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Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Comics Vol. 1

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The first of three volumes that present for the first time ever the classic Star Wars newspaper strip from 1979-1984 in its complete format--including each Sunday title header and "bonus" panels in their meticulously restored original color. Initially the color Sundays and B & W dailies told separate stories, but within six months the incomparable Russ Manning merged the a The first of three volumes that present for the first time ever the classic Star Wars newspaper strip from 1979-1984 in its complete format--including each Sunday title header and "bonus" panels in their meticulously restored original color. Initially the color Sundays and B & W dailies told separate stories, but within six months the incomparable Russ Manning merged the adventures to tell brand new epic seven-days-a-week sagas that rivaled the best science fiction comics of all time. Volume One contains 575 sequential comic strips from the strip's premiere on March 11, 1979 to October 5, 1980.


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The first of three volumes that present for the first time ever the classic Star Wars newspaper strip from 1979-1984 in its complete format--including each Sunday title header and "bonus" panels in their meticulously restored original color. Initially the color Sundays and B & W dailies told separate stories, but within six months the incomparable Russ Manning merged the a The first of three volumes that present for the first time ever the classic Star Wars newspaper strip from 1979-1984 in its complete format--including each Sunday title header and "bonus" panels in their meticulously restored original color. Initially the color Sundays and B & W dailies told separate stories, but within six months the incomparable Russ Manning merged the adventures to tell brand new epic seven-days-a-week sagas that rivaled the best science fiction comics of all time. Volume One contains 575 sequential comic strips from the strip's premiere on March 11, 1979 to October 5, 1980.

30 review for Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Comics Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brad Abraham

    A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away... It is a time of much celebration. STAR WARS (not "Episode IV", not "A New Hope") has exploded across movie screens everywhere and changed the film and cultural landscapes forever. It hasn't left theaters since May 1977. In 1979, with The Empire Strikes Back well over a year away, the fans are clambering for something to tide them over. Monthly comics from Marvel are spread out, and only Splinter of the Mind's Eye and the novelization of Star Wars fill A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away... It is a time of much celebration. STAR WARS (not "Episode IV", not "A New Hope") has exploded across movie screens everywhere and changed the film and cultural landscapes forever. It hasn't left theaters since May 1977. In 1979, with The Empire Strikes Back well over a year away, the fans are clambering for something to tide them over. Monthly comics from Marvel are spread out, and only Splinter of the Mind's Eye and the novelization of Star Wars fill the gap. Enter Star Wars: the daily comic strip. Appearing in newspapers everywhere in 1979, it was a lifeline to Star Wars obsessed kids. I would know; I was one of them. Living in Vancouver and by that point infatuated with Star Wars, it was my daily fix as I ate my cereal at the kitchen table every morning. I clipped the strips from the newspaper and pasted them into a scrapbook, creating my own Star Wars comic book. Every day, every week I added more. Then, we moved to a city whose local paper didn't carry the strip. My self-made comic disappeared in the move from that city to another. By 1983 I'd pretty much forgotten about the daily strips. Then I saw this on the shelf of my local comic shop, and, after flipping thru its pages, found myself transported back to my bedroom in Vancouver in 1979. Despite its hefty price tag, I had to own it; and now I do. This isn't your father's Star Wars - well, okay, it probably is, if your father was a child of the 1970s. It'll obviously appeal more to children of the 70s too, but after years of strictly controlled and managed spinoffs from Lucasfilm and now Disney it's quite a shock to see the Star Wars galaxy rendered in such pulpy tones. At times it feels more like a vintage Buck Rogers strip with Star Wars’ beloved main characters – at that point Luke, Han, Leia, Chewie, R2 and 3P0 and, of course, Darth Vader. The Wookie planet Kashyyk makes an early appearance, and towards the end of this first volume we get an appearance from Boba Fett (but are characterized in a much different fashion than the current canon). The stories don’t always click. Some have a dashed-off quality, owing to the daily demands of a strip. There’s a bit of repetition, as at times the weekend strip advances the main story ahead by several leaps, prompting the follow up weekday ones to reiterate what already happened. The design of the worlds, outside the main characters and ships, feel dropped in from Captain Video and Flash Gordon, with retro 1930s capes and tights in place of Star Wars’ rough and rugged look. But there's something appealing about the throw-everything-at-the-wall-see-what-sticks. Some storylines are silly, some truncated, some total WTF insanity. But they're all a long-forgotten piece of SW lore and I loved every cotton-picking page of it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    It’s hard for me to rate this book objectively. The comic strip hit the newspapers between Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back. As indicated in the foreword, at that time, the only other Star Wars material available were three tie-in novels: Alan Dean Foster’s Splinter of the Mind’s Eye and the first two of Brian Daley’s original Han Solo trilogy. It’s probably hard for modern fans to imagine a world where there were so few Star Wars novels available, and the great empty canvas of the Star Wars It’s hard for me to rate this book objectively. The comic strip hit the newspapers between Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back. As indicated in the foreword, at that time, the only other Star Wars material available were three tie-in novels: Alan Dean Foster’s Splinter of the Mind’s Eye and the first two of Brian Daley’s original Han Solo trilogy. It’s probably hard for modern fans to imagine a world where there were so few Star Wars novels available, and the great empty canvas of the Star Wars universe that had yet to be filled. The Home Video revolution was still a few years off, and the notion that you could pop in a VHS tape anytime you needed a hit of Star Wars felt as distant as that galaxy far, far away. Then the comic strip debuted and you could get a hit of Star Wars every day in the newspaper. I read it every day, I clipped them from the paper and pasted them into a scrapbook. I waited patiently for the arrival of the newspaper every morning, hoping it would get in the box before school so I could find out what happened next! With my scrapbook long gone (I gave it to a friend several years ago) seeing this collection again is a bit of nostalgic time travel. I am surprised by how many of the stories, how much of the dialog, and how many of the images I remember. The mind is a fascinating thing. Do we ever really forget, or do our memories just enter a sort of long-term storage locker waiting for something to turn the key and open the door again? This isn't the first time an effort has been made to publish these strips in book form, but it's the first time they've been reproduced in their entirety as they were originally presented. (Thank you, Library of American Comics.) It must be said that looking back on these comic strips as an adult, I’m almost embarrassed by my enjoyment of them. They are rather simplistic and juvenile, some more than others. (Russ Manning did the artwork for almost all the stories in this volume, but there were different writers throughout this run of the strip.) And though the Sunday Strips and the Daily Strips featured two different storylines (similar to Manning’s Tarzan strip), after awhile, they merged. At this point the pacing started to feel a bit off — particularly in some of the later stories in this volume, where it seems they tried to make sure people who only read the Sunday papers could keep up, so they were essentially a week's worth of action compressed into one day. Also, I think Russ Manning's artwork was more consistently good on his earlier Tarzan comic strip, but there are still some panels here (particularly the color Sunday strips) where the artwork is just beautiful: the Millennium Falcon soaring through a planet’s ring system, a Jawa Sandcrawler bashing through the gates of an Imperial base — I had these images stuck in my head for decades. When you hit the Alfredo Alcala art near the end of this volume (after Manning became too ill to continue the strip), the drop in quality is a bit shocking. (Compare Manning's depiction of Darth Vader to Alcala's. Yeesh.) Russ Manning was a master of the clear line style, and if nothing else, this volume is a great testament to what he could do in the Star Wars universe — at a time when that universe was very much a blank slate.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    This is a collection of the Star Wars) newspaper comic strip, which ran from 1979-1984. This volume, #1, covers March 1979 - October 1980. Being a newspaper strip, I wasn't expecting the artwork to be all that good. And it isn't. Worse, though, is that it doesn't look like Star Wars. All of which I could forgive if the stories were any good but they aren't. The plots are silly and the characters, both Rebel and Imperial, make some really stupid decisions. I would only recommend this to the Star Wa This is a collection of the Star Wars) newspaper comic strip, which ran from 1979-1984. This volume, #1, covers March 1979 - October 1980. Being a newspaper strip, I wasn't expecting the artwork to be all that good. And it isn't. Worse, though, is that it doesn't look like Star Wars. All of which I could forgive if the stories were any good but they aren't. The plots are silly and the characters, both Rebel and Imperial, make some really stupid decisions. I would only recommend this to the Star Wars completist who has to consume all things Star Wars but it's not for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott Firestone

    I have no nostalgia when it comes to these strips, which were originally published in newspapers between Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back. I was around 5 years old, and not reading many newspapers... So looking objectively, three stars is probably generous, because these stories are kind of goofy. And the format works against our ability to read them as a whole. In the weekday strips, they had 2-3 panels to work with, but one of those panels was usually spent recapping what happened the day I have no nostalgia when it comes to these strips, which were originally published in newspapers between Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back. I was around 5 years old, and not reading many newspapers... So looking objectively, three stars is probably generous, because these stories are kind of goofy. And the format works against our ability to read them as a whole. In the weekday strips, they had 2-3 panels to work with, but one of those panels was usually spent recapping what happened the day before, so new readers wouldn't be lost. But that means the story is moving along at a snail's pace. It's like having a short story sent to you through the mail, one or two words at a time. There's no momentum. No drama. It is important to remember these comics' place in the history of the franchise. As I sit here in 2017, there are movies, DVDs, TV shows, novels, graphic novels, video games, and countless ways to engage with this mythology. When these comics came out, there weren't. Star Wars had left the theaters, but it wasn't something you could watch at home. And Empire wasn't out yet. All you had were some comic books from Marvel, and a couple of novels. So it's easy to see how people would latch onto this, desperate for some way to feed their need for Star Wars. It's a beautiful book with beautiful artwork.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    This is a tremendous blast from the past! I remember that there were Star Wars comics in the newspaper when I was a kid (I think my brother clipped them out of the Sunday funnies and saved them), but I have no memory of the stories—I wasn't much into the "serious" comic strips at that point, even if it was Star Wars. But still, seeing this style of art and storytelling does push a bunch of the nostalgia buttons. But it's not just nostalgia for its own sake. In fact, as I was reading through this This is a tremendous blast from the past! I remember that there were Star Wars comics in the newspaper when I was a kid (I think my brother clipped them out of the Sunday funnies and saved them), but I have no memory of the stories—I wasn't much into the "serious" comic strips at that point, even if it was Star Wars. But still, seeing this style of art and storytelling does push a bunch of the nostalgia buttons. But it's not just nostalgia for its own sake. In fact, as I was reading through this beautiful collection, I thought, "You know, I really like these goofy, silly stories!" They're part–Star Wars, part–Doctor Who, part–any other 1970s sci-fi story. And it is a lot a fun to read. One of the things that is most fun about these stories is that they come from that era between the first and second Star Wars movies, when no one knew anything about where the movie story was going. And there was hardly any "expanded universe" at that time, either—just Splinter of the Mind's Eye, the Han Solo novels, and the Marvel comics. (We're not mentioning the Holiday Special.) There was no "continuity," no comprehensive, connected galaxy. It was just that one great movie. That opens up infinite possibilities, because none of these comics stories has to align with anything other than the general traits of the characters. I found this surprisingly refreshing, actually. I even thought that it would be an interesting idea to start a whole new branch of the Expanded Universe that pretends there was only ever the one Star Wars movie—and thus, no "I am your father," no "I know...somehow, I've always known," no inevitability of Han and Leia's romance. It would just be Vader, this evil guy leading an evil empire, and a few Rebels fighting the power. The story wouldn't be constrained by needing to go anywhere in particular; it could just meander and be exciting and fun. I know: Disney is never going to authorize something like that. But this collection of comics is a hint of how much fun Star Wars could be, if all possibilities were open. Anyway, this volume has stories about Boba Fett, Han Solo's smuggling friends, the Wookiee planet (and yes, a mention of Life Day), Leia in all sorts of cool outfits, lizard people ("descendants of earthlike chameleons...intelligent and peaceful"), and...pacifog. Darth Vader utters many lines that have nothing to do with the imminent conflict within him—lines like, "My troopers will be protected from the pacifog. Thanks to your kunda filters, Quirz!" When I checked this book out from the library, I expected that it would be ridiculous, but I had no idea that I would genuinely enjoy it (and so much more than Marvel's current Star Wars graphic novel series). I can't wait to read the next volume!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    The compelling story of Star Wars in 1977 left fans wanting more. Unlike now, where we can own a copy of a much-loved film and watch any time we want, back in the late 1970s, Beta and VHS formats were still a few years from being an available commodity. There were a handful of novels that were released at the time, and Marvel was putting out a monthly comic book series, but the fans’ interest was not sated. They were clamoring for more content. Given that the sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, wou The compelling story of Star Wars in 1977 left fans wanting more. Unlike now, where we can own a copy of a much-loved film and watch any time we want, back in the late 1970s, Beta and VHS formats were still a few years from being an available commodity. There were a handful of novels that were released at the time, and Marvel was putting out a monthly comic book series, but the fans’ interest was not sated. They were clamoring for more content. Given that the sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, would not be released until May 1980, the Los Angeles Times Syndicate began running a daily Star Wars comic strip on March 11, 1979. Finally, fans could get a daily installment, albeit in very small doses, for the next five years. Star Wars: The Classic Newspaper Comics is the first of three volumes of daily and Sunday comic book strips to release this month. IDW and The Library of American Comics, along with Disney, Lucasfilm, and Marvel, are to thank for restoring the first ten stories of a total 27 storylines.... Read the full review at Fanbase Press website: http://www.fanbasepress.com/index.php...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Errrrrrick

    Okay, so remember, 3 stars means "I liked it." And I liked this. It was okay. There are new stories with the main characters from A New Hope, and they are reasonably entertaining. Star Wars loses some of its scope in newspaper comic form. A Star Destroyer which is awesome on the big screen, and slightly less so on your home television, is just not impressive in a newspaper comic format. Likewise a light saber fight or a blaster duel doesn't feel as thrilling when told three panels at a time (and Okay, so remember, 3 stars means "I liked it." And I liked this. It was okay. There are new stories with the main characters from A New Hope, and they are reasonably entertaining. Star Wars loses some of its scope in newspaper comic form. A Star Destroyer which is awesome on the big screen, and slightly less so on your home television, is just not impressive in a newspaper comic format. Likewise a light saber fight or a blaster duel doesn't feel as thrilling when told three panels at a time (and since the first panel is usually a recap of the previous day's comic) it's more like two panels at a time. It's better than almost all the EU stuff, not as good as the new movies that are coming out. I don't think you'll be too disappointed, but might check a library copy first.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Beautifully drawn by Manning. The stories are a bit thin, but entertaining nonetheless. I thought the Boba Fett story (done before Empire Strikes Back was released) was very good. The final sequence, with the turtle aliens and their gas that amplifies a species' worst traits(?), was clunky and a real chore to get through. The book is mostly worth it for Star Wars completists and Russ Manning fans. Beautifully drawn by Manning. The stories are a bit thin, but entertaining nonetheless. I thought the Boba Fett story (done before Empire Strikes Back was released) was very good. The final sequence, with the turtle aliens and their gas that amplifies a species' worst traits(?), was clunky and a real chore to get through. The book is mostly worth it for Star Wars completists and Russ Manning fans.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    These beautifully reproduced strips, Sundays and dailies, take the reader back to a time before Star Wars became culturally pervasive. The stories are a bit dated in light of the later sequels and expansions, but are still vivid adventures in a galaxy far, far away.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Khairul Hezry

    It's a passable effort. Star Wars is too vast a story to be limited to a four-panel daily strip. Bought it mainly for the historical aspect of it. It's a passable effort. Star Wars is too vast a story to be limited to a four-panel daily strip. Bought it mainly for the historical aspect of it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Doug Murphy

    The newspaper comic strips, completely non-canon but fun!

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    They did the best that they could with the information that they had. I like the drawing style for Darth Vader and Princess Leia.

  13. 5 out of 5

    R.W. Martin

    I have all three volumes, this brings me back to when I looked forward to the newspaper and clipping out the Star Wars strips back in the 70's, ahhhhh the 70's. I have all three volumes, this brings me back to when I looked forward to the newspaper and clipping out the Star Wars strips back in the 70's, ahhhhh the 70's.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brett Potts

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cory

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chadwick

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tom Dunphy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott wachter

  19. 5 out of 5

    fanfictiondreamer

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephen, Erin & Coraline

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  22. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Horton

  24. 4 out of 5

    Travis Brainerd

  25. 4 out of 5

    David

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mhorg

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alberto Martín de Hijas

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  30. 4 out of 5

    Charles F. Junjulas

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