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No Girls Allowed: Tales of Daring Women Dressed as Men for Love, Freedom and Adventure

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A female pharaoh? A woman general in the Kahn's army? A female Viking raider? No way, you say? Look again. Appearances can be deceiving ... Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic t A female pharaoh? A woman general in the Kahn's army? A female Viking raider? No way, you say? Look again. Appearances can be deceiving ... Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic treatment is perfect to transport readers back to bygone eras. The lives of these daring women were often filled with danger and the fear of discovery. However, for the sake of freedom, ambition, love or adventure, these women risked everything. No Girls Allowed brings a contemporary edge to a part of history largely untold - until now.


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A female pharaoh? A woman general in the Kahn's army? A female Viking raider? No way, you say? Look again. Appearances can be deceiving ... Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic t A female pharaoh? A woman general in the Kahn's army? A female Viking raider? No way, you say? Look again. Appearances can be deceiving ... Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic treatment is perfect to transport readers back to bygone eras. The lives of these daring women were often filled with danger and the fear of discovery. However, for the sake of freedom, ambition, love or adventure, these women risked everything. No Girls Allowed brings a contemporary edge to a part of history largely untold - until now.

30 review for No Girls Allowed: Tales of Daring Women Dressed as Men for Love, Freedom and Adventure

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    This is a really great idea--stories about women who disguised themselves as men to get what they really wanted. From legendary figures like Hatshepsut and Mu Lan to unknowns like Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, these are women who refused to let a little thing like their gender stand in the way of their goals. At about 10 pages per subject, each story is at best a cursory glance of what happened--at times so cursory I found myself flipping back, sure I'd missed a page because there was no logical flow to This is a really great idea--stories about women who disguised themselves as men to get what they really wanted. From legendary figures like Hatshepsut and Mu Lan to unknowns like Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, these are women who refused to let a little thing like their gender stand in the way of their goals. At about 10 pages per subject, each story is at best a cursory glance of what happened--at times so cursory I found myself flipping back, sure I'd missed a page because there was no logical flow to the story. The fictionalized accounts contain a lot of speculation, most of which could probably have been clarified with a little research--and if there really are no good accounts of a person, then maybe a story based entirely on hearsay isn't the best choice for a collective biography. There is a list of "further reading" in the back of the book, offering one title per subject. Of these seven works, one is a picture-book translation of a folk poem, one an excerpt from a collection of tales about female pirates, and two are novels. The art doesn't wow me, either. The artist doesn't use any shading--it's strictly black or white, which makes the chapter about the couple escaping slavery particularly hard to decipher. There are very few distinct "looks" to the characters, making it difficult to know who's who. I’d have preferred a broader scope to this book, one that focused not just on women who lived as men, but on women who did men’s things as women. While I applaud these women for working within their systems, a book that aims to empower girls with “you can do anything boys can do” undermines its message when it adds “as long as you pretend to be a boy.” For kids who need a gentle nudge toward gender equality, I'd steer them to Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women, or give them a full biography on one of the women featured here. For older readers and/or the scientifically-minded, Jim Ottaviani's Dignifying Science: Stories About Women Scientists is an excellent choice. No Girls Allowed had the potential to join these other excellent titles from the historical perspective, but is instead shallow and uninformative.

  2. 5 out of 5

    sweet pea

    while i love that these personages are brought to light for a new generation, i still have some problems with this collection. most of the bios end vaguely, as befits what little is known of their lives. the imagined dialogue, while perhaps engaging to the young reader, causes me consternation. most of the characters were familiar to me. the choice of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman as the Civil War soldier was most perplexing to me. there are others who led more fantastic lives and Loreta Velazquez would while i love that these personages are brought to light for a new generation, i still have some problems with this collection. most of the bios end vaguely, as befits what little is known of their lives. the imagined dialogue, while perhaps engaging to the young reader, causes me consternation. most of the characters were familiar to me. the choice of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman as the Civil War soldier was most perplexing to me. there are others who led more fantastic lives and Loreta Velazquez would have given them a Latina character besides. i suppose most of my favorite people would be "inappropriate" for youth: Jeanne Bonnet (who organized prostitutes into bands of pickpockets free from pimps), Mary Fields (who was the first African American female stagecoach driver for the USPS), Deborah Sampson (the Revolutionary War soldier), Mary Walker (the Civil War doctor) not to mention Billy Tipton and Babe Bean. this illustrates one of my problems with this book and most "women's history" books. it is always assumed womyn donned male dress solely to escape sexism. while that is most-assuredly often true, a transgender critique of these assumptions is most overdue.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Heather Glatzmayer- AASD

    Interesting to learn about so many woman that fought for themselves and made their lived better by doing what they wanted to do no matter what anyone told them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    This black and white Canadian-published comic is aimed at young readers and would be ideal for girls who resist being "girly" or for young trans readers. The brief 80-pp book tells six stories of women--beginning in ancient Egypt and concluding in the late 19th century--who passed as men for various reasons. Text at the end provides recommendations for further readings. This black and white Canadian-published comic is aimed at young readers and would be ideal for girls who resist being "girly" or for young trans readers. The brief 80-pp book tells six stories of women--beginning in ancient Egypt and concluding in the late 19th century--who passed as men for various reasons. Text at the end provides recommendations for further readings.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I was looking forward to this one because it's always interesting to learn how women overcome roadblocks in patriarchal societies. However, I was a bit disappointed with it. It puts out the idea that in order to succeed in a male-driven society, women have to basically become men. I'm not trying to devalue any of the accomplishments of these women, I'm just disappointed that some of the stories couldn't have been about women overcoming gender barriers while remaining visibly women, even though I I was looking forward to this one because it's always interesting to learn how women overcome roadblocks in patriarchal societies. However, I was a bit disappointed with it. It puts out the idea that in order to succeed in a male-driven society, women have to basically become men. I'm not trying to devalue any of the accomplishments of these women, I'm just disappointed that some of the stories couldn't have been about women overcoming gender barriers while remaining visibly women, even though I know that wasn't the focus of the book. I also found the black and white cartoons didn't draw my attention. I simply read the text as a narrative and occasionally glanced up at the illustrations. I wasn't overly fond of the weird circles for cheeks and sometimes at the end of the noses... Why were they only there sometimes? How come in one picture they had two circle cheeks but in the next they only had one? Aside from that, the characters all seemed rather bored, despite the challenging and exciting lives they were leading. I liked that the events in the book were arranged chronologically. It made it easy to get a sense of where things happened in history. It also showed that this gender-swapping not only has happened more than a few times, but it has been happening for thousands of years.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I would have given it four stars if the art had been more appealing...I just didn't care for that aspect of this book. Told in the form of a graphic novel [it is very slightly fictionalized history...she makes up conversations, but otherwise seems to stick to known facts], Susan Hughes chose several interesting lives to portray, all based on the fact that a woman had to pretend to be a man to get ahead in certain circumstances, ranging from ancient Egypt to 19th century America. Some were famili I would have given it four stars if the art had been more appealing...I just didn't care for that aspect of this book. Told in the form of a graphic novel [it is very slightly fictionalized history...she makes up conversations, but otherwise seems to stick to known facts], Susan Hughes chose several interesting lives to portray, all based on the fact that a woman had to pretend to be a man to get ahead in certain circumstances, ranging from ancient Egypt to 19th century America. Some were familiar figures, but I had never heard of others, and the variety made the book intriguing. The stories themselves were good, albeit brief. Longer versions of some of these tales exist in other books, and are worth seeking out if you become interested in a character in this book. If you work for a library, please take the Library of Congress CIP information with a MAJOR grain of salt. Their cataloger thought that this book was somehow about transgender sexuality, which isn't the case at all. It's about women who disguise themselves as men to achieve their life goals, so it belongs with other books on women's history, or with other books that group short biographical sketches.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaina Bee

    Fun little stories about seriously real people who transgressed and transcended the expectations of their patriarchal times/locations by switching their binary gender expressions out in the world—and I'd never heard of any of them before! As many of these people were almost lost entirely to history—most evidence of the female pharaoh, Hatshepsut, had been literally chiseled away by her successor's minions—not to mention the fact that cultural understandings of gender and sex vary widely through t Fun little stories about seriously real people who transgressed and transcended the expectations of their patriarchal times/locations by switching their binary gender expressions out in the world—and I'd never heard of any of them before! As many of these people were almost lost entirely to history—most evidence of the female pharaoh, Hatshepsut, had been literally chiseled away by her successor's minions—not to mention the fact that cultural understandings of gender and sex vary widely through the ages, it is not mentioned in this book whether any of these people were actually trans*-men. They are presented as cisgendered women, and it seems most of them probably were so. Some are even buried under a tombstone with a masculine name, including a Civil War soldier. Now that's a case of Don't Ask Don't Tell! The stories are quickly and quirkily told, with modern-day stylistic twists ("I'm just a girl," quips the ancient Egyptian), but is enough to whet one's appetite to explore the further reading bibliography.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    I have always loved stories about girls who masqueraded as men. Tamora Pierce's Song of the Lioness series fed into my interest early on and ever since I've been fascinated by any stories that feature girls dressed as men. This particular book tells the stories of seven such women, some I'd heard of (Mulan), and some I had not. Each chapter was quite short and concise, but detailed enough to incorporate emotion. This would be very good as a launching off point on the topic; it even includes sugg I have always loved stories about girls who masqueraded as men. Tamora Pierce's Song of the Lioness series fed into my interest early on and ever since I've been fascinated by any stories that feature girls dressed as men. This particular book tells the stories of seven such women, some I'd heard of (Mulan), and some I had not. Each chapter was quite short and concise, but detailed enough to incorporate emotion. This would be very good as a launching off point on the topic; it even includes suggested books for further reading. This was great fun and it's rekindled my interest in this subject.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    What a kick-ass book! Within just a few pages and a few well drawn black and white graphics, author Susan Hughes and artist Willow Dawson retell the stories of a handful of brave women who rebelled against traditional rules. To achieve their dreams, these women dressed as men and fought for power (Pharoh Hatshepsu), honor (Mu Lan), adventure (Alfhild), education(James Barry) and freedom (Ellen Craft). Written for a young young-adult audience, it will introduce girls to a wide variety of strong w What a kick-ass book! Within just a few pages and a few well drawn black and white graphics, author Susan Hughes and artist Willow Dawson retell the stories of a handful of brave women who rebelled against traditional rules. To achieve their dreams, these women dressed as men and fought for power (Pharoh Hatshepsu), honor (Mu Lan), adventure (Alfhild), education(James Barry) and freedom (Ellen Craft). Written for a young young-adult audience, it will introduce girls to a wide variety of strong women and, hopefully, continue to inspire them to strive for equality within their own home nations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christiana

    I think this would be very empowering to girls. Presented in graphic novel form, I think it really conveys the idea that girls can do anything they want to do. Graphics are a bit weak, but wonderful subject idea for a non-fiction/graphic novel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    One Sentence Review: A great premise for a book, but unfortunately the pacing and art don't quite reach their ultimate potential. One Sentence Review: A great premise for a book, but unfortunately the pacing and art don't quite reach their ultimate potential.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Quick read, finished it during lunch. Highly recommend this one to girls of all ages everywhere!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Helen Pugsley

    Oh my. Where do I begin? I really like the overall sentimate but not the execution. At the end of each story I kind of felt defeated. They died, got married and had quiet lives, or their worst nightmares came to pass! For instance, one of my favorite historical characters, Hatshepsut, they didn't even touch on how she became Egypt's first high priestess! Then it ended with her being blotted out... By a man! (Obviously, his endeavors were unsuccessful as we know she existed now!) The very last line Oh my. Where do I begin? I really like the overall sentimate but not the execution. At the end of each story I kind of felt defeated. They died, got married and had quiet lives, or their worst nightmares came to pass! For instance, one of my favorite historical characters, Hatshepsut, they didn't even touch on how she became Egypt's first high priestess! Then it ended with her being blotted out... By a man! (Obviously, his endeavors were unsuccessful as we know she existed now!) The very last line in the book was "We have no idea how many tombstones are actually female soldiers with male names." To be fair, perhaps this book struck a nerve with me because I grew up when it was still okay to tell a child "You _____ like a girl." I privately decided I'd be a man when I need to and I do heavy manual labor in dresses all the time! I'm not as butch as I once was, but women aren't percieved as weak as often anymore. Reading a book about women having to dress as men to get what they needed just kind of reminded me why I'm an angry, raging, feminist. The art is good! Very different! I've never seen a style like that before, and I like it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shayna

    The publisher listed "transgender" as one of the subjects for this book, which I don't 100% agree with. While some of the people highlighted in this book could possibly have been trans, the stories are all written more generally and imply that all the main characters were women who only dressed as men in order to gain access to the freedoms that men had. The publisher listed "transgender" as one of the subjects for this book, which I don't 100% agree with. While some of the people highlighted in this book could possibly have been trans, the stories are all written more generally and imply that all the main characters were women who only dressed as men in order to gain access to the freedoms that men had.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wina

    Non-fiction Graphic novel for ages 9-12. Very cool. Starts in ancient Egypt and ends with the Civil War. Includes an afterward and a list for further reading on each woman. It's so good to have a compact, accessible book on this topic. Non-fiction Graphic novel for ages 9-12. Very cool. Starts in ancient Egypt and ends with the Civil War. Includes an afterward and a list for further reading on each woman. It's so good to have a compact, accessible book on this topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ksenia

    Cute concept and execution. I probably would really have enjoyed reading this in elementary school. Just enough to get you curious and make you think and hopefully spend the time researching and reading more about these women.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    A fabulous look at some of the amazing stories of women in world history!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julie Akeman

    I loved this graphic novel of daring women who disguised themselves as men to get what they want out of life..the story of Mu lan is in here too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Whole And

    Excellent collection of stories depicting the exceptionally brave and powerful women throughout history. Thoroughly enjoyed although this is not for the faint of heart.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chinook

    I enjoyed this. It’s a very brief introduction, and I think maybe on the low end of middle grade level-wise. But it’s a fun collection of interesting stories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Herrera

    Title: Hughes, S., & Dawson, W. (2008). No girls allowed: tales of daring women dressed as men for love, freedom and adventure. Toronto, Ont.: Kids Can Press. Name: Brittany Herrera Type of Reference: Biographical Reference Call Number: 741.5 Description: This book tells the story of seven historical women that acted as men in order to reach their dreams that were viewed unacceptable for women to do during that particular time. This book tells the different stories in chronological order. This may b Title: Hughes, S., & Dawson, W. (2008). No girls allowed: tales of daring women dressed as men for love, freedom and adventure. Toronto, Ont.: Kids Can Press. Name: Brittany Herrera Type of Reference: Biographical Reference Call Number: 741.5 Description: This book tells the story of seven historical women that acted as men in order to reach their dreams that were viewed unacceptable for women to do during that particular time. This book tells the different stories in chronological order. This may be eye catching to 3-5 grade girls. My school does a living history museum in fifth grade. The girls often have difficulty choosing who to dress up as. This book would be a wonderful reference for those students. Review: Seven stories, in chronological order, introduce women in various times and countries who passed for men in order to get around restrictive societal codes. Most of the selections are quietly charming, with a mild wit in their execution. The bold black-and-white art clearly depicts each account, allowing breathing room for both the occasional piece of visual flair and the accessible narratives. Most of the stories feel similar in tone and presentation. There are variations in the storytelling, just not always for the best. The chapter on James Barry is curiously disconnected, as if the author were lacking credible sources, and the one on Ellen Craft is considerably narrower in scope and event than those of her fellows. But the tale of the Viking pirate Alfhild is undeniably fun, and the ending and message with regard to a girl fighting during the American Civil War provide an effective close for the volume. Amiable and slight, the book ends with a brief list of books that expand on each figure. Citation Review: Russell, B. (2008). No Girls Allowed: Tales of Daring Women Dressed as Men for Love, Freedom and Adventure. [Review of the book No girls allowed: tales of daring women dressed as men for love, freedom, and adventure]. School Library Journal, 54(9), 215.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    No girls allowed: Tales of daring women dressed as men for love, freedom and adventure. (2008). Kids Can Press. Citation by: Jackie LeMonds Type of Reference: Biography Call Number: Ref 305.42 Hug Content/Scope: Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic treatment transports readers to bygone eras. For the sake of freedom, ambition, l No girls allowed: Tales of daring women dressed as men for love, freedom and adventure. (2008). Kids Can Press. Citation by: Jackie LeMonds Type of Reference: Biography Call Number: Ref 305.42 Hug Content/Scope: Based on legends, poems, letters and first-hand accounts, these seven biographical tales tell of women who disguised themselves as men. From ancient Egypt to the 19th century, this historically accurate graphic treatment transports readers to bygone eras. For the sake of freedom, ambition, love or adventure, these women risked everything. This resource has a targeted audience of intermediate students. Accuracy/Authority/Bias: Includes bibliographical references. Figures sometimes considered apocryphal or legendary (Alfhild and Hua Mulan) are included alongside actual women with no differentiation, and many historically controversial assertions are stated as fact. Still, it's an enjoyable and unique presentation of little-known women's history. This could lead to great inquiry. Arrangement/Presentation: Contains graphic style stories about seven daring young women from around the world who disguised themselves as men in order to achieve their goals, including Hatshepsut,Mu Lan, Alfhild, Esther Brandeau, James Barry, Ellen Craft, and Sarah Rosetta Wakeman. Relation to other works: There are many biographies about women in history who have challenged society, this collection is presented in a current format that is popular with patrons today. Accessibility/Diversity: This book will appeal to young readers because it is in a graphic novel format. It will probably appeal more to girls because of the focus on women. Professional Review: (2008). Booklist

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lina

    This book summarises 7 different stories of women that lived at a time when they did not get the same rights that men do. This book starts by Ancient Egypt and goes all the way to the Civil War in the USA. All the stories have a common base of Women disguising themselves as men in order to obtain the same rights as men. Even though the only thing all these women changed about themselves was their clothes, yet that was all that was needed to be done in order for the society to respect them. The il This book summarises 7 different stories of women that lived at a time when they did not get the same rights that men do. This book starts by Ancient Egypt and goes all the way to the Civil War in the USA. All the stories have a common base of Women disguising themselves as men in order to obtain the same rights as men. Even though the only thing all these women changed about themselves was their clothes, yet that was all that was needed to be done in order for the society to respect them. The illustrations of the book are very basic, hence why I rated it a 3 not a 4. The illustrations did not help me develop a deeper understanding of the plot; the words were the only beneficial part of the book. I enjoyed the plot of the stories however and how the author related the stories together. She put each story in a different chapter, yet we were still able to relate them to each other as all of them had comparable and relating plots. All of them start by a women that has a dream and begins to achieve her dream by "becoming" a man. I would recommend this book to anyone that is interested in how women's rights affected women over the course of history. The plots are written very simply without too many details so it is an easy read. I would recommend it to people that are interested in history and politics but would like to approach it a different way: Something different than newspapers, newscasts, and textbooks.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    The stories of 7 women who disguised themselves as men, told in graphic novel format. There were stories in here I hadn't heard before. Of course I knew about Mulan, and I knew there were women who fought in the US Civil War. I didn't know about the woman who reigned as pharaoh, or about James Barry, the doctor who was a woman. Or pirate Alfhild. There's a good diversity of stories. They're told in chronological order, starting with the pharaoh and ending with the Civil War. They're from several di The stories of 7 women who disguised themselves as men, told in graphic novel format. There were stories in here I hadn't heard before. Of course I knew about Mulan, and I knew there were women who fought in the US Civil War. I didn't know about the woman who reigned as pharaoh, or about James Barry, the doctor who was a woman. Or pirate Alfhild. There's a good diversity of stories. They're told in chronological order, starting with the pharaoh and ending with the Civil War. They're from several different countries. They dressed as men for a variety of reasons. To help their family, to defend their country, to have a career, to escape from slavery, to seek adventure. It left me wanting to know more. And there's even a handy bibliography at the end to help me out. Of course they're children's or YA books, but that doesn't bother me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Simplified, but interesting, felt the message could've gotten across without the smattering of agenda...particularly for a simplified book. Reading about the individuals does make one curious about these real life people, though reading about them reveals discrepancies in the tales found within this. A swipe is taken at religion, at the same time that powerful religious icons and figures in religion are ignored (Jean of Arc, of course) including Hatshepsut who was devout & inspired by that same f Simplified, but interesting, felt the message could've gotten across without the smattering of agenda...particularly for a simplified book. Reading about the individuals does make one curious about these real life people, though reading about them reveals discrepancies in the tales found within this. A swipe is taken at religion, at the same time that powerful religious icons and figures in religion are ignored (Jean of Arc, of course) including Hatshepsut who was devout & inspired by that same faith in her God(s). If the book were about that then fine, there are certainly many sides to the tale, but for such a sterilely written as well as illustrated book...it felt out of place, pushy, and too general. Altogether I liked it, but it felt lacking; sterile. Good for all ages and genders though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trin

    Nice graphic collection of stories about women throughout history who disguised themselves as men for various ends. This book is far from perfect: far too many stories rely on speculation or stumble into "It's not know what happened to her at this point..." territory, and it's also kind of depressing how frequently the tales end with it all going horribly wrong for the women in question. But I'm still glad I read it, especially because I learned about James Barry, a British surgeon who implement Nice graphic collection of stories about women throughout history who disguised themselves as men for various ends. This book is far from perfect: far too many stories rely on speculation or stumble into "It's not know what happened to her at this point..." territory, and it's also kind of depressing how frequently the tales end with it all going horribly wrong for the women in question. But I'm still glad I read it, especially because I learned about James Barry, a British surgeon who implemented all sorts of medical reforms and performed one of the first successful Caesarean sections--and was also probably a woman who lived her whole life as a man. I really want to read a whole book just about Barry now.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lady Knight

    Cute collection of short story style biographies of "daring women" of the past. I do have to agree with some of the other reviewers though, the entries are far too short... some are even slightly confusing with how quickly they jump through chronology (i.e. James Barry in particular). Too, the research put into the collection is sketchy at best, there are several inacurracies, particularly in the Ellen Craft story, and could easily have been remedied by a bit more research. That said however, as Cute collection of short story style biographies of "daring women" of the past. I do have to agree with some of the other reviewers though, the entries are far too short... some are even slightly confusing with how quickly they jump through chronology (i.e. James Barry in particular). Too, the research put into the collection is sketchy at best, there are several inacurracies, particularly in the Ellen Craft story, and could easily have been remedied by a bit more research. That said however, as a way to get kids/younger teens interested in the lives of these remarkable women, this certainly hits the spot. Good for a graphic novel collection rather than as any kind of research or nonfiction collection.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Greymalkin

    I really wanted to read this, even though the art style is not to my taste at all. While the stories were interesting, I felt like they needed more. The interesting questions and even a better sense of the women involved was missing for most of them (which the book fully admits by asking many of the questions themselves in the text). I understand that the information is scarce because the women deliberately obscured their trails, but I felt like there must be more information out there than was I really wanted to read this, even though the art style is not to my taste at all. While the stories were interesting, I felt like they needed more. The interesting questions and even a better sense of the women involved was missing for most of them (which the book fully admits by asking many of the questions themselves in the text). I understand that the information is scarce because the women deliberately obscured their trails, but I felt like there must be more information out there than was presented in this book. More historical context would have been nice. The reference section was as slim as I was expecting. It was a good "get people interested in these characters" but not much "meat" here.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eden

    No Girls Allowed is a graphic novel with stories of 7 different women from history who dressed as men to be able to do what they wanted. Some wanted to fight in the army, one wanted to be a doctor and another wanted to be with the man she was in love with. I knew the story of Mulan, but the other women I didn't know about. Reading this graphic novel has made me really interested in reading about these other women and their lives. This graphic novel was a good read and although it doesn't give a fu No Girls Allowed is a graphic novel with stories of 7 different women from history who dressed as men to be able to do what they wanted. Some wanted to fight in the army, one wanted to be a doctor and another wanted to be with the man she was in love with. I knew the story of Mulan, but the other women I didn't know about. Reading this graphic novel has made me really interested in reading about these other women and their lives. This graphic novel was a good read and although it doesn't give a full history of the women in the book, I think after reading this it will make people interested to learn more about these brave women.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This book gives several very quick histories of women, disguised as men, throughout history and various cultures. While I would love for the histories to be more detailed, I think this book would serve reluctant readers well, and perhaps encourage them to read more about particular women or eras in history that interest them on their own. Each story is very short, quick, and to the point. I enjoy the black and white, graphic style to the art! Recommendation to the publishers if they print anothe This book gives several very quick histories of women, disguised as men, throughout history and various cultures. While I would love for the histories to be more detailed, I think this book would serve reluctant readers well, and perhaps encourage them to read more about particular women or eras in history that interest them on their own. Each story is very short, quick, and to the point. I enjoy the black and white, graphic style to the art! Recommendation to the publishers if they print another edition, I would LOVE to see the "further reading" section in the back expanded to include more than one recommendation per woman's story!

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