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Disruptive Classroom Technologies: A Framework for Innovation in Education

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Timely and powerful, this book offers a new framework to elevate instructional practices with technology and maximize student learning. The T3 Framework helps teachers categorize students' learning as translational, transformational, or transcendent, sorting through the low-impact applications to reach high-impact usage of technologies. Teachers and leaders will find: Examp Timely and powerful, this book offers a new framework to elevate instructional practices with technology and maximize student learning. The T3 Framework helps teachers categorize students' learning as translational, transformational, or transcendent, sorting through the low-impact applications to reach high-impact usage of technologies. Teachers and leaders will find: Examples of technology use at the translational, transformational, and transcendent levels Activities, guides, and prompts for deeper learning that move technology use to higher levels of the T3 Framework Evaluative rubrics to self-assess current technology use, establish meaningful goals, and track progress towards those goals


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Timely and powerful, this book offers a new framework to elevate instructional practices with technology and maximize student learning. The T3 Framework helps teachers categorize students' learning as translational, transformational, or transcendent, sorting through the low-impact applications to reach high-impact usage of technologies. Teachers and leaders will find: Examp Timely and powerful, this book offers a new framework to elevate instructional practices with technology and maximize student learning. The T3 Framework helps teachers categorize students' learning as translational, transformational, or transcendent, sorting through the low-impact applications to reach high-impact usage of technologies. Teachers and leaders will find: Examples of technology use at the translational, transformational, and transcendent levels Activities, guides, and prompts for deeper learning that move technology use to higher levels of the T3 Framework Evaluative rubrics to self-assess current technology use, establish meaningful goals, and track progress towards those goals

30 review for Disruptive Classroom Technologies: A Framework for Innovation in Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barb Middleton

    I liked the pedagogy in this technology book and application to the classroom and teaching. The framework follows a low-level to high-level skills set defined conceptually as translational, transformative, and transcendent. The transformative section was the most helpful for me in reflecting on lessons and ways to improve them. The transcendent gave me an idea for refining a lesson and the translational was the least helpful. Each area is defined by two criteria. Translational is automation and I liked the pedagogy in this technology book and application to the classroom and teaching. The framework follows a low-level to high-level skills set defined conceptually as translational, transformative, and transcendent. The transformative section was the most helpful for me in reflecting on lessons and ways to improve them. The transcendent gave me an idea for refining a lesson and the translational was the least helpful. Each area is defined by two criteria. Translational is automation and consumption. The author was negative in regards to automation and didn't focus on the value of motivation with technology in low-level skills in the form of addressing different learning styles or even how it helps with English language learners. His main focus was on users of technology tools that are just replacing print, and while this is true, he should have expanded more into how technology can be more than that pedagogically when teaching students low-level skills. The transformative section on production and contribution gave me an "ah-ha" moment when he talked about "class-sourcing", a way to crowd-source with students and use it to build a community of learners. The last section on transcendent uses of technology involved inquiry design and social entrepreneurship. This gave me some ideas on ways to scaffold the inquiry process regarding sources that I teach when students do research. The graphic organizers are helpful and the questions teachers should ask themselves to reflect on their teaching is insightful. This is a quick read and was worthwhile for me professionally.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    If you are reading this review, then you are probably a teacher trying to improve your craft by using technology effectively. In Sonny Magana’s Disruptive Classroom Technologies, there is value to be found and thought-provoking concepts through which to delve, but if you are simply looking for ways to use new technology to maximize student learning in your class, you may not find what you are looking for in this book. If, however, you are an educational ideologist waiting for the whole education If you are reading this review, then you are probably a teacher trying to improve your craft by using technology effectively. In Sonny Magana’s Disruptive Classroom Technologies, there is value to be found and thought-provoking concepts through which to delve, but if you are simply looking for ways to use new technology to maximize student learning in your class, you may not find what you are looking for in this book. If, however, you are an educational ideologist waiting for the whole educational field to adjust to a new world, then this book may be for you. Dr. Anthony J. “Sonny” Magana III, EdD describes himself as an educational futurist, a fitting title for a well-qualified author and educator who is attempting to make broad changes in the educational system. He is the founder of Magana Education, a consulting firm designed to improve educational quality, a Research Associate for Marzano Research where he specializes in enhancing teaching with the use of technology, and has held several positions as principal, teacher, and author. He has a Master’s of Education from City University of Seattle specializing in Educational/Instructional Technology and a Doctoral degree in Educational Leadership from Seattle University. In addition to his educational background, he has co-authored a book, Enhancing the Art and Science of Teaching with Technology, with Dr. Robert Marzano, one of the leading minds in education today. He is clearly well-qualified to speak on this subject of educational technology. The title Disruptive Classroom Technologies may be a bit of a misnomer considering the author does not really discuss much technology in this book. A more appropriate title, in my opinion, would be Disruptive Classroom Practices as Magana attempts to make us look at how we teach, not necessarily how to use tech. In this book, Magana attempts to improve upon the TPACK and SAMR models of technology use. TPACK, according to Magana, “does help establish the importance of technological knowledge for teachers, [yet] it does not provide any guidance or measurable standards to help attain that knowledge.” Additionally, Magana believes that although the SAMR model may be beneficial by creating a hierarchy of levels to attain, the levels are abstract and lack any pedagogical application. Magana attempts to rectify this by creating what he calls the T3 Framework, a 3-level guide for improving technology use in the classroom. The first level of the T3 Framework is the translational category. In this T1 group, Magana puts all of the technological applications we teachers use to make our jobs faster, less complicated, and more automated. Programs such as Google Classroom belong here, as well as learning programs and student research. Essentially all technology use that makes learning/teaching more efficient belongs in this introductory group. T2 is the transformational category which includes the use of technology to change the way we teach and learn, not just make it more productive and competent. Here we have production and contribution aims where the students will use technology to produce their own learning goals and contribute by producing artifacts that not only prove their own learning, but also assist in the learning of others. The ultimate tier, T3, is the transcendent stage. In this category, students are encouraged to plan their own learning, to figure out a solution to a wicked problem, tinker with how to deal with it, and carry out a plan. Magano advises, “When students use technology in transcendent ways, they become their own curriculum mapmakers.” The transcendent stage is pushing the boundaries of what we, and the students, know and attempt to change their world by using technologies in ways nobody may have thought of previously. While self-evaluating, I realize that I am on the bottom, tier 1 translation, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. I can be happy “singing campfire songs” as Magana describes, and continue doing an adequate job, or I can look at the next level to see how to improve. I definitely found some value in analyzing T2 and looking at how to transform my teaching. I have immediately, and excitedly, began implementing some self-evaluation online tools for my students with sharing capabilities of student products. They will use these to teach and help each other, creating a truly special learning environment. That is, if everything goes according to plan (small steps…). I do have some criticisms of the T3 stage. Frankly put, it seems too daunting and inappropriate for my teaching situation. I cannot let the students dictate their own curriculum, I have standards to teach after all. Then again, maybe once I have mastered T2, I will see T3 in a different light. Additionally, I reject Magana’s claim that his T3 Framework has only three stages. I believe he is trying to make it seem easier than it truly is considering that each stage has two subcategories. Overall, there are really six stages, which probably makes it seem more complicated than he wants it to sound. One less hierarchy than SAMR is good for business, right? T3 also has a better sound to it than ACPCIS (automation, consumption, production, contribution, inquiry design, social entrepreneurship), doesn’t it? Overall, I would recommend this book to any teacher who has a firm grip on teaching with technology, but looking to get even stronger. If you are new to teaching with technology and looking for ideas on how to use tech efficiently in the classroom, I would stay away from this one right now. The skills you are looking for are looked down upon by Magana as the first step to change, and you might feel frustrated and overwhelmed by what he has to say. You need basic educational technology skills to survive, and you cannot skip straight to T3, no matter how much you may want to be at the top. In a few years, when you have those skills, come back to Disruptive Classroom Technologies and see how to take it to the next level.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jerianddave Sloane

    Disruptive Classroom Technologies: A Framework for Innovation in Education, by Sonny Magana, is a practical guide to creating classrooms that significantly change the landscape of education. Although many of today’s educators and administrators realize that “old school” teaching paradigms no longer fit today’s learning environment or tomorrow’s educational needs, putting these changes into practice can be difficult and overwhelming. Magana’s book outlines a simple framework, along with guiding Disruptive Classroom Technologies: A Framework for Innovation in Education, by Sonny Magana, is a practical guide to creating classrooms that significantly change the landscape of education. Although many of today’s educators and administrators realize that “old school” teaching paradigms no longer fit today’s learning environment or tomorrow’s educational needs, putting these changes into practice can be difficult and overwhelming. Magana’s book outlines a simple framework, along with guiding questions and reflections that help classroom teachers, administrators and other educational leaders implement educational technology integration practically and with continuous, goal-oriented growth. As Magana points out, “Educational technologies can be either a disruptive innovation or distractive innovation: the dependent variable seems to be the manner in which the technology is used.” (Magana, 2017) There is a short term increase in engagement when a new technology is introduced, but the effects aren’t lasting. Technology should be used to support the construction of knowledge as learners engage in problem-solving, investigation, collaboration, communication and adding new content to existing knowledge. Meaningful context is the key. (Magana, 2017). To increase the value of educational technology, frameworks have been developed to assist educators. These include Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) developed by Michigan State University professors Punya Mishra and Matthew Koehler (1998) and the SAMR Model developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura (2013). I am most accustomed to the SAMR model (substitution, augmentation, modification, and redefinition), but Magana’s T3 Framework provides a simple, yet specific way of analyzing educational technology use, it’s goals and parameters and provides a framework for reflective practices. The T3 Framework provides a more specific and objective way to analyze and implement technology integration. Magana’s previous work is with well-known researcher Robert Manzano. Manzano is famous in education circles as providing practical, research-based strategies that can be used to increase standards-based learning in the classroom. Their book, Enhancing the Art and Science of Teaching with Technology (Magana and Marzano, 2013), provides research analysis and practical strategies for effective integration of technology in the classroom. Magana describes the inspiration that led to his understanding of transcendent education; his students created a virtual field trip to the North Pole, called the Polar Project, and shared it with the world via the International Education and Resource Network (iEARN). Students used email, HTML and the World Wide Web in the mid-90’s when these technologies were not thought of as student-oriented. Although Magana provides a few other examples, he doesn’t linger on self-aggrandizement as is often true with other authors. His book is also not meant as a collection of anecdotes or inspirational stories. The focus is on a simple and practical way to focus on transformative technology integration. The book provides links to materials that educators and administrators can use to observe, reflect and plan their own practice. Magana’s framework is an overarching model that helps educators see the big picture of technology. “T3 is a framework through which we can implement three different domains of educational technology use: translational, transformational, and transcendent.” (Magana, 2017) T1: Translational amounts to substitution, with a certain amount of augmentation when compared with the SAMR model. There are specific elements though: T1.1 Automation and T1.2 Consumption. This is a really practical way for me to explain to teachers I work with, those new to technology, what the basic levels of integration are and why they need to incorporate them. (Yes, there are still teachers who reject frequent technology use by their students unless it is for state testing.) Magana includes guiding questions for translational technology use. For example: Does the technology use result in a time savings? Fewer task-related errors? The number of tasks completed? The attributes of the task’s end product? (Magana, 2017) There are a number of questions, including value indicators such as efficiency, accuracy, quality and quantity, with yes or no responses, which help teachers see the specific goals of technology. Each part of the framework has these as well as reflective questions and “Smart goal” style sentence stems to guide teachers. Happily, these are formatted in simple charts and are not overabundant. There is not an overwhelming dearth of information, but a simply constructed protocol that seems easy to use. His rubrics have only 3 levels; beginning, developing and mastering. I admit I have not yet used the resources, but intend to access the materials (permission has been given within the book by the publisher) and incorporate them with my teachers, piece by piece, beginning this semester. The other two parts of the framework, transformational and transcendent, also have simple and descriptive elements. “T2: Transformational - T2.1: Production and T2.2: Contribution. T3: Transcendent - T3.1: Inquiry Design and T3.2 Social Entrepreneurship.” (Magana, 2017). Although his description of what transcendent technology entails is wonderful (basically problem-based learning without the Buck Institute buzzwords), the strength of his framework is in two different areas. First, one can easily picture the ladder-like continuum of educational technology integration, where one falls on that ladder and what the ultimate goals for students should be (active designers of their own learning journeys and creators of solutions to “wicked” problems). Though this kind of inquiry-based social entrepreneurship might be an idyllic goal, reflecting on and understanding where an educator stands in the midst of this framework is a powerful thing. The other element of Magana’s book which I think is notable is his emphasis in the T2: Transformational part of his framework on student reflection. In his discussion of student production, Magana delineates three elements: students produce personal mastery goals, track and visualize their growth and mastery, and produce and archive authentic knowledge and thought artifacts. (Magana, 2017) Nowhere have I seen student portfolios and reflections so seamlessly incorporated into a curriculum approach. I have personally tried, over the years, to squeeze student goal setting and reflection into a typical classroom schedule. In Magana’s framework, it is the middle part of the movement towards transcendent inquiry. This reflection initiates higher level thinking and creates the conditions necessary for life long learners. How can we get to a true transformation and redefinition of technology use until we practice with students the idea of reflecting on their own goals and learning? Will we ever push student thinking into higher levels without this step? Is it even possible to achieve lofty goals in education without first empowering students with a sense of their own education? Magana provides a specific example of a rubric and a spreadsheet, all in one, that teachers can use with their students. The weakness of this tool is its focus on the older student. A goal, perhaps, is to modify it for primary grades. In closing, Sonny Magana’s T3 Framework provides a simple, practical approach to seeing the big picture of technology integration in the classroom. His vision of the direction education should be moving in is clear, well-researched and consistent with his framework. Like so many of today’s leaders in education, the vocabulary and goals of Magana’s philosophy are consistent with the needs of the 21st Century learner. He is an important part of the movement towards helping educators catch up with the changing face of technology and the needs of today’s learners.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon White-Andrews

    Overall, I really enjoyed this book. First, it was easy to read and is made for the teacher in mind...aka the ideas are presented in an easy and straight forward way that allows for you to take them directly from the book to the classroom. This is sometime lacking when reading professional development books and can be very frustrating. What I thought was the most beneficial were all the tools in the throughout the book. The tools provided are ones for not only implementing the framework, but als Overall, I really enjoyed this book. First, it was easy to read and is made for the teacher in mind...aka the ideas are presented in an easy and straight forward way that allows for you to take them directly from the book to the classroom. This is sometime lacking when reading professional development books and can be very frustrating. What I thought was the most beneficial were all the tools in the throughout the book. The tools provided are ones for not only implementing the framework, but also setting goals around implementing technology within the classroom, and lastly observation tools to use within the classroom. I also liked that there was a big piece around reflection within each of the tools within the framework. As with anything we do in the teaching profession, it is important to reflect upon our practices and lessons and see what went well, and what we could do better the next time. With this text, there is also a piece where teachers reflect on what they want students to do with the technology and how they imagine that to look. This allows teachers to see their areas of need and what changes they need to make in order to make their ideas and lessons a reality within their classroom. In the end, I would recommend this book to any educator who is looking to not only implement technology within their classroom, but also looking for a tool to guide them in making that implementation the most effective and beneficial for their students and classroom.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    As a teacher educator, I have been interested in helping teachers integrate technology into their teaching for many years, and when I found TPACK and SAMR a few years ago, they made so much sense to me. I began teaching them to my pre-service teachers, but I began to realize that they were really just theory, that they had no real actionable attributes that teachers could comfortably implement without something more. Sonny Magana’s book is the “more.” The book offers a realistic framework to ide As a teacher educator, I have been interested in helping teachers integrate technology into their teaching for many years, and when I found TPACK and SAMR a few years ago, they made so much sense to me. I began teaching them to my pre-service teachers, but I began to realize that they were really just theory, that they had no real actionable attributes that teachers could comfortably implement without something more. Sonny Magana’s book is the “more.” The book offers a realistic framework to identify where I am in the process of tech integration with my students and outlines a way to move forward in measurable increments to reach the transcendent level that TPACK—and SAMR—point us to. I can only imagine what implementing this in a system schoolwide would look like and be able to achieve! This is really what the 21st Century should look like in schools.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stella Pollard

    I am an Instructional Technology Coordinator for our district. I spend a lot of time looking for resources to share with educators. I usually reference the SAMR model but not any more! This book brings forth the T3 Framework. T3 pushes the students a step further and gives teachers a more measurable approach at implementing technology. This book is filled with ready to use resources and ideas for any classroom that is using instructional technology.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Page

    Dr. Magana has created a easy to follow framework of how to integrate technology into classroom practice. Not only does he explain how technology can be implemented, but he also thoroughly incorporates teaching best practice. This book is a must read if you're interested in seamlessly incorporating technology in a meaningful authentic way. With the concepts and structure of the T3 framework any teacher of any level of competence can be successful with integration. Dr. Magana has created a easy to follow framework of how to integrate technology into classroom practice. Not only does he explain how technology can be implemented, but he also thoroughly incorporates teaching best practice. This book is a must read if you're interested in seamlessly incorporating technology in a meaningful authentic way. With the concepts and structure of the T3 framework any teacher of any level of competence can be successful with integration.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sadie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As Magana illustrates, disruptive innovation is often associated with something negative due to the change it invokes. Educators tend to get too comfortable in their practices and, thus, “the more reluctant they will be to disrupt or relinquish them” (Magana, 2017, Chapter 1, para. 5 ). Magana starts our journey through his technology framework by expressing the need to break the cycle of reluctancy and understand that access to technology does not equate to disruptive innovation. I cannot expec As Magana illustrates, disruptive innovation is often associated with something negative due to the change it invokes. Educators tend to get too comfortable in their practices and, thus, “the more reluctant they will be to disrupt or relinquish them” (Magana, 2017, Chapter 1, para. 5 ). Magana starts our journey through his technology framework by expressing the need to break the cycle of reluctancy and understand that access to technology does not equate to disruptive innovation. I cannot expect students to take a new technology tool and immediately know how to use it correctly without establishing clear expectations and goals with students first. Technology is not meant to replace teachers or supplement our instruction; instead, it enhances our strategies. As Magana shares what Eddie Van Halen once told him: You may be perfectly happy playing the same songs around the campfire, but if you want to get better, you realize that you are at a certain stage and that pathways exist for you to experience other stages of proficiency. (Chapter 6, para. 1) As Magana lays out the different tiers of technology use within his T3 Framework, he captivates the audience with many personal anecdotes, like that of the previously mentioned Eddie Van Halen, who’s musical talents were transcendent of all other guitarists of his time. Magana provides a separate chapter for each of the three stages of technology use: Translational, Transformational, and Transcendent. Within each stage, there are two steps in which educators can utilize technology in the classroom. Translational involves “doing old tasks in new ways” through Automation and Consumption tools. Transformational takes students’ work to another level by “doing new things in new ways” through Production and Contribution. Lastly, Transcendent supersedes them all by having students “[creating] new learning environments and [designing] new learning tools” with Inquiry Design and Social Entrepreneurship. Reaching the transcendent tier of Magana’s framework is something I have yet to achieve in my classroom. After reading about each stage of the T3 Framework, I realize I am not using technology to its fullest capabilities. I am comfortable with substituting a textbook or paper handout with a PDF version in Google Classroom. I provide video tutorials and integrate questions within the video using technology software. However, those practices are barely skimming the surface of what I can be providing for my students. While discussing the T3 Framework, Magana includes guided questions for the reader to consider the effect their technology use has in the classroom. After taking the reader through a personal reflection on teaching practices, Magana composes tables of educational tasks, commonly used tools, applicable users, and the value of each tool that educators and students use when implementing technology. If you were unsure of where you landed on the spectrum of technology use with your students, the T3 Framework establishes the exact stage you currently practice and provides strategies on how to advance your classroom even further. There are existing frameworks centered around technology within the classroom, such as Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition (SAMR) models. These frameworks explain the conceptual aspect of what technology looks like in the classroom. However, they do not frame how teachers can implement technology goals and assess their process reflectively. By providing guided questions, examples of technology tools, and thorough explanations of how educators and students can advance their use of technology, Magana’s framework stands high above the others. Throughout the entire book, the established themes of anecdotes, real-life applications, and interaction between the author and the audience’s personal growth maintained my attention. I anticipated the final chapter of applying the framework to be just as captivating as the others with the supporting materials presented within each level of the T3 Framework. I awaited another applicable story from Magana’s own experience with students, which he shared throughout the book. However, the last chapter was a series of rubrics presented in a repetitive form for the six steps in the T3 Framework. I would have preferred one explanation to go with a list of rubrics, compared to reading the same explanation six times for a slightly altered rubric.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This book has some great ideas, but was largely unreadable. I couldn’t get past the author routinely citing his own works and promoting all of the great things his students have done. Apparently his kids helped end the Cold War and helped with a North Pole expedition vis the nascent internet. His love of Eddie Van Halen was a little much since very few guitarist made actually imitate his style today. According to Magana, he’s the reason we have Rock music. I had a hard time imagining average stu This book has some great ideas, but was largely unreadable. I couldn’t get past the author routinely citing his own works and promoting all of the great things his students have done. Apparently his kids helped end the Cold War and helped with a North Pole expedition vis the nascent internet. His love of Eddie Van Halen was a little much since very few guitarist made actually imitate his style today. According to Magana, he’s the reason we have Rock music. I had a hard time imagining average students who don’t want to be in the classroom using T3 strategies. This seemed like it was aimed for the top end kids like my AP Research students. Read the summaries only and get the gist of the book instead of the whole thing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alida Hanson

    Am I giving this three stars because I don’t like what he says? I liked it until he argued that the best way to use technology in a transformative way is as a tool for planning and tracking learning, like a digital portfolio. And then his highest level was using technology in a transcendent way using the internet to communicate with others and solve problems. He bases this on the premise that most of the tech use in school is simply substitution. That was mind blowing for me!!! The bits about Edd Am I giving this three stars because I don’t like what he says? I liked it until he argued that the best way to use technology in a transformative way is as a tool for planning and tracking learning, like a digital portfolio. And then his highest level was using technology in a transcendent way using the internet to communicate with others and solve problems. He bases this on the premise that most of the tech use in school is simply substitution. That was mind blowing for me!!! The bits about Eddie Van Halen were cute and funny. I never paid much attention to him before and certainly never knew he was considered a guitar genius.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Bishop

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meagan Kelly

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tim Bianchi

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nkhosla

  16. 4 out of 5

    E.K. Koo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mowery

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melayna

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jody Bowie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Britney Padilla

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Bradford

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Calles

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Sypherd

  24. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  25. 5 out of 5

    Becca Purda Grajzl

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hyams

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bradly

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kotchakorn Kh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Caine

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