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Sapiens and Homo Deus: The E-book Collection: A Brief History of Humankind and A Brief History of Tomorrow

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Discover humanity’s past and its future in this in this special e-book collection featuring Sapiens—a reading pick of President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg—and its acclaimed companion Homo Deus.


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Discover humanity’s past and its future in this in this special e-book collection featuring Sapiens—a reading pick of President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg—and its acclaimed companion Homo Deus.

30 review for Sapiens and Homo Deus: The E-book Collection: A Brief History of Humankind and A Brief History of Tomorrow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frank Fong

    This is a book that is both entertaining and thought provoking. As the title suggests, it tells of a brief history of mankind divided into three segments: cognitive revolution, agricultural revolution and technological revolution. In a way this book very much reminds me of "Justice" by Michael Sandel, in the sense that it questions my own interpretation of human civilisation. Is it justifiable that men were traditionally more superior than women? Did people become domesticated by wheat, rice & p This is a book that is both entertaining and thought provoking. As the title suggests, it tells of a brief history of mankind divided into three segments: cognitive revolution, agricultural revolution and technological revolution. In a way this book very much reminds me of "Justice" by Michael Sandel, in the sense that it questions my own interpretation of human civilisation. Is it justifiable that men were traditionally more superior than women? Did people become domesticated by wheat, rice & potatoes in the transition into agricultural society or was it an improvement? Do modern day technologies empower people or do they enslave people? Unlike other books on human history, this book offers a new perspective into our progress as human civilisation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edmundo Varela

    Should be required reading for all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    A thought provoking history of humankind I spent my summer reading the first book, Homo Deus and found it one of the most interesting nonfiction books I’ve ever read. I learned so much more about our ancestors and appreciate their sophistication and realizing that progress is a mixed bag, both positive and negative.. The second volume, Homo Deus, took longer; partially because I had less time to read for pleasure and because it painted a disturbing picture of where we are heading as a species. I h A thought provoking history of humankind I spent my summer reading the first book, Homo Deus and found it one of the most interesting nonfiction books I’ve ever read. I learned so much more about our ancestors and appreciate their sophistication and realizing that progress is a mixed bag, both positive and negative.. The second volume, Homo Deus, took longer; partially because I had less time to read for pleasure and because it painted a disturbing picture of where we are heading as a species. I highly recommend you read both. They will give you ideas that will be difficult to leave behind.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nigesh Shakya

    The concept of Imagined Reality was groundbreaking.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Maria Nahlik

    A book that delights every person who knows how algorithms and computers work. It makes them feel less alone with their own realisation of the systemic human - machine and DNA- algorithm convergence (a realisation that one better keeps, still, for oneself, since 80% of us humans believe in a form of other of creationism or spiritual entities that govern life). This book follows a rigurous logic, is well documented, is up to date with the newest scientific discoveries and is written in a concise A book that delights every person who knows how algorithms and computers work. It makes them feel less alone with their own realisation of the systemic human - machine and DNA- algorithm convergence (a realisation that one better keeps, still, for oneself, since 80% of us humans believe in a form of other of creationism or spiritual entities that govern life). This book follows a rigurous logic, is well documented, is up to date with the newest scientific discoveries and is written in a concise and precise, though enjoyably colorful style.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amorn Thepbunchonchai

    Must read This book open my mind wider. They let me think back what we are doing today. What should we play attention? What will be faced next if we do the same thing?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo Townson

    Fascinating. Highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ash Todd

    An interesting lesson in understanding how humankind evolved and where we could end up. The concept of a superhuman is no science fiction but fact... Are Cyborgs going to replace humankind? If so, why is that such a bad idea?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Moore

    An excellent book. Highly recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Van Robarts

    Very interesting book. Structures his history around 3 revolutions: cognitive, agricultural, and scientific revolutions. Runs across a large number of topics along the way like religion, economics, politics and how he sees them interacting. Some discussions are very negative, but others are much more positive. His conclusion may seem fanciful in what he thinks is yet to come. Still is quite ruthless about how earlier periods had negatives just as the present day does. He also is quite frank abou Very interesting book. Structures his history around 3 revolutions: cognitive, agricultural, and scientific revolutions. Runs across a large number of topics along the way like religion, economics, politics and how he sees them interacting. Some discussions are very negative, but others are much more positive. His conclusion may seem fanciful in what he thinks is yet to come. Still is quite ruthless about how earlier periods had negatives just as the present day does. He also is quite frank about positives in both earlier periods and the present. The book starts a little slow (others who have read it tell me they had the same experience), but it is worth pushing through. I found the latter parts of the book fascinating. Some of his understandings will undoubtedly irritate, but they will make you think.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Umanga

    Having loved the earlier book 'The Sapiens", this book was a mild disappointment. The first part of the book was a review of the first book, which was fine. The second part of the book just seems to fly off into heights of speculation, as if Yuval Harari was trying to sensationalize, not persuade or describe. Having loved the earlier book 'The Sapiens", this book was a mild disappointment. The first part of the book was a review of the first book, which was fine. The second part of the book just seems to fly off into heights of speculation, as if Yuval Harari was trying to sensationalize, not persuade or describe.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anjana Ajayan

    Yuval noah has become my favourite author after I read this series of books The greatest highlight of the book is that the author stands out of the human perspective and judges us unbiased. I find the sarcastic yet interesting. It leaves you with new clearer and stronger perspective to look into human acts and behavior. To an extent it shows us why we are the way we are

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Chen

    The book has a very interesting premise, and it is well documented with many examples. I love how it reads like a store rather than pure facts and information. It definitely is a lighter read than many other history books.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    One of the most amazing and mesmerizing books that I read in my life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amar

    Marvelous Book !!! Thought Provoking ... one of the Best books after 1984 and Animal farm

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yaswanth Narvaneni

    One can get away reading the second book. Half of second book is repetition of first.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Garik

    The best book I read so far. Fall in love with anthropology.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ramandeep Singh

    Absolute gold. The breadth of topics covered here is phenomenal, from history to philosophy to probable future of our own species, there are a gamut of facts covered here. Must read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Badam Enkhbold

    Opened my eyes to see past and future. Im imressed with this author, Yuval noah harari , since he wrote important topics from all possible angles. <3

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kuzey

    If you want to knowledge about small story of sapiens this book is very good idea.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gitte Herdin

    When I wasn´t laughing, I was enjoying mysef. Or nodding in acknowledgement. Agreeing. Or reflecting. I was actually forced to reflect so much, my smiles rose from new learnings.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cyril

    Books bu my favourite historian and deep thinker with a long time line of human story and possible future.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Sever

    Probably the most interesting book(s) I've read Probably the most interesting book(s) I've read

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nan Moring

    Interesting book, but I did not agree with all of the authors hypothesis's. I think the big question remains...why are we so different from the rest of the animals the inhabit the earth? Interesting book, but I did not agree with all of the authors hypothesis's. I think the big question remains...why are we so different from the rest of the animals the inhabit the earth?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Noora

    It wasn't that good... It wasn't that good...

  26. 4 out of 5

    William Bryant

    Mind opening. Surprisingly changed a lot of my political and philosophical beliefs... and I'm a stubborn person. Mind opening. Surprisingly changed a lot of my political and philosophical beliefs... and I'm a stubborn person.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JoEllen

    Excellent! Should be required reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nuno

    "Homo Deus" is a bit too speculative and too long, but 'Sapiens" is just perfect. "Homo Deus" is a bit too speculative and too long, but 'Sapiens" is just perfect.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kalin Georgiev

    Truly liked "A Brief History of Humankind", but "Home Deus" was a disappointment. Truly liked "A Brief History of Humankind", but "Home Deus" was a disappointment.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peter Verboven

    I have been in doubt about the score for this book for a long time. The beginning of Sapiens is absolutely worth of four stars. Harari brings a level of insight and reflection to (pre-)history that I have not seen before. He structures the entire evolution of our species - from a lowly animal roaming the plains of East Africa to the complete dominance of the planet - around three fundamental revolutions. Two of them - the cognitive and the agricultural revolution - took place 70.000 and 10.000 y I have been in doubt about the score for this book for a long time. The beginning of Sapiens is absolutely worth of four stars. Harari brings a level of insight and reflection to (pre-)history that I have not seen before. He structures the entire evolution of our species - from a lowly animal roaming the plains of East Africa to the complete dominance of the planet - around three fundamental revolutions. Two of them - the cognitive and the agricultural revolution - took place 70.000 and 10.000 years ago; long before our times began. They turned us first into bands of hunter-gatherers that depend on cooperation for their survival; and then into settled beings that manipulate their direct environment to their profit. The third one, the scientific revolution, started only a few centuries ago and is quickly transforming our world into one that we may soon not recognize anymore. The first half of the book is enlightening, as it ties major developments to the evolving mental and social abilities of Sapiens as a species. It is thought provoking and challenges many of the common assumptions about the uniqueness of man and its place in the grand scheme of things. After that it is downhill. At times I felt I was reading a different book; still eloquently written, but far more superficial and ideological. Nice-to-know chapters about all kinds of topics take up the last 150 pages and make it less motivating to continue. They dwell on things like the Dutch and British empires, clocks and timetables, the meaning of money, happiness and genetic engineering. The final chapters are the worst - they are superficial, too fluffy and even a bit tiresome. That definitely tilted the scale towards three stars. Although this volume also contains the follow-up book "Homo deus" I feel no urge whatsoever to read it and will gladly skip it for another read.

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