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Stress-Free Potty Training: A Commonsense Guide to Finding the Right Approach for Your Child

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No two children experience the toilet-training process in exactly the same way. While some kids might be afraid to even go near the bathroom, others may know when to go...but still never seem to make it there in time. This helpful guide takes the stress out of this challenging rite of passage, giving parents much-needed advice to help them identify what approach will work No two children experience the toilet-training process in exactly the same way. While some kids might be afraid to even go near the bathroom, others may know when to go...but still never seem to make it there in time. This helpful guide takes the stress out of this challenging rite of passage, giving parents much-needed advice to help them identify what approach will work for their child's temperament. The book distinguishes between common childhood personality types, providing easy techniques tailor-fit for all kinds of kids, whether they're stubborn or willful, clinging to diapers, afraid to move on, or just late-bloomers. The book shows how to: determine a child's readiness to begin potty training - gradually move children past their existing comfort zone, without causing undue pressure - handle accidents and temporary setbacks This straight-talking guide enables readers to help every child make this important life transition free of worry and in the way that's right for him or her.


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No two children experience the toilet-training process in exactly the same way. While some kids might be afraid to even go near the bathroom, others may know when to go...but still never seem to make it there in time. This helpful guide takes the stress out of this challenging rite of passage, giving parents much-needed advice to help them identify what approach will work No two children experience the toilet-training process in exactly the same way. While some kids might be afraid to even go near the bathroom, others may know when to go...but still never seem to make it there in time. This helpful guide takes the stress out of this challenging rite of passage, giving parents much-needed advice to help them identify what approach will work for their child's temperament. The book distinguishes between common childhood personality types, providing easy techniques tailor-fit for all kinds of kids, whether they're stubborn or willful, clinging to diapers, afraid to move on, or just late-bloomers. The book shows how to: determine a child's readiness to begin potty training - gradually move children past their existing comfort zone, without causing undue pressure - handle accidents and temporary setbacks This straight-talking guide enables readers to help every child make this important life transition free of worry and in the way that's right for him or her.

30 review for Stress-Free Potty Training: A Commonsense Guide to Finding the Right Approach for Your Child

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    This is a straightforward guide to potty training. Instead of giving one magical, rigid solution, it covers everything that might work and breaks the tips down by personality type. Very realistic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    3.5 stars. I didn't love everything they said for method, but the personality quiz and assessments were spot on for my daughter, and were quite helpful and realizing it was just going to be more of a process with her, and that it was ok. I took a more patient approach after this read. By that, I mean I went forward with the mindset that it was going to take longer than I'd expected, but that was what was working for my daughter, and also that we weren't having as many setbacks as I'd originally 3.5 stars. I didn't love everything they said for method, but the personality quiz and assessments were spot on for my daughter, and were quite helpful and realizing it was just going to be more of a process with her, and that it was ok. I took a more patient approach after this read. By that, I mean I went forward with the mindset that it was going to take longer than I'd expected, but that was what was working for my daughter, and also that we weren't having as many setbacks as I'd originally thought. So, this didn't change a whole lot of my method, but it did help me feel less stressed when I felt like I better understood where my daughter was coming from and what she was feeling. I'll likely take another look when I potty train my second (a couple years from now), and I'll be interested to see if it helps me see her as well as it did my first.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    I think that this book had some good ideas and solutions, especially the personality type divisions. However, we made the mistake of purchasing the audiobook version. The woman reading the book has a nice soothing voice, but is torturously sloooooow. I sped it up to 2x speed on my iPod because I feared we would never finish it otherwise (it sounded fine that way). Unfortunately we didn't learn much that was useful from this particular book, other than the fact that with our hard-headed child, al I think that this book had some good ideas and solutions, especially the personality type divisions. However, we made the mistake of purchasing the audiobook version. The woman reading the book has a nice soothing voice, but is torturously sloooooow. I sped it up to 2x speed on my iPod because I feared we would never finish it otherwise (it sounded fine that way). Unfortunately we didn't learn much that was useful from this particular book, other than the fact that with our hard-headed child, all we could do was offer praise and mild suggestions, and wait until he decided he was good and ready to use the potty on his own. He finally did. Finally. We just had to wait him out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ariana

    I first started reading the Oh Crap! Potty Training book, but the rigid approach wasn't working for our family. So I bought this book and really liked the idea of customizing your strategies based on your child's personality. My husband and I learned a great deal about our older son's temperament through the quiz and relevant chapters. Our son is now potty trained, thanks to the tips and techniques outlined in this book. We are so happy, and we feel like we can use the knowledge we gained about I first started reading the Oh Crap! Potty Training book, but the rigid approach wasn't working for our family. So I bought this book and really liked the idea of customizing your strategies based on your child's personality. My husband and I learned a great deal about our older son's temperament through the quiz and relevant chapters. Our son is now potty trained, thanks to the tips and techniques outlined in this book. We are so happy, and we feel like we can use the knowledge we gained about his personality in this book with future lessons and behavioral issues.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz Stoneking

    I was feeling pretty good about this book, until I finished my kids personality quiz. Surprise! I have the “stubborn child”. While not remotely shocked, I was annoyed that it’s main tailor made suggestion for my little savage and myself was to “wait until they are ready.” The techniques for getting started just didn’t exist. My child still won’t put a single drop of pee in the toilet.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Salisbury

    Mostly useful for thinking about your child's individual mindset and personality as the directive for how to approach potty training. Mostly useful for thinking about your child's individual mindset and personality as the directive for how to approach potty training.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katerina

    I got this as an audiobook. As a Registered Dietitian, I couldn't stand the fact that food (ice cream parties) are suggested as a reward for not using a diaper. Not only rewards and punishments do not work in the long run (I suggest the book Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn for the author to read), food in particular is a very, very bad idea. It can create a complex relationship with food in adulthood and kids should not be punished or rewarded with food. Restricting the child's water intake be I got this as an audiobook. As a Registered Dietitian, I couldn't stand the fact that food (ice cream parties) are suggested as a reward for not using a diaper. Not only rewards and punishments do not work in the long run (I suggest the book Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn for the author to read), food in particular is a very, very bad idea. It can create a complex relationship with food in adulthood and kids should not be punished or rewarded with food. Restricting the child's water intake before bedtime, in case that they are thirsty, is also a bad idea. As a parent, I couldn't get past the manipulation tactics suggested in order eg to get a child to run around naked. I still can't understand why I have to tell my kid that there aren't any clean clothes and that he has to be naked for the day because of that. I am sure I could come up with another idea, without having to lie to him. I really didn't want to spend my time listening to it and I just returned it. I believe that the practical suggestions do make sense, but how you implement them during the potty training also plays a great role. Regarding the word pee-pee as mentioned in other comments, yeah, I would prefer another word but if this was the only problem with the book, I wouldn't really mind. The speed of reading was ok for me, someone is mentioning that it is too slow, but I am not a native English speaker so I really enjoyed the pace. However, mistakes are made during the narration and they aren't corrected and it would be more helpful if the questions that we have to answer during the personality test were numbered, therefore more clear. Again, those are for me minor points and I wouldn't really mind if the book wasn't offering such advice. One star.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    A good start in my toilet-training research. I like the idea of using my child's personality to guide the process along and to have lots of personality-geared tips to help me remain a little calmer through this process. It does only give guidelines for the slow and steady approach to toilet training and does not really cover the fast-track method if that is your cup of tea. I did not think it went through the step-by-step very well, though. It talks about focusing only on the skill of peeing in A good start in my toilet-training research. I like the idea of using my child's personality to guide the process along and to have lots of personality-geared tips to help me remain a little calmer through this process. It does only give guidelines for the slow and steady approach to toilet training and does not really cover the fast-track method if that is your cup of tea. I did not think it went through the step-by-step very well, though. It talks about focusing only on the skill of peeing in the toilet but pooping in the toilet is an advanced skill and should wait until later to focus on. With them being against pull-up type training pants, I'm not really sure what I'm supposed to do when my child needs to poop during naked time when I'm just focusing on the peeing in the toilet. Do I let them just poop wherever, am I supposed to keep them in diapers that I take on and off, do I put a diaper on just for pooping and then take it right off? They never really delved into the minute details of the process. As a first-time parent, those kinds of what-ifs stress me out a little and that is not the purpose of the book. I did not like that they made a pretty good stand on using anatomically correct terms for body parts but then referred to urination as "pee-pee" throughout the whole book. That term just seems so babyish when we are trying to be a little more correct and factual. Maybe it just grates at me a little and that's why I don't think it should be used. I think just using "pee" would be fine.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This is the best potty training book (out of 3) that I've read. I love that they teach different approaches to potty training and acknowledge that not every child should be trained in the same way. I also appreciated that they referenced research done on potty training. The authors' experience with children and childhood psychology is helpful, and reading this book made me realize that a lot of potty training is a mind game with your kids. The book was not comprehensive, so there are things that This is the best potty training book (out of 3) that I've read. I love that they teach different approaches to potty training and acknowledge that not every child should be trained in the same way. I also appreciated that they referenced research done on potty training. The authors' experience with children and childhood psychology is helpful, and reading this book made me realize that a lot of potty training is a mind game with your kids. The book was not comprehensive, so there are things that you can learn about potty training from other books. Specifically, Jamie Glowacki's "Oh Crap! Potty Training" gives a more in-depth look at training younger children and training them more quickly, though her method only trains certain personality types quickly. I also appreciate that this book gives weight to constipation, which is a common complication to potty training.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

    Slightly too fluffy for me because I wanted coherent clear laid out steps to potty training. I ended up skimming it. This book is more laissez-faire about potty training and encourages you to decipher what kind of personality your child has before deciding which chapter to use for the general approach. But this isn't helpful if you have a kid with several of the personality traits, including goal-based, impulsive, internalizer, etc. The book is a lot more lenient with the perfect window to potty Slightly too fluffy for me because I wanted coherent clear laid out steps to potty training. I ended up skimming it. This book is more laissez-faire about potty training and encourages you to decipher what kind of personality your child has before deciding which chapter to use for the general approach. But this isn't helpful if you have a kid with several of the personality traits, including goal-based, impulsive, internalizer, etc. The book is a lot more lenient with the perfect window to potty training and seems to advocate training your child later rather than earlier, whereas other authors like Jamie Glowacki really champions potty training as early as possible (or at least within the 20-30 month window of age).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Megan Deffner

    Favorite Potty Training Method! I’ve read a few different potty training books and endless blog posts on various methods. This is by far my favorite as it explains that there’s several “right” options and you should figure out what matters to your family most. Each child is different and responds differently and I think it’s great how they examine the changes to help based on child personality.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Why I Hated This Book: Trashy magazine quiz for your kid’s potty training personality. Groan!! The constant use of the word ‘pee-pee’ Inane example conversations between example parents and kids - these drove me nuts. I disliked every one of these imagined people. Why I Liked This Book: Page 26 - the data-filled Table 1 was useful

  13. 4 out of 5

    N Serena Kyper

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have honestly found this to be one of the most helpful books so far. Now given, my five year is still in pull-ups (she is delayed), it has opened my eyes to different techniques. I love how they break it down differently for different children. Many books I found had that 'one fits all' mentality. Definitely worth a read for those struggling or just starting out. I have honestly found this to be one of the most helpful books so far. Now given, my five year is still in pull-ups (she is delayed), it has opened my eyes to different techniques. I love how they break it down differently for different children. Many books I found had that 'one fits all' mentality. Definitely worth a read for those struggling or just starting out.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A casual, informative, easy to read help book. I like the universal strategies for teaching and how different personalities will take to those strategies differently. It is a calm, nonjudgmental perspective - feels like a rare treat in potty training lit. Still pretty general - I can see how this approach could take months.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Good book to flip through that is based on training your child using advantages from their personality. It didn’t tell me anything new in the training process, but I am glad that I was able to determine that my child was Goal Oriented with a mix of Strong Will hooray for me).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Too many words. When your child is peeing on the floor, you need quick tips and infographics. And perhaps an outstanding preschool teacher who kind of does the hard work for you. ;)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Haven't potty trained yet, so that's the caveat. Thought this was an interesting but perhaps somewhat limiting way to look at your child's personality. Haven't potty trained yet, so that's the caveat. Thought this was an interesting but perhaps somewhat limiting way to look at your child's personality.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Sparks

    Comprehensive.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gülsüm Öztürk

    The book classifies children according to their behaviour I think this is nonsense because human are more complicated than this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    futuregypsy

    Fairly repetitive, but the book had some useful tips.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Trapp

    Good info. Now let's see if it works. Haha Good info. Now let's see if it works. Haha

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie H

    This book has an interesting chart detailing toilet training skills and what age they are typically obtained. There are almost 30 skills involved in toilet training.....

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Scannella

    Really good tips! Much better IMO than Oh Crap. I prefer Sara Au's tone and approach. Really good tips! Much better IMO than Oh Crap. I prefer Sara Au's tone and approach.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leila Reads

    I'll admit that I'm probably not the best person to give an impartial review of this book. The potty training philosopy advocated by this book goes against my personal ideas about the subject, which I have come by from reading extensively about natural infant hygene (elimination communication) and the work of John Rosemond. Stress-Free Potty Training suggests that potty training can be made simpler and (of course) less stressful by understanding your child's temperament and following their sugges I'll admit that I'm probably not the best person to give an impartial review of this book. The potty training philosopy advocated by this book goes against my personal ideas about the subject, which I have come by from reading extensively about natural infant hygene (elimination communication) and the work of John Rosemond. Stress-Free Potty Training suggests that potty training can be made simpler and (of course) less stressful by understanding your child's temperament and following their suggestions to construct a plan based on that temperament. The authors have even included a nifty quiz, just in case you don't know your child that well (insert eye roll here). I have two major problems with this book. The first is the "readiness" model it employs: the idea that a child should not begin potty training until he/she shows certain signs of readiness. Failure to wait until this readiness point allegedly leads to severe psychological consequences. Said readiness rarely presents prior to the age of 2 1/2. So, most of the population born before T. Berry Brazelton's work changed the face of potty training has severe psychological trauma? My husband was completely potty trained by age 2. I assure you he's fine. My other issue with this book is the chart from a study on potty training that the authors use to justify their position on beginning potty training at least after the age of 2 1/2. The chart lists the median age at which children master a list of potty training skills. The first skills begin at age 22 months. The skills listed include staying poop free at night, which my son did well before his first birthday. The authors suggest that parents use this timeline to determine when to move through each state of the process. This is a clear misuse of the chart. The authors fail to acknowledge the flaw in their reasoning, which is that they assume that the timeline is appropriate. They do not provide details on how the study was conducted. Did the parents of the children in the study even begin introducing such things as potty words prior to 22 months? Such questions negate the value of the chart as a potty training guide. My son is 18 months old, wears underwear except at night, and is 80% accident- free during the day, including naps. I used no force or coercion of any kind, and he enjoys not peeing and pooping in his pants (he gets very upset if he has a poop accident, which has happened only twice in the month since he started wearing underwear). Save yourself some grief and stress and get yourself a copy of Toilet Training Without Tantrums by John Rosemond and get your little one out of diapers within the potty training sweet spot of 18-24 months. Leave It

  25. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    Stress-Free Potty Training: A Commonsense Guide to Finding the Right Approach for Your Child is a potty training guide based on the standard approach in the US of waiting until your child is ready. It identifies five personality types: the goal-directed child, the sensory-oriented child, the internalizer, the impulsive child, and the strong-willed child. Most of the book discusses how to tailor your toilet training technique to each of the five personality types. The very first chapter in the bo Stress-Free Potty Training: A Commonsense Guide to Finding the Right Approach for Your Child is a potty training guide based on the standard approach in the US of waiting until your child is ready. It identifies five personality types: the goal-directed child, the sensory-oriented child, the internalizer, the impulsive child, and the strong-willed child. Most of the book discusses how to tailor your toilet training technique to each of the five personality types. The very first chapter in the book is a quiz to help you determine what personality type your child is. But, what happens if your child doesn’t fit into ANY of those categories? My son likes the sense of accomplishment and praise, but is also willing to give up easily. So, not goal-oriented. He is not sensitive at all to fabrics, noise, or water temperature. So, not sensory-oriented. He is most definitely willing to explore away from his parents. So, not an internalizer. He is quite active (what toddler isn’t?), but he can also sit still and flip through a book or color for some time. So, not impulsive. He likes to be independent and doesn’t like to be told “no” (what child does?), but his tantrums are over quickly and his attention can be easily re-directed. So, not strong-willed. So, now what? This book is so focused on tailoring potty training for each of these five personality types that I found this book to be useless. After the quizzes in the first chapter, there is a chapter on readiness and a chapter on universal strategies. Following those are five individual chapters on each of the five personality types. Frankly, it was too boring and inapplicable to me for me to read through all of those five chapters; I merely skimmed. If your child happens to fit one of these five personality types, then this book might be worth checking out. If not, then skip it. The information isn’t bad. The general philosophy is an easy going, stress free one with an emphasis that you should not pressure or reprimand your child. That seems sensible enough. But, I think there are better books out there on potty training. If you want something that is gentle, stress free, and easy going, then I recommend Pantley’s The No-Cry Potty Training Solution: Gentle Ways to Help Your Child Say Good-Bye to Diapers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    As far as potty training books go, this was far more up my alley than anything else I've picked up. I would recommend reading it when your first is close to two and you start to feel the inevitable peer pressure to get the job done. Just realize, kids at this age don't actually care what other kids are doing most of the time (and especially don't care what their parents think they should do!) I loved that the basis of the book was discovering when YOUR child is ready and using cues about their p As far as potty training books go, this was far more up my alley than anything else I've picked up. I would recommend reading it when your first is close to two and you start to feel the inevitable peer pressure to get the job done. Just realize, kids at this age don't actually care what other kids are doing most of the time (and especially don't care what their parents think they should do!) I loved that the basis of the book was discovering when YOUR child is ready and using cues about their personality to emphasize certain strategies over others. They were completely up front that some kids take longer to put all the pieces together. There was a helpful chart in the front of about 25 individual steps in the process and approximate ages you might see that happen - from not having a poop while sleeping to wiping themselves. There's a big range! I can't say that I found any killer strategies but it did lessen my mommy guilt for not having a potty training intensive with my 2 1/2 year old and instead give positive reinforcement and teach him to recognize what his body is doing. Sure, it's maybe a longer process but it's less stressful and more enjoyable as a life. We may employ some of the more direct strategies they shared as time goes on - drinking more fluids or specific rewards for periods of dryness. The authors were big on nakedness training so the child can see what's happening when it surprises them for all character types. I just don't have the stomach or cleaning motivation for it. My favorite part was how they emphasized that over directness by parents can cause extra resistance from the toddler, thus extending the whole potty training timeline. Our first experience to a T!!! So, when you start to feel overwhelmed by other parents talking about how their 18 month old is so ready and they are going to stay at home for weeks to make this happen: pick up Stress-Free Potty Training, decide how you actually want to parent, remember what your kid needs, and make a confident plan of action.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joannah Keats

    This book does not provide a formula for potty-training, so if you're looking for a checklist solution this is not the book for you. The most useful information I found in this book was the assessment of your child's personality type and using that knowledge to shape the way you approach potty training. Beyond that, this truly is a "commonsense guide" as the cover states. With the exception of "Nakedtime" as a recommended method for all personality types, everything else is pretty instinctual - This book does not provide a formula for potty-training, so if you're looking for a checklist solution this is not the book for you. The most useful information I found in this book was the assessment of your child's personality type and using that knowledge to shape the way you approach potty training. Beyond that, this truly is a "commonsense guide" as the cover states. With the exception of "Nakedtime" as a recommended method for all personality types, everything else is pretty instinctual - modeling bathroom behavior, positive reinforcement, calm reactions to accidents, etc. I was much more interested in this book when I first bought it last year and my son was only 18 months old and was just beginning to wrap my head around the idea of needing to train him in the semi-distant future and wanted to get a sense of what I would be in for. Now that he's over 2 1/2, this book served more to organize my thoughts and to focus on my son's personality as I try and figure out how to tackle this next milestone in his life without traumatizing him with my inexperience. If you're looking for a liaissez-faire, no right or wrong-way guide to help you determine the best way to approach potty training for your child, you will probably find this book useful. But if you're hoping for a "Potty Train Your Kid In Under A Week!"-type deal, you will be sorely disappointed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tami

    Potty training can be a very difficult experience for children and parents alike. Everyone has a friend or cousin whose kid was fully potty trained by 18 months. Then, there’s the “helpful” unsolicited advice that everyone seems to provide when your kid reaches their second birthday and they still aren’t trained. None of this seems to help, in fact it often hinders progress. Stress-Free Potty Training looks at two things. First, is your child really ready to train? Second, what is the best appro Potty training can be a very difficult experience for children and parents alike. Everyone has a friend or cousin whose kid was fully potty trained by 18 months. Then, there’s the “helpful” unsolicited advice that everyone seems to provide when your kid reaches their second birthday and they still aren’t trained. None of this seems to help, in fact it often hinders progress. Stress-Free Potty Training looks at two things. First, is your child really ready to train? Second, what is the best approach for your particular child? It is this second aspect that I found most useful. Most potty training books focus on the child that simply needs to be shown what to do, encouraged, and magically potty training is complete. My little one, on the other hand, is strong willed and impulsive. He’ll catch on very quickly and then just refuse as if he’s bored with the whole process. Moreover, I could leave his diaper on until it drooped to his knees and he couldn’t care less. Now, after reading this book, I am armed with some knowledge and a few strategies. We were already quite scheduled but I have been modeling. He seems quite interested in that and has even came over and sat on the potty. Definitely a step in the right direction.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    The first chapter of this book has you take a test to identify your child's personality type and then asks a few questions to get you thinking about how you, as a parent, would respond to potty training issues. The next chapter gives advice on determining readiness followed by a chapter with universal potty training strategies. The following five chapters go through each personality type (goal-directed, sensory-oriented, internalizer, impulsive, and strong-willed). The last chapter discusses int The first chapter of this book has you take a test to identify your child's personality type and then asks a few questions to get you thinking about how you, as a parent, would respond to potty training issues. The next chapter gives advice on determining readiness followed by a chapter with universal potty training strategies. The following five chapters go through each personality type (goal-directed, sensory-oriented, internalizer, impulsive, and strong-willed). The last chapter discusses interruptions and setbacks. I thought this book was very helpful; by knowing my child's personality type(s) I was able to see how certain suggestions would work. There was not a lot of fluff, a few examples, but basically the authors got right to the point. However, I would really like a book on potty training from a christian perspective. While there were lots of suggestions that were helpful (and we're already seeing them work!) there was also a lot that pointed to indulging your child. I could see how using these strategies you could push your child to demonstrate her personality type more, which I don't think is a good thing. But, hopefully we will be able to sort through all of that and still be successful!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin Ching

    The thing I really liked about this book is that it acknowledged the possibility that your kid will offer resistance to the potty training process. Most books lay out a plan, like put them in underwear and have them try the potty every 30 minutes; be consistent; stay positive. But they do not address the possibility that your kid might fiercely resist every step of the process, and then you have to choose between being consistent (ie carrying your kicking and screaming child to the bathroom) or The thing I really liked about this book is that it acknowledged the possibility that your kid will offer resistance to the potty training process. Most books lay out a plan, like put them in underwear and have them try the potty every 30 minutes; be consistent; stay positive. But they do not address the possibility that your kid might fiercely resist every step of the process, and then you have to choose between being consistent (ie carrying your kicking and screaming child to the bathroom) or being positive (letting them choose not to use the toilet when they don't want to, and then dealing with a string of accidents). It was helpful to think about how your child might think about the whole process, based on their personality. (My child, probably like many others, has elements of multiple types, but i got ideas from each of those chapters.) I would have liked more practical suggestions to go along with the psychological analysis - that's the only reason for taking off one star. This is probably the most helpful potty training book I've read (out of 6) and it leaves me feeling the most encouraged that we will get there eventually.

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