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Walter Was Worried (Ala Notable Children's Books. Younger Readers (Awards))

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Opposite the simple declarative sentence, "Walter was worried" is a portrait of a very worried Walter. But wait! The letters that spell out his feelings form his facial characteristics, as well as his expression. Gradually a simple story unfolds: the sky grows dark, the fog rolls in, lightning lights the sky, and thunder shakes the trees; Priscilla was puzzled, Shirley was Opposite the simple declarative sentence, "Walter was worried" is a portrait of a very worried Walter. But wait! The letters that spell out his feelings form his facial characteristics, as well as his expression. Gradually a simple story unfolds: the sky grows dark, the fog rolls in, lightning lights the sky, and thunder shakes the trees; Priscilla was puzzled, Shirley was shocked, Frederick was frightened... and eventually (when the sun came out) Henry was hopeful, and Elliot ecstatic.


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Opposite the simple declarative sentence, "Walter was worried" is a portrait of a very worried Walter. But wait! The letters that spell out his feelings form his facial characteristics, as well as his expression. Gradually a simple story unfolds: the sky grows dark, the fog rolls in, lightning lights the sky, and thunder shakes the trees; Priscilla was puzzled, Shirley was Opposite the simple declarative sentence, "Walter was worried" is a portrait of a very worried Walter. But wait! The letters that spell out his feelings form his facial characteristics, as well as his expression. Gradually a simple story unfolds: the sky grows dark, the fog rolls in, lightning lights the sky, and thunder shakes the trees; Priscilla was puzzled, Shirley was shocked, Frederick was frightened... and eventually (when the sun came out) Henry was hopeful, and Elliot ecstatic.

30 review for Walter Was Worried (Ala Notable Children's Books. Younger Readers (Awards))

  1. 5 out of 5

    Johannah

    Amazing to teach vocabulary abbot feelings of fear. Great to have kids search for letters in the illustrations. Quick read but lots to use for lessons!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adora Fahrenbruch

    The storm is coming! Walter Was Worried is the perfect early reader! The story has minimal text and allows any child to determine the meaning of the story. The illustrations show characters go through a series of emotions based on the different layers of the storm. This book is written from the inside looking out at the storm developing and eventually passing. The text is found both within the illustrations and also in the blank spaces. For example, the text is found in the blank space stating t The storm is coming! Walter Was Worried is the perfect early reader! The story has minimal text and allows any child to determine the meaning of the story. The illustrations show characters go through a series of emotions based on the different layers of the storm. This book is written from the inside looking out at the storm developing and eventually passing. The text is found both within the illustrations and also in the blank spaces. For example, the text is found in the blank space stating the feeling and the feeling is spelled out within the characters emotion. The literary elements of the story are developed parallel as the pictures and text both tell the same story. Overall, I would recommend this book to any early reader to introduce feelings and weather.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kyoungbin Min

    1. No awards 2. 4-8 years 3. This book expresses different types of feelings with faces that describe the feeling. The faces are designed with letters of each feeling. 4. I find the author really clever and creative to come up with such idea; the children can both learn about the feeling and alphabets better than with other books. 5. Individual reading, shared reading, writing workshop

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I understand what it's getting at but those faces are weird AF! I understand what it's getting at but those faces are weird AF!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Raelicia Morris

    "Walter Was Worried" is a book about emotions we experience on a daily basis. The illustrations and text both tell the same story with minimal words within the topic of various weathers. The story begins with a sequential order of a storm and characters that have negative feelings about what they are seeing in the sky. However, the book takes the turn for the better when the characters begin to feel positive emotions because their environment around them positively change. Emotions can change qu "Walter Was Worried" is a book about emotions we experience on a daily basis. The illustrations and text both tell the same story with minimal words within the topic of various weathers. The story begins with a sequential order of a storm and characters that have negative feelings about what they are seeing in the sky. However, the book takes the turn for the better when the characters begin to feel positive emotions because their environment around them positively change. Emotions can change quickly if the situation changes. I really liked board games, really all games growing up and "Walter Was Worried" made me feel like I was playing a game at the same time I was reading. When I was looking for the letters that made up the emotions on the character's face, it was really amusing to me especially because I do not like to read for leisure. I would recommend this book for children who have a difficult time expressing themselves because it is really important to pair an emotion with a real-life experience, so that even if a child does not know how they are feeling but they can place meaning and understanding to the circumstance, it would help a lot especially by recalling this book. Also, the book reassures that people's feelings are real and affected by their environment. Overall, the book was fun and interesting to read because the author made a color-coded puzzle with the emotions and the corresponding character's face, that could be made into an "Eye Spy" game identifying different letters during the reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Lambourn

    This is not really a story, but a series of emotions each with accompanying poetic and visual reasons for why each child is feeling a certain emotion. If it is taken for what it is without a desire for story, I might give it a 5. Or if only seeking story, I might give it a 3. What it does it does brilliantly and simply - often what appears simple is difficult to conceptualize, and so it is quite original. The art is painterly - clearly displaying a knowledge of color, design, art. Yet Seeger has This is not really a story, but a series of emotions each with accompanying poetic and visual reasons for why each child is feeling a certain emotion. If it is taken for what it is without a desire for story, I might give it a 5. Or if only seeking story, I might give it a 3. What it does it does brilliantly and simply - often what appears simple is difficult to conceptualize, and so it is quite original. The art is painterly - clearly displaying a knowledge of color, design, art. Yet Seeger has managed to create art with a feeling that a child might have done. She adds in a fun and sophisticated element of setting the type of each emotion word in very specific letters, that the reader can then find moved around onto the picture as the actual facial elements showing the emotion. Obviously, that means many are turned around, so a little effort is needed to find the word. She adds in alliteration with a different letter to describe each child and emotion - but the reasons are like poetic phrases, with dramatic dynamic illustrations.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauri

    Alliterative text makes this a simple, repetitive read aloud. the pictures and vocabulary also make it a great tool to talk about feelings and emotions. Would be a great mentor text for teaching alliteration or creating a class book of students' feelings. Alliterative text makes this a simple, repetitive read aloud. the pictures and vocabulary also make it a great tool to talk about feelings and emotions. Would be a great mentor text for teaching alliteration or creating a class book of students' feelings.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shaquira DesDune

    This is a cute book. Great book to introduce alliteration to young children. Each child has a different emotion and the emotion sounds like their name. This book can also teach children about their emotions as it uses descriptive words to express the feelings of each child.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    Weird letter faces without much story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    Makes for a great art activity with 2nd graders- hide your name in your self portrait

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I enjoyed this concept book especially because all of the letters from the word used to describe each person are used to create the face of the character. It would be fun to read this book one page at a time and have the students point out the letters used to make the facial expressions of the person, but also to open up a discussion of times they might have felt those same emotions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The image of a boy’s worried face staring out from the cover of this book is curiously intriguing upon first glance. With no title on the cover, one is immediately drawn to open this book and discover more about this perplexing little boy. Soon one learns that this boy is none other than Walter, a boy who is worried. However, upon closer inspection, one finds that Walter is also a boy who is visually defined by his worried state. Along with the other characters introduced in this story, Walter’s The image of a boy’s worried face staring out from the cover of this book is curiously intriguing upon first glance. With no title on the cover, one is immediately drawn to open this book and discover more about this perplexing little boy. Soon one learns that this boy is none other than Walter, a boy who is worried. However, upon closer inspection, one finds that Walter is also a boy who is visually defined by his worried state. Along with the other characters introduced in this story, Walter’s facial expression is masterfully depicted using the physical letters needed to spell his emotional state. Readers will enjoy locating each letter and how it will be used with others to create a unique expression. While the letter D may be one character’s mouth, the letter U may be another’s nose. Additionally, the stylistic depictions of the letters in the text are replicated exactly in each accompanying illustration. Using the technique of alliteration, the author also textually connects each character to his or her special emotion: “Shirley was shocked,” while “Delilah was delighted.” The reason behind each character’s emotion is not revealed until one turns the page, constantly enticing the reader to move forward and discover how the story will conclude. With a clear, consistent design and steady pace, this book truly provides an engaging experience pleasing to the eye and the ear. Additionally, this book is a great resource to introduce alliteration and descriptive language to young learners.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Seeger, Laura Vaccaro. Walter was Worried. Roaring Book Press, 2005. 34Pages. Concept Picture Book Summary – Uh, oh! Here comes a storm! As they experience every emotion during the phases of a tempest, the feelings are written all over the children’s faces – literally! Area for Critique – Creativity behind the book. (B) I expected the pictures to depict the emotions that were stated in the story; however, I didn’t expect to see the letters of the feelings spelled out on the children’s faces. (C) Fro Seeger, Laura Vaccaro. Walter was Worried. Roaring Book Press, 2005. 34Pages. Concept Picture Book Summary – Uh, oh! Here comes a storm! As they experience every emotion during the phases of a tempest, the feelings are written all over the children’s faces – literally! Area for Critique – Creativity behind the book. (B) I expected the pictures to depict the emotions that were stated in the story; however, I didn’t expect to see the letters of the feelings spelled out on the children’s faces. (C) From the beginning of the book when “Walter was worried when the sky grew dark” -the “R”’s make the furrowed eyebrows; the “D” makes the concerned mouth; and the “o” and “a” make the opened aghast eyes- to the end of the book when Elliot was ecstatic when the sun came out and his excitement of glee on the “a” of the mouth, all emotions were spelled out in the kid’s expressions. (D). Curriculum Connection - This would be great as an introduction to concrete poetry. After reading the book, students could try their hand at creating shape poetry. Perhaps boys could make a poem in the shape of a football after a midget league game, or girls could make shapes in flowers or butterflies. This could also be used as an example of emotions before a lesson on pantomimes in drama class. Each student could demonstrate emotion only through facial expressions and not in words.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Walter Was Worried is a fantastic book for children to read when they are learning about different emotions a person can have. The book tells us about eight children who have different emotions about a scary storm. Each child has a different emotion to go with the sequence of the storm. The book starts out with Walter being worried about the sky growing dark, but by the end Elliot was ecstatic when the sun came out. This book is helpful when teaching children about the weather cycle. It is impor Walter Was Worried is a fantastic book for children to read when they are learning about different emotions a person can have. The book tells us about eight children who have different emotions about a scary storm. Each child has a different emotion to go with the sequence of the storm. The book starts out with Walter being worried about the sky growing dark, but by the end Elliot was ecstatic when the sun came out. This book is helpful when teaching children about the weather cycle. It is important for them to know that the rain will stop eventually and there is no reason to be scared or upset. The face illustrations that go with the action words are amazing. Putting the action words and illustrations together makes the comprehension easier for the students. Also, I thought it was extremely cool whenever the alphabet letters were used to make the child's facial features. I think this book could be used for several different lessons such as emotions, weather, colors, or the alphabet. I thought the drawings used vibrant colors that will help keep the child's attention.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mercedes Enciso

    Seeger, L. (2005). Walter Was Worried. New Milford, Connecticut: Roaring Brook Press. This book is about how different children react to a storm. Walter, for example, was worried. What we also see is the word “worried” spelled on Walter’s face. As the storm progresses, different children are introduced into the story. For example, Shirley was “shocked”, and we also see the word “shocked” spelled on her face. The names of the children and the choices of adjectives are creatively combined in a way Seeger, L. (2005). Walter Was Worried. New Milford, Connecticut: Roaring Brook Press. This book is about how different children react to a storm. Walter, for example, was worried. What we also see is the word “worried” spelled on Walter’s face. As the storm progresses, different children are introduced into the story. For example, Shirley was “shocked”, and we also see the word “shocked” spelled on her face. The names of the children and the choices of adjectives are creatively combined in a way that they both are similar. “Walter” and “worried” both start with a “w”. “Shirley” and “shocked” both start with an “s”. This is a great book that takes creativity to another level, by hiding words in children’s expressions. It stretches children’s minds by having them find these words and also showing them the relationship between the names and adjectives. In the classroom, you can ask your students to write what their biggest fear is, and then have them draw their own facial expressions when they encounter their biggest fear.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Walter was Worried is a book about emotions. Throughout the pages, it shows the different emotions from the children. Each emotion is in relationship to what is happening with the weather. This book is children friendly and can be read by a child alone. It has very short sentences. The only thing that may be difficult for the children is the words that are being focused on, such as "puzzled." The illustrator did an amazing job with incorporating the spelling of the emotion in the face of each pers Walter was Worried is a book about emotions. Throughout the pages, it shows the different emotions from the children. Each emotion is in relationship to what is happening with the weather. This book is children friendly and can be read by a child alone. It has very short sentences. The only thing that may be difficult for the children is the words that are being focused on, such as "puzzled." The illustrator did an amazing job with incorporating the spelling of the emotion in the face of each person. Some letters were used for mouths, eyebrows, and the nose. With this technique, the text isn't needed for the readers to figure out what is happening. The only thing it may be needed for is the thunderstorm that is happening.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this concept book originally published a decade ago, the author/illustrator uses letters of the alphabet on the faces of her characters to spell out the feelings they are experiencing. Although it might sound rather odd, but it works quite well here as each of the youngsters--Walter, Priscilla, Shirley, Frederick, Ursula, Delilah, Henry, and Elliott--experiences some sort of emotion. Because the reason for the character's fears or delights is provided on the page after the character is introd In this concept book originally published a decade ago, the author/illustrator uses letters of the alphabet on the faces of her characters to spell out the feelings they are experiencing. Although it might sound rather odd, but it works quite well here as each of the youngsters--Walter, Priscilla, Shirley, Frederick, Ursula, Delilah, Henry, and Elliott--experiences some sort of emotion. Because the reason for the character's fears or delights is provided on the page after the character is introduced, young readers may feel reassured and relate to what they are feeling. I like the use of alliteration here, and how all of these feelings surround a storm. This is clever and effective stuff, and the bright colors used here make the book even more appealing for youngsters.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    A storm is approaching and each child reacts to it differently. “Walter was worried when the sky grew dark.” “Priscilla was puzzled when the fog rolled in.” But … “Delilah was delighted when the rain turned to snow.” Finally the sun comes back out allowing the children to get out and play. Seeger uses this concept book to convey a number of lessons, including recognition of expressions, letters, and descriptive words. On each spread the simple sentence starter is followed by the child’s face on t A storm is approaching and each child reacts to it differently. “Walter was worried when the sky grew dark.” “Priscilla was puzzled when the fog rolled in.” But … “Delilah was delighted when the rain turned to snow.” Finally the sun comes back out allowing the children to get out and play. Seeger uses this concept book to convey a number of lessons, including recognition of expressions, letters, and descriptive words. On each spread the simple sentence starter is followed by the child’s face on the opposing page. The child’s features and expression are created by the letters used to spell each emotion. Creative and unique, students will enjoy finding each letter, while anticipating what will happen next.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Bailey

    I love this book because of the art possibilities it has. The illustrations in the book consists of faces with the words described spelled in the faces. I can see this as an activity where students can draw a description of words (vocabulary) and write the words in the picture. The words are all in past tense, so this could introduce students to past tense words. Students will learn about past tense words being regular and irregular. This book provides many regular verbs that needs the -ed endin I love this book because of the art possibilities it has. The illustrations in the book consists of faces with the words described spelled in the faces. I can see this as an activity where students can draw a description of words (vocabulary) and write the words in the picture. The words are all in past tense, so this could introduce students to past tense words. Students will learn about past tense words being regular and irregular. This book provides many regular verbs that needs the -ed ending. Also students learn about various emotions and feeling and what brings them on. The students can connect to the book by writing what scares or socked them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book is awesome! Each page has a different emotion for each different kid which is pictured on the opposite page. Each face is then pictured and all the features are made out of the letters in the emotion word ie Walter on the cover has a D mouth, an o eye and an e eye, l nose, r eyebrows and a w and i worry line under each eye. It took me a second to figure out that's what was going on, but my alphabet loving son loved that and it was very interactive for the reason. I thought it would be This book is awesome! Each page has a different emotion for each different kid which is pictured on the opposite page. Each face is then pictured and all the features are made out of the letters in the emotion word ie Walter on the cover has a D mouth, an o eye and an e eye, l nose, r eyebrows and a w and i worry line under each eye. It took me a second to figure out that's what was going on, but my alphabet loving son loved that and it was very interactive for the reason. I thought it would be a good book for exploring emotions, but it was so much more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    I really liked this simple text that helps kids name strong emotions. The illustrations are fantastic - great paintings, close-up of kids' faces. Very fun graphics for the text. And I liked how it turned positive in the end. Here are some samples (they're split / so you have to turn the page to find out why) "Walter was worried when / the sky turned dark. Priscilla was puzzled when / the fog rolled in. Shirley was shocked when / the lightning lit the sky. ... Delilah was delighted when / the rain tur I really liked this simple text that helps kids name strong emotions. The illustrations are fantastic - great paintings, close-up of kids' faces. Very fun graphics for the text. And I liked how it turned positive in the end. Here are some samples (they're split / so you have to turn the page to find out why) "Walter was worried when / the sky turned dark. Priscilla was puzzled when / the fog rolled in. Shirley was shocked when / the lightning lit the sky. ... Delilah was delighted when / the rain turned to snow. Henry was hopeful when/ the sky began to clear."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Johnson

    This book has bright and vivid colors in it. I like how it has like one solid color on the page but the color changes for every page so it keeps it interesting. The font changes every time. Sometime it will be small lettering then it will get huge for what the picture is talking about. The best part of the whole book is whatever word it is talking about it spells out on the face of the character with its eyes, nose mouth and forehead. You would not know it says that until you look into detail of This book has bright and vivid colors in it. I like how it has like one solid color on the page but the color changes for every page so it keeps it interesting. The font changes every time. Sometime it will be small lettering then it will get huge for what the picture is talking about. The best part of the whole book is whatever word it is talking about it spells out on the face of the character with its eyes, nose mouth and forehead. You would not know it says that until you look into detail of the book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Cregor

    This is one of those books you have to SEE to believe! The illustrator took the letters from the adjectives/words to describe the characters of the book and made their features and expressions on their face, in order to match the characters' feelings. Quite ingenius. I mean, the illustrations are not masterpieces, but the idea is original and appealing to children, and adults like me. This book can be used to teach linking verbs and adjectives. In addition, the short story can teach children to This is one of those books you have to SEE to believe! The illustrator took the letters from the adjectives/words to describe the characters of the book and made their features and expressions on their face, in order to match the characters' feelings. Quite ingenius. I mean, the illustrations are not masterpieces, but the idea is original and appealing to children, and adults like me. This book can be used to teach linking verbs and adjectives. In addition, the short story can teach children to begin to identify the source and the emotions behind different feelings.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chrissie

    I think this book will work best when the child reads it with an adult. It can be used as a starting point for discussing their own emotions, what causes them, how we express them or how different people feel different emotions to a given experience. The book also can be be used with children of different ages which makes for a more lively reading experience. Small children can look for the kite and show how they feel. Older children can look after the letters hidden in the facial expresions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    The pictures in the book have hidden letters that spell out the emotion of the character. What a great way to talk to students about feelings. They are sure to be attentive in this book that requires active engagement to figure out! This book teaches letter recognition, spelling, and alliteration. The School Library Journal Review says "With only one sentence per page, there is surprising depth in this wonderful collaboration of art and story." The pictures in the book have hidden letters that spell out the emotion of the character. What a great way to talk to students about feelings. They are sure to be attentive in this book that requires active engagement to figure out! This book teaches letter recognition, spelling, and alliteration. The School Library Journal Review says "With only one sentence per page, there is surprising depth in this wonderful collaboration of art and story."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Simple text about some kids who have different feelings about the storm coming in. "Priscilla was puzzled when..' the opposite page shows the girls puzzled face and the letters PUZZLED are used to make up her face. A good book for sitting down one on one with a child to find all the letters. Might not work well with a large group. Could be used for feelings/emotions or letter recognition. Simple text about some kids who have different feelings about the storm coming in. "Priscilla was puzzled when..' the opposite page shows the girls puzzled face and the letters PUZZLED are used to make up her face. A good book for sitting down one on one with a child to find all the letters. Might not work well with a large group. Could be used for feelings/emotions or letter recognition.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I actually loved this one more than I thought it would. We like weather. We like expressive faces. We like hidden details to look for in pictures. Check, check, and check. (Bonus squiggly check for the fact my daughter was excited by the title because she has a crush on a boy named Walter who looks nothing like the boy in the book and is a foot shorter than her.)

  28. 5 out of 5

    June

    I always find Hanoch Piven's illustrations interesting and Seeger's faces illustrated with the letters of the emotion pictured reminds me of them. I might try this at a smaller story time of PJ time and see if the children can find the letters. 10/15/13 Used this at Story Time and it went over pretty well. I always find Hanoch Piven's illustrations interesting and Seeger's faces illustrated with the letters of the emotion pictured reminds me of them. I might try this at a smaller story time of PJ time and see if the children can find the letters. 10/15/13 Used this at Story Time and it went over pretty well.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Horton

    I really liked this book. There wasn't much to the text, however the illustrations made up for it. In each of the pages where one of the children showed an expression it showed that expression broken into its letters and used in the pictures, I thought that was neat, I also enjoyed looking for each of the letters. That alone draws the readers in. Good book! I really liked this book. There wasn't much to the text, however the illustrations made up for it. In each of the pages where one of the children showed an expression it showed that expression broken into its letters and used in the pictures, I thought that was neat, I also enjoyed looking for each of the letters. That alone draws the readers in. Good book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Children's faces, depicted with letters of the alphabet, react to the onset of a storm and its aftermath in this picture book, accompanied by simple alliterative text. Children's faces, with features depicted by letters of the alphabet, express a range of emotions in response to the onset of a storm and its aftermath. Accompanied by simple, alliterative text. Children's faces, depicted with letters of the alphabet, react to the onset of a storm and its aftermath in this picture book, accompanied by simple alliterative text. Children's faces, with features depicted by letters of the alphabet, express a range of emotions in response to the onset of a storm and its aftermath. Accompanied by simple, alliterative text.

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