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Frederick Douglass: A Life From Beginning to End

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Frederick Douglass * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Slavery is a dark spot in the history of the United States, a time when the rights of African-Americans were non-existent. Slaves were beaten, mutilated, raped, and killed with impunity. Their lives were a livin Frederick Douglass * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Slavery is a dark spot in the history of the United States, a time when the rights of African-Americans were non-existent. Slaves were beaten, mutilated, raped, and killed with impunity. Their lives were a living hell from which death was the only escape they could dare to hope for. From this darkness, many heroes emerged, one of which was a man named Frederick Douglass. Born a slave in Maryland, Douglass believed he had found the key to the power of the white man—education. He taught himself to read and write, and then he proceeded to teach other slaves to read and write as well. Inside you will read about... ✓ On the Backs of Slaves: The Role of Slavery in the Economic Development of a New World ✓ Born into Slavery: Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey ✓ Escape to the North: Douglass’ escape and early life as a free man ✓ Equality and War: Douglass’ Work as a Free Man ✓ Suffrage and Service: Douglass’ Other Causes and Later Life And much more! As a slave, Frederick Douglass endured many cases of abuse and indignity while he waited to make his escape. On his third attempt, he finally succeeded, and once free, he proceeded to fight tirelessly throughout his life for the freedom and equality of all people. He was a true believer in the principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and codified in the United States Constitution. He became a celebrated orator, writer, and statesman, and he was always an abolitionist. His work in this regard helped abolish slavery in all of the United States, and he fought passionately for the equality of all people regardless of race or sex throughout the whole of his life. He is a true American hero. This book tells the compelling story of his life in succinct, yet informative detail that is both educational and entertaining.


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Frederick Douglass * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Slavery is a dark spot in the history of the United States, a time when the rights of African-Americans were non-existent. Slaves were beaten, mutilated, raped, and killed with impunity. Their lives were a livin Frederick Douglass * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. Slavery is a dark spot in the history of the United States, a time when the rights of African-Americans were non-existent. Slaves were beaten, mutilated, raped, and killed with impunity. Their lives were a living hell from which death was the only escape they could dare to hope for. From this darkness, many heroes emerged, one of which was a man named Frederick Douglass. Born a slave in Maryland, Douglass believed he had found the key to the power of the white man—education. He taught himself to read and write, and then he proceeded to teach other slaves to read and write as well. Inside you will read about... ✓ On the Backs of Slaves: The Role of Slavery in the Economic Development of a New World ✓ Born into Slavery: Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey ✓ Escape to the North: Douglass’ escape and early life as a free man ✓ Equality and War: Douglass’ Work as a Free Man ✓ Suffrage and Service: Douglass’ Other Causes and Later Life And much more! As a slave, Frederick Douglass endured many cases of abuse and indignity while he waited to make his escape. On his third attempt, he finally succeeded, and once free, he proceeded to fight tirelessly throughout his life for the freedom and equality of all people. He was a true believer in the principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and codified in the United States Constitution. He became a celebrated orator, writer, and statesman, and he was always an abolitionist. His work in this regard helped abolish slavery in all of the United States, and he fought passionately for the equality of all people regardless of race or sex throughout the whole of his life. He is a true American hero. This book tells the compelling story of his life in succinct, yet informative detail that is both educational and entertaining.

30 review for Frederick Douglass: A Life From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    “Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.” Frederick Douglass Slavery was a festering sore on the North American colonies from almost their conception. As time passed, the colonies prospered, and eventually united against a common enemy, the slavery sore, though covered over, has turned into a cancer that w “Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.” Frederick Douglass Slavery was a festering sore on the North American colonies from almost their conception. As time passed, the colonies prospered, and eventually united against a common enemy, the slavery sore, though covered over, has turned into a cancer that will continue to grow as time passes. Today I find it inconceivable that the nation’s founding fathers could conceive and create a beacon of freedom while holding humans in perpetual servitude. Major composer and author of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson writes: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Aside from the suspect grammar and punctuation, this remains a moving and inspiring statement that can still send chills up your spine; yet Jefferson, like many of the founding fathers, held people against their will, depriving them of the very rights they declare to be self-evident. Frederick Douglass aka Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born into slavery in Talbot County, Maryland in1818. He escaped slavery in 1838 and moved north. He was active in the antislavery movement and, with his eloquent speaking ability, was a popular speaker. He later traveled to England and Ireland, winning support for the abolitionist’s cause. Douglas married Anna Murray, a freed slave, in 1838. He continued to fight for equal rights for both Negros and women for the rest of his life, impacting the nation but not succeeding to achieve his ultimate goal of complete equality. I found this narrative inspiring and interesting but found myself being bogged down in an originalism/textualism quagmire. Ultimately the waters are cleared and the life, trials, and times of a remarkably strong man are exposed as a shining lesson to all. Acknowledging the fact that the United States was a “melting pot” of nationalities, religions, cultures, and colors, Douglass was an advocate of migration and immigration. The thought brought a smile to my face when I think of President Trumps “Mexican Wall”, “Immigration Ban”, and “America First” campaign rhetoric. The hunger and thirst for knowledge are a constant for most people. What makes the world and its diversity in peoples and cultures what it is today? Reading this abbreviated tome is sure to inspire many to delve deeper into this remarkable life of struggle and hope.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anirudh

    This is a short biography by Hourly History of the American Civil Rights activist during the late 19th Century, Frederick Douglass. The book starts with the practice of slavery in the United States, followed by the early life of Frederick Douglass and his eventual escape from slavery, becoming a well-known orator and writer and eventually, an activist for abolition of slavery and equal voting rights for African Americans and women. The book started well, giving a background into the practice of This is a short biography by Hourly History of the American Civil Rights activist during the late 19th Century, Frederick Douglass. The book starts with the practice of slavery in the United States, followed by the early life of Frederick Douglass and his eventual escape from slavery, becoming a well-known orator and writer and eventually, an activist for abolition of slavery and equal voting rights for African Americans and women. The book started well, giving a background into the practice of slavery, the punishment for escaping and the risks involved and the eventual escape by Douglass. The book also elaborated well on his activism and his quest for acquiring knowledge and also, had a touch upon his personal life. To be fair, I have heard of activists such as Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman or Martin Luther King Jr. but I had never heard of Frederick Douglass and considering that position, I felt that the book gave me a good insight into the personality as well as the history of slavery in the United States. I felt that the book overrated his bid for the office of the Vice-President of the United States, considering, he didn’t run for any major party and attained negligible votes. Even if the book had to mention that, they also should have given the information that he ran along with an independent and didn’t secure significant votes. I enjoyed reading the book, I feel Douglass is not a personality touched upon by many of the books on Civil Rights movement, unlike the others I have already mentioned and I am glad that I read the book. I would award the book a rating of four on five.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Angela Kalnins

    Frederick Douglass: A Life from Beginning to End By: Hourly History I am a lover of history. Yet, I am not married to history. I do not know it well. However, Frederick Douglass has always been, to me, a fascinating figure from the past. The book is brief, but well written. It touches on the most important moments of Douglass’s life—his birth, his bondage, his escape to the North. It speaks of his most famous orations and his successes. It briefly delves into his personal life and the last moments Frederick Douglass: A Life from Beginning to End By: Hourly History I am a lover of history. Yet, I am not married to history. I do not know it well. However, Frederick Douglass has always been, to me, a fascinating figure from the past. The book is brief, but well written. It touches on the most important moments of Douglass’s life—his birth, his bondage, his escape to the North. It speaks of his most famous orations and his successes. It briefly delves into his personal life and the last moments of his time on earth. Frederick Douglass: A Life from Beginning to End by Hourly History is a but a scratch on the surface of this man’s life story. And that’s exactly what it intends to be—an appetizer. One reviewer wrote, “I will say this book has sparked an interest for me to read Frederick Douglass' autobiography and it also taught me some things I did not know.” (PATOLA Oct 2, 2017 Amazon Reviewer) Consider then A Life from Beginning to End to be a success. If you are looking for an in-depth moment-by-moment accounting of the life of Frederick Douglass, you will not find it here. However, if you are looking for something light to digest with a small glass of wine, something to give your evening a little flavor, you have settled on the perfect “snack”. My only complaint with this endeavor is: to a small degree the author followed advice given to ME in my junior year of High School by a thesis writing instructor: “tell them what you’re going to tell them. Tell them. Tell them what you told you them.” The book is somewhat repetitive. However, at the risk of repeating myself… Try it. You’ll like it. And you’ll learn something too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    Great history lesson for equality I really enjoyed this history lesson, I hope to go further into his life by reading his autobiographies! It is so inspiring to see one human’s tireless efforts to fight for decency of humanity. We all need to hear these lessons in present day circumstances.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ed Barton

    One of the Greats Now often glossed over in history classes, the abolitionist movement and Frederick Douglass are worthy of study and consideration. This quick to read book gives a basic overview of the life of Frederick Douglass and perspectives on his life and work. A good read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    michael king

    Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey After reading this it seemed like I read an entire 300 page book on the life of Frederick Douglas. I've always wanted to know more about him and I'm glad I took the time with this book. I'm more inclined to dig a little more deeper thanks to Hourly History. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey After reading this it seemed like I read an entire 300 page book on the life of Frederick Douglas. I've always wanted to know more about him and I'm glad I took the time with this book. I'm more inclined to dig a little more deeper thanks to Hourly History.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pat Wilson

    Worth the read. I am sure there are much better writings from Douglas but this was free on Audible. Written i think soon after his escape, it is interesting how careful he is not to reveal information the slaves could use.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Star Gater

    Never gave up, hero? This was as graphic as I want to go. I cannot imagine reading his 3 books. I'm amazed that with all that he witnessed, he was able to continue fighting for all people. Never gave up, hero? This was as graphic as I want to go. I cannot imagine reading his 3 books. I'm amazed that with all that he witnessed, he was able to continue fighting for all people.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Lygrisse

    Disconnected narrative The author leaves the reader with a frustration of trying to weave together the events mentioned in scattered format. Has some interesting points, redundant at times.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Parker

    Advocate that education is the true liberater Born into slavery, he taught himself to read and write, and from those humble beginnings, he rose to become one of the greatest orators and writers in American history.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    A True American This man is a National Hero he fought for every group who had no rights I wish he'd been President A True American This man is a National Hero he fought for every group who had no rights I wish he'd been President

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    On more horrid record of America's darkest period. On more horrid record of America's darkest period.

  13. 5 out of 5

    George Polansky

    An introduction to the life of Frederick Douglass. An interesting read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    A great man and American legend. The content was overly repetitious, but it contained a decent sketch of his life and accomplishments.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    WOW!!! Knew nothing about him. Was never taught about him in school so this was a massive eye opener. Truly awe-inspiring individual

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zack

    I recently read this book for class and was left truly unsatisfied. I believe that Frederick Douglass is way more exciting than this book lets on. I think that this is a book that is necessary but would definitely wait till the college or graduate level to introduce it. Its length is deceptive because although it is short the depth and weight of his work is very serious and needs to be handled as such. I also think that if it is introduced to early it could potentially be a turn off for kids goi I recently read this book for class and was left truly unsatisfied. I believe that Frederick Douglass is way more exciting than this book lets on. I think that this is a book that is necessary but would definitely wait till the college or graduate level to introduce it. Its length is deceptive because although it is short the depth and weight of his work is very serious and needs to be handled as such. I also think that if it is introduced to early it could potentially be a turn off for kids going into history.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julian Orozco, Jr.

    Frederick Douglass Never Giving Up This is a good book for quick information. Would and could have better if author did not repeat some information or history, two or three times in the entire book. There would have been more space for more information on Frederick Douglass.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  19. 5 out of 5

    Darren

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brett

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Wood

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amber Cartwright

  23. 5 out of 5

    Laurent Legouté

  24. 4 out of 5

    Juan Alfredo Hermann

  25. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Mailund

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  27. 4 out of 5

    louis edwards

  28. 5 out of 5

    Billy Mc Neill

  29. 5 out of 5

    John English

  30. 5 out of 5

    lori rowe cottingham

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