book. This book isn’t just for the school year. The School Year Survival Cookbook is all about helping parents manage during the school year to get the kids fed nutritional meals. The authors want you to start your prep work in August in order to prepare your mind and kitchen for the onslaught that is the school year. It all begins with the Pantry For Success. This chapter explains how to get organized, how to set yourself up for success, and what you need in your pantry. Gearing Up gives you the essential kitchen gear that will help make your life easier in general. It then continues on with the section “Meal Planning For Sanity”. This gives you instructions on how to plan your meals in advance. The authors admit that meal planning is not sexy but claim that meal planning will change your life in a positive way. I have to agree, knowing what you’re going to eat, what you’re going to need to buy, gives you an idea of when you need to start, how much you’re going to need to spend, and might even help stave off the panic. The first section of recipes starts with Breakfast. The goal is to make a brainy breakfast. These recipes are designed to balance blood sugar, pair protein with carbs, and add antioxidants. The recipes include tips on substituting ingredients and preparation. I find tips in a recipe book are invaluable. The overnight refrigerator puddings, which look extremely easy to assemble, should be a quick fix in the mornings because they were mostly done the night before. Some of the recipes like the smoothie bowls have a step-by-step video on the book’s website. I think the publishers might have made it easier had they used a QR code which goes directly to that video but they are easy to find on the website. The Lunch menu is all about being a Lunch Ninja. Ceri Marsh apparently refers herself to herself as a Lunch Ninja because of her system of creating the lunches as she’s preparing dinner. Like making extra carrots to go with the lunch in the lunch packs if she’s peeling carrots for dinner etc. I think that’s an excellent tip. If you’re going to make carrots once, why do it a second time later for lunches, just make a couple of extras at the same time. Lunches in this chapter are not all about sandwiches, there are lots of different opportunities for nutrition. There are tons of different ways to approach side dishes with the meals, including some lovely looking soups. The Sweet Corn and Zucchini Fritters looks like something I would enjoy for myself. The book even contains some helpful information about how many calories, how much water kids need, carbohydrates for energy, lean proteins and so much more. Dinner starts with Mastering Meal Prep. This section encourages batch cooking and explains how. Many of the recipes include tips on how to get ahead by preparing in advance. There is a lot of variety of in the recipes. I don’t think any of these recipes would go untouched even though kids are notoriously fussy eaters. You might’ve heard of Transformers, the cars that turned into robots. Now meet Transformer Meals. For instance, Spicy Beef becomes Spicy Beef Tacos with Roasted Sweet Potatoes and then becomes Easy Beef and Black Bean Enchiladas or even Couscous Stuffed Peppers. I like the idea of Transformers because you can make one thing and it makes two meals. While you are cooking one night you’ll make extra protein to use it in one of the other Transformer meals. After the Transformer section are several recipes for make ahead. They all have tips on how to save time while making dinner. Learn what you can do in advance to speed up the process once dinner time comes. Edible Leftovers Then there is an entire section on leftover makeovers which is a slightly different strategy. The authors share their strategy on how to successfully use leftovers everyone will eat. The Snacks and Treats section is, of course, going to be your kids’ favorite section. They have lots of luscious looking bars, cornbread, muffins, etc. even nut free energy bites. It continues with terrific dips, breads, and other deliciousness. I am entirely sure every recipe here would be the eaten down to the last crumb. See the original review along with a recipe for Blueberry Grunt Greatness at RecipesNow! Reviews and Recipes Magazine. This review is in response to a hard copy of the book sent to me by the publishers in return for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dawn O. | Left Coast Reader

    The School Year Survival Cookbook is crazy popular because I was on the holds list at my library a looong time. It's popularity comes as no surprise because its curated by two highly organized moms (my soul mates!). If working in the kitchen has you feeling all thumbs then you need this cookbook in your life. From the get-go Keogh & Marsh help you organize your pantry and put the right staples in your fridge and freezer. The recipes are for real moms and the ingredients lists are 'real'. Each rec The School Year Survival Cookbook is crazy popular because I was on the holds list at my library a looong time. It's popularity comes as no surprise because its curated by two highly organized moms (my soul mates!). If working in the kitchen has you feeling all thumbs then you need this cookbook in your life. From the get-go Keogh & Marsh help you organize your pantry and put the right staples in your fridge and freezer. The recipes are for real moms and the ingredients lists are 'real'. Each recipe includes get ahead prep to help you save precious minutes when its time to make dinner. I especially like the section on turning leftovers into meals you want to eat. I will be purchasing a copy for myself! Let me know in the comments if you have this cookbook and your thoughts.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J.H. Moncrieff

    Not bad, with some good ideas for recipes and planning to stay one step ahead during the school year. I bought it to help get me through the busy teaching terms, so I wasn't the intended audience, and found the cutesy stuff about kids a tad nauseating. (I really could care less what the authors' kids liked for lunch, etc.) But I bought this knowing it would be geared for parents, and that's okay. Still a decent book. Will update when I try the recipes. Not bad, with some good ideas for recipes and planning to stay one step ahead during the school year. I bought it to help get me through the busy teaching terms, so I wasn't the intended audience, and found the cutesy stuff about kids a tad nauseating. (I really could care less what the authors' kids liked for lunch, etc.) But I bought this knowing it would be geared for parents, and that's okay. Still a decent book. Will update when I try the recipes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    A beautiful cookbook with lots of recipes that look easy and healthy, explained simply and without too many fancy ingredients. I especially liked their meal transformers section and the way they highlighted vegetarian and on the go recipes. Four stars because it can’t be five stars until I’ve tried recipes and they’re good, instead of just LOOKING good!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Nason

    I LOVE this cookbook. I borrowed it from the library, and now that I've read it I will be purchasing ASAP. The recipes are simple and quick, but healthful and (at least look) really delicious. The little chatty quips with each recipe are also entertaining. I LOVE this cookbook. I borrowed it from the library, and now that I've read it I will be purchasing ASAP. The recipes are simple and quick, but healthful and (at least look) really delicious. The little chatty quips with each recipe are also entertaining.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I managed to try making the recipe for Peanut Butter and Banana Sandwich Slow Cooker Oats, which said that it would make 4 servings, but made WAY more like 8! I was eating porridge for a week! But it was really good! Hope to try other recipes soon.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Martina O'Dwyer

    Too much sugar and nuts Sorry I bought this book. Definitely not what I would be putting into a child's lunchbox. Few recipes of use. Too much sugar and nuts Sorry I bought this book. Definitely not what I would be putting into a child's lunchbox. Few recipes of use.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brie Peters

    Made: carrot cake breakfast cookies, peanut butter & banana sandwich slow cooker oats, tuna and black bean wrap, nut free energy bites. Borrowed from library! Note to self: borrow again!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    3.5 edging towards 4 for it's yummy factor, however there's not much chance I'll have time to make much of it in reality. 3.5 edging towards 4 for it's yummy factor, however there's not much chance I'll have time to make much of it in reality.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 29,34,39,44,73,123,126,129,131,136,145,148,155,170,173,180,190,194,199,204

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Not enough pictures

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I am incredibly excited to test out these amazing recipes. I also love the tips and tricks the author gives for how to organize your pantry!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nada

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Feenstra

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meaghan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mandy W

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Darci

  25. 5 out of 5

    SLK

  26. 5 out of 5

    Duckpondwithoutducks

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shauna Bostian

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...