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Cook's Country Cookbook

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Welcome to Cook's Country--a place where you'll learn what's cooking in kitchens across America. This debut collection from the editors of Cook's Country magazine celebrates the landscape of American home cooking from yesterday and today. In the tradition of great American cookbooks like The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and The Settlement Cookbook, The Cook's Country Cookbook is Welcome to Cook's Country--a place where you'll learn what's cooking in kitchens across America. This debut collection from the editors of Cook's Country magazine celebrates the landscape of American home cooking from yesterday and today. In the tradition of great American cookbooks like The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and The Settlement Cookbook, The Cook's Country Cookbook is, at its core, a wide-ranging, comprehensive collection chock-full of beloved classics like roast chicken, beef stew, biscuits, blueberry pie, and more. In addition, the editors of Cook's Country magazine have also reached back in time to revive old favorites to suit modern tastes and lifestyles. Here you'll find Chicken Divan without the soup mix--only tender chicken and crisp broccoli blanketed in a velvety cheese sauce. You'll learn that it's possible to serve a from-scratch comfort food classic like meatloaf on a weeknight when time is tight: our mini-meatloaves cook in a fraction of the time of traditional versions. Discover fresh, new, and sometimes regional recipes that illuminate the depth and personality behind American cooking--recipes such as North Carolina Pulled Pork (a slow-cooker dish with real barbecue flavor); 24-Hour Salad (a make-ahead salad where the vegetables remain crisp and fresh); and King Ranch Casserole (a kid-friendly creamy chicken casserole with toasty corn chips and Southwestern spices, made famous by Lady Bird Johnson). In addition to foolproof recipes, The Cook's Country Cookbook also pulls back the curtain to reveal the often fascinating origins of classic American favorites, such as the use of breakfast cereal in party snack mixes or how Bundt pans gave rise to the popular cake. Muchmore than a collection of foolproof recipes, The Cook's Country Cookbook provides a lively, in-depth portrait of the great American table.


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Welcome to Cook's Country--a place where you'll learn what's cooking in kitchens across America. This debut collection from the editors of Cook's Country magazine celebrates the landscape of American home cooking from yesterday and today. In the tradition of great American cookbooks like The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and The Settlement Cookbook, The Cook's Country Cookbook is Welcome to Cook's Country--a place where you'll learn what's cooking in kitchens across America. This debut collection from the editors of Cook's Country magazine celebrates the landscape of American home cooking from yesterday and today. In the tradition of great American cookbooks like The Fannie Farmer Cookbook and The Settlement Cookbook, The Cook's Country Cookbook is, at its core, a wide-ranging, comprehensive collection chock-full of beloved classics like roast chicken, beef stew, biscuits, blueberry pie, and more. In addition, the editors of Cook's Country magazine have also reached back in time to revive old favorites to suit modern tastes and lifestyles. Here you'll find Chicken Divan without the soup mix--only tender chicken and crisp broccoli blanketed in a velvety cheese sauce. You'll learn that it's possible to serve a from-scratch comfort food classic like meatloaf on a weeknight when time is tight: our mini-meatloaves cook in a fraction of the time of traditional versions. Discover fresh, new, and sometimes regional recipes that illuminate the depth and personality behind American cooking--recipes such as North Carolina Pulled Pork (a slow-cooker dish with real barbecue flavor); 24-Hour Salad (a make-ahead salad where the vegetables remain crisp and fresh); and King Ranch Casserole (a kid-friendly creamy chicken casserole with toasty corn chips and Southwestern spices, made famous by Lady Bird Johnson). In addition to foolproof recipes, The Cook's Country Cookbook also pulls back the curtain to reveal the often fascinating origins of classic American favorites, such as the use of breakfast cereal in party snack mixes or how Bundt pans gave rise to the popular cake. Muchmore than a collection of foolproof recipes, The Cook's Country Cookbook provides a lively, in-depth portrait of the great American table.

30 review for Cook's Country Cookbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Every recipe is practical and comes with a at least a few paragraphs of tips to make the process easier. Nearly all of the recipes I have tried have been worth making again.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dixie Diamond

    My opinion: They completely missed the boat on grilled cheese. It has to be sourdough bread. Sourdough with sharp Cheddar is the only way to go. Okay, this is actually a pretty good homestyle cookbook, but--and I've said this before--I often find the degree to which America's Test Kitchen alters traditional recipes in the name of "improvement" somewhat disturbing. I already griped about their obsession with dairy fat and their poor grasp of some regional fare in my review of America's Best Lost R My opinion: They completely missed the boat on grilled cheese. It has to be sourdough bread. Sourdough with sharp Cheddar is the only way to go. Okay, this is actually a pretty good homestyle cookbook, but--and I've said this before--I often find the degree to which America's Test Kitchen alters traditional recipes in the name of "improvement" somewhat disturbing. I already griped about their obsession with dairy fat and their poor grasp of some regional fare in my review of America's Best Lost Recipes, so I'll spare you a repeat of that. This is not a particularly "quick" cookbook. This is neither a positive or a negative, it's just a thing. I, personally, would have to save these for more-leisurely weekend cooking. I think this is probably a good cookbook for some basics and the baked items, but I'd want second opinions on regional specialties. As follows: I'd love to know from what sources they were selecting their regional test recipes. I don't know much about Midwestern or Northeastern regional cooking, so I won't comment, but I had the disquieting feeling that, when it came to Southern and Southwestern recipes, ATK was operating in a vacuum, though maybe this was because of the way the introductions to the recipes were written. Why the heck didn't they just call up somebody down South and get some real expertise? If you want gumbo, skip this and go to River Road Recipes or the Gumbo Pages. ATK actually disparaged both okra and filé as "acquired tastes" and said their testers preferred gumbo without either, which means their tasters don't know anything about gumbo. Oh, and "filé" is usually pronounced "FEE-lay," despite the accent mark. They actually mentioned trying to make chili with sausage, which is just weird. Texas Cooking features several chili recipes, some of them championship winners, and none of them involve sausage. I don't know that I've ever seen a chili recipes that involved sausage, unless it used a little for seasoning. Why would they even attempt this? Not that I'm a total chili snob, but it makes me wonder how far off they were with the recipes with which I am less familiar (so I don't even know they were that far off). Nor do many chili recipes, at least in Texas, involve pork, except for a little bacon for seasoning. Anything called "Ranch Chili" had better be made with beef (or possibly venison or bison). Cattle are raised on ranches, pigs are raised on farms. Ditto cowboy beans: It seems not to have occurred to ATK that, instead of being Westernized Boston baked beans, they might be Americanized charro beans, which are not sweet. I have plenty of regional (Texas) cookbooks with bean recipes that do not involve much, if any, sweetener. Sweet "cowboy beans" seem to me to be the product of the Hollywood-cowboy-obsessed 1950's marketing of canned beans-and-weenies. Finally, they continue to be mystified by Southern cornbread. Cornbread is supposed to be a sponge for something else, and around here it's often chili or beans. It's supposed to taste like cornmeal, not fresh kernel corn, which is what you put in corn pudding, and not like a freakin' cupcake, like Northern cornbread. Also, making cornbread with buttermilk is not an ATK flash of genius. Lots of old recipes use buttermilk.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tina Hayes

    I'm very happy to have this new cookbook and think I'll get quite a bit of use out of it in years to come. This comprehensive volume has recipes of all kinds, including salads, snacks, side dishes, lunch, breakfast foods, potluck favorites, bread, slow-cooker meals, and a myriad of desserts. The thing that makes this particular cookbook stand out to me is the extra writing for nearly every recipe. Not only are there variations on most of them, the authors at the test kitchen also added things ab I'm very happy to have this new cookbook and think I'll get quite a bit of use out of it in years to come. This comprehensive volume has recipes of all kinds, including salads, snacks, side dishes, lunch, breakfast foods, potluck favorites, bread, slow-cooker meals, and a myriad of desserts. The thing that makes this particular cookbook stand out to me is the extra writing for nearly every recipe. Not only are there variations on most of them, the authors at the test kitchen also added things about the history of the recipes, regional origins, and handy cooking tips and pointers. For example, take something as simple as chopped salad. By reading the entry in "The Cook's Country Cookbook", I learn that this dish that was so popular during the 50s was "...designed to be easy to eat using only a fork while balancing the plate on top of your knees." The segment goes on to discuss the best vegetables to use and how to cut them, which greens are best, details of the dressing, and serving presentation. All that is before we even read the actual recipe! Along with basic chopped salad, two variations are given for this classic favorite: chopped salad with fennel, green apples, and radishes and chopped salad with avacado, jicama, and cucumber. Bits of trivia sprinkled throughout are a fun bonus. Who would have thought that a molasses spill could have killed so many people in Boston in 1919? And if you ever wanted to know how Anadama bread got it's name, that is covered, too. Though I would have liked to see more meat-free main dishes, this is a great cookbook that would be very useful in most kitchens. I think it would also make a great gift.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I love this cookbook. I may not make every recipe the way they recommend, but every recipe has more information than is usually given in an ordinary cookbook. I like knowing why they recommend using a certain kind of cornmeal, what each reason they add an unusual ingredient to a recipe, and why they left out an ingredient that would traditionally be used (like soy sauce in the shepherd's pie instead of Worcestershire sauce). I am an improviser in the kitchen, with food allergies in the house I h I love this cookbook. I may not make every recipe the way they recommend, but every recipe has more information than is usually given in an ordinary cookbook. I like knowing why they recommend using a certain kind of cornmeal, what each reason they add an unusual ingredient to a recipe, and why they left out an ingredient that would traditionally be used (like soy sauce in the shepherd's pie instead of Worcestershire sauce). I am an improviser in the kitchen, with food allergies in the house I have always had to change every recipe I've used. This book gives me insight into how some ingredients change the foods I cook. I have found myself just sitting on the sofa reading this cookbook when I don't plan to cook anything. I would never cook everything the way they recommend, but I don't do that with any cookbook anyway, and this one has more information to go along with the recipes to make it the favorite cookbook on my shelf.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This cookbook is for people who enjoy the process of cooking...the recipes aren't the kind you can slap on the table in 20 minutes after work. Instead, the test kitchen takes a recipe and figures out what need to be done to make it taste its absolute best. The testing process and recipe origins are described for each recipe, so it's still a great cookbook for those of us who like reading more than cooking (*cough*), and the stuff that's been cooked (granted: *for* me, not *by* me) out of it has This cookbook is for people who enjoy the process of cooking...the recipes aren't the kind you can slap on the table in 20 minutes after work. Instead, the test kitchen takes a recipe and figures out what need to be done to make it taste its absolute best. The testing process and recipe origins are described for each recipe, so it's still a great cookbook for those of us who like reading more than cooking (*cough*), and the stuff that's been cooked (granted: *for* me, not *by* me) out of it has turned out great. There's also glossy pictures, score!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Gee

    More solid writing and recipes from the America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated crew. Maybe they're not everyone's style by I always appreciate the detailed trial and error that leads them to the recipe. More solid writing and recipes from the America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated crew. Maybe they're not everyone's style by I always appreciate the detailed trial and error that leads them to the recipe.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This cookbook has more than a few recipes I want to try, usually there might be one. May even have to buy this for my collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deana

    If you just Tried and True recipes, Cooks Country is a go to cookbook. I cook out of this one regularly.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Great reference cookbook. Contains wide variety of practical, easy to prepare, tasty foods with ingredients that are easy to find. Great book to have on hand as a "go-to". Great reference cookbook. Contains wide variety of practical, easy to prepare, tasty foods with ingredients that are easy to find. Great book to have on hand as a "go-to".

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liz De Coster

    Good, classic, basic recipes. Great if, like me, you find Cook's Illustrated reliable and interesting but sometimes overly fussy. Good, classic, basic recipes. Great if, like me, you find Cook's Illustrated reliable and interesting but sometimes overly fussy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This one would be worth having on your shelf!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    There are some great cake recipes in this book and they don’t seem too complicated.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peytie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lori Laurent Smith

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Morris

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mia

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jon Evans

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Lee Elkins Sr

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Dickerson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris.wells

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nichole

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lola

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ruth McKinley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cristy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

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