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Subterfuge Sobriety: A Collection of Absurdist Poetry

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SUBTERFUGE SOBRIETY is a collection of obscene poems, songs, and pieces of prose that reflect on the abstruseness of modern literature, the chaotic political climate of new millennium, and the absurdist nature of life. Some may call it charming and deep. Others may call it pervasive and degenerate. It’s all of the above- and more! So, if you are in the mood for disturbing SUBTERFUGE SOBRIETY is a collection of obscene poems, songs, and pieces of prose that reflect on the abstruseness of modern literature, the chaotic political climate of new millennium, and the absurdist nature of life. Some may call it charming and deep. Others may call it pervasive and degenerate. It’s all of the above- and more! So, if you are in the mood for disturbing nonsense, this book might be your cup of tea or coffee or whatever floats your boat.


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SUBTERFUGE SOBRIETY is a collection of obscene poems, songs, and pieces of prose that reflect on the abstruseness of modern literature, the chaotic political climate of new millennium, and the absurdist nature of life. Some may call it charming and deep. Others may call it pervasive and degenerate. It’s all of the above- and more! So, if you are in the mood for disturbing SUBTERFUGE SOBRIETY is a collection of obscene poems, songs, and pieces of prose that reflect on the abstruseness of modern literature, the chaotic political climate of new millennium, and the absurdist nature of life. Some may call it charming and deep. Others may call it pervasive and degenerate. It’s all of the above- and more! So, if you are in the mood for disturbing nonsense, this book might be your cup of tea or coffee or whatever floats your boat.

33 review for Subterfuge Sobriety: A Collection of Absurdist Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Porzenheim

    From ‘Serpentine My Turpentine: A True Story’: So, good night dear humans. Lock your doors! For Reagan will crawl on all fours And all will be lost… ...Unless we bring out… The Sandals! I was given a copy of this book of poetry to review by the author. As earlier drafts of parts of the present work were shown to me, I am not so divorced from the completed work as I normally am when I review. Therefore, I do not feel it would be productive or useful to write this review like any other. This will be a bo From ‘Serpentine My Turpentine: A True Story’: So, good night dear humans. Lock your doors! For Reagan will crawl on all fours And all will be lost… ...Unless we bring out… The Sandals! I was given a copy of this book of poetry to review by the author. As earlier drafts of parts of the present work were shown to me, I am not so divorced from the completed work as I normally am when I review. Therefore, I do not feel it would be productive or useful to write this review like any other. This will be a book review as much as it will be an exhortation to friends since I know the author, editor, and illustrator personally. This book is a collection of poems and illustrations. Connor Doyle’s poems are accompanied by the illustrations of Michael Barrow. Both the poems and the illustrations match each other, and enhance the musical, whimsical and profane feeling to this collection of poetry. There are two kinds of poem in this collection. The longer and the shorter. The longer run from around 45-100 lines on average, and usually contain a story. The shorter poems average 4-10 lines, and remind me of jingles or nursery rhymes. One of Doyle’s greatest strengths is the imagery he creates. This can be seen most easily in the longer poems where he tells a story and sticks with an image for a while, allowing the abstract connections to build together towards a concrete if fantastical image. I will allow Doyle’s poetry to speak for itself: here is a small section from one of my favorite poems in this collection called ‘To Take Upon Our Inner Embraces: A Reflection on Ambiguous Intimacy’: The rabbits scurry out of their mounds in the earth Trampling each other, thousands of rabbits Stampede through the streets, Bobbing their heads in syncopation To the shrieks of the eagles above. Too Late! The Arrow strikes! Parris gawks from his shining tower of Ilium. The fresh cony breaks its black, and slips down to the ground, darkened by Death. Fear not, Son of Lepus, the black pool of omniscience, For we shall guide thee to the cycle of karmic existence. I think that Doyle would benefit from trusting his imagistic instincts more. His extended similes and images shine out wherever he places them, and sometimes it seems like is rushing off to the next image too soon. There are interesting ideas being tossed around that I would love to see more developed. For example: From ‘The Mustache Song.’ Thoreau on the bagpipes, Descartes at the drums, Hegel writing hoppy-cock with only his thumbs From ‘Fuck Off and Drown in the Thames’ The color of friendship turns green to the touch With slick-silver dollar disease Both poems from which I drew these two examples, actually seem to contain advice on how to read, or sing them in the subtitles. ‘The Mustache Song:(In the Pin Tin Alley Style)' and ‘Fuck Off and Drown in the Thames: (In a familiar melody.)' Not all the poems have recommendations in the title, but some actually have chorus lines within them that are marked as such. At some level, this was distracting for me. It left me wishing that Doyle recorded the poems and released these ones as songs, because to me it seems that their fun comes in their musical qualities, and I found myself worrying I might be missing something in my own delivery. Regardless, It’s clear that Doyle’s put great work in here. Of particular interest is the beginning to a faux epic poem called ‘the Naptoramorialas.’ It's the longest poem in the collection and it best shows Doyle’s ability to tell a story with imagistic clarity. Here's a small bit: Upon hearing the mother’s naming of her child, so rare and pure,/ The Great Shamanistic Alpaca descended from the mountain/Proclaiming to the novice, “You vile, presumptuous twit!”/“This is no child of copulation, too mortal too defer!”// “For this is the Chosen Son of Unapproachable Verbosity.”/“He shall save the plentiful fields from Malnutrition, Wrath, and/Fire”/“You are not worthy to wallow at his Most Scrupulous Style!”/“And for petty ignorance, I SMITE THEE!”// Immediately a forceful wind flew through the mother’s body,/Causing it to collapse within itself into a Pernicious Void/Of blackness and strange divination./Within seconds, Karlanot was no more./Only the rutabagas she previously plucked remained,// Approaching the Shamanistic prophet, the infant Kapernahm/Pondered, “Great Thinker, why have you destroyed the only kin”/ “I had in this peculiar world. Her choices were rash, but what hu-/man”/“Does not make rash choices? Explain, O Great Perspective Fleecy/One." I’d love to see more poems like this. I think Doyle naturally excels with his imagistic style in the longer story based poems. In all the poems the tone is whimsical, musical, and even on occasion, political. It is as if Lewis-Carrol had been listening to They Might Be Giants opining on Hindu philosophy after reading the Iliad. It certainly isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, as the back cover acknowledges, but I enjoyed it and I recommend it to those looking for a chuckle with some abstract profane poetry. I look forward to seeing where Doyle goes with his poetry, and I hope he learns to rely more on his ample imagistic instincts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Wachtel

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jamie B

  5. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  6. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manda

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Schneider

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melly Mel

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lorra

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Atkinson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  14. 5 out of 5

    Edgar Connell

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Gunning

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol McFarlane

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Muscat

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Salvaggio

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katharine Adams

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daryl Moad

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kara Lauren

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angela Born

  30. 4 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Mcdaniel

  32. 5 out of 5

    James Lynam

  33. 5 out of 5

    Donna Barney

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