Hot Best Seller

Great Masters: Mozart: His Life and Music

Availability: Ready to download

8 Audio CD's, 8 Lectures. 8 Audio CD's, 8 Lectures.


Compare

8 Audio CD's, 8 Lectures. 8 Audio CD's, 8 Lectures.

30 review for Great Masters: Mozart: His Life and Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marilee

    This was my first Great Course recording and certainly won't be my last. Greenberg, despite occasional over the top dramatics, is an excellent and enthusiastic scholar, musician and lecturer. The breadth of his knowledge and the selections of Mozart's music and a few of his contemporaries, was just enough to completely whet my appetite for more. As an historian, I appreciated his insistence on going to original sources for his information instead of relying on what other music scholars may have This was my first Great Course recording and certainly won't be my last. Greenberg, despite occasional over the top dramatics, is an excellent and enthusiastic scholar, musician and lecturer. The breadth of his knowledge and the selections of Mozart's music and a few of his contemporaries, was just enough to completely whet my appetite for more. As an historian, I appreciated his insistence on going to original sources for his information instead of relying on what other music scholars may have written or posited. There was nothing dry or boring in those sources he quoted. No, quite the contrary. They were often entertaining and always enlightening. Mozart had quite the scatological sense of humor. For example, Professor Greenberg took great pains to debunk the commonly held [often thanks to movies …I'm talking about you, Amadeus ...] notion that Mozart was some kind of idiot savant. Far from it, while he had his share of "issues", he generally functioned and engaged well in society and enjoyed much success. He was a tireless worker, churning out genius music at a prodigious rate, even when unwell or also working nearly full time as a performer, producer, teacher, husband and father. He was a one of a kind prodigy, which of course means he was/is often misunderstood. This is not an exhaustive course, with just 8 45+minute lectures, punctuated with snippets of music to illustrate his points, but it was enlightening enough to be riveting. I love listening to classical music but like so many, my appreciation and understanding has been somewhat lacking. Now, I feel enriched enough to listen to Mozart with more appreciation.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Huff

    A relatively brief, but very lively, survey of Mozart's life and music. Robert Greenberg is a high energy, funny, occasionally corny lecturer, but very enjoyable. I wasn't expecting the "PG-13" rated language sprinkled here and there, but it was always in the context of quoting peculiar things Mozart or his family would say (bathroom humor, for instance). If nothing else it made this incredible genius of a composer seem a bit more human. Getting to listen to so many musical selections, with insi A relatively brief, but very lively, survey of Mozart's life and music. Robert Greenberg is a high energy, funny, occasionally corny lecturer, but very enjoyable. I wasn't expecting the "PG-13" rated language sprinkled here and there, but it was always in the context of quoting peculiar things Mozart or his family would say (bathroom humor, for instance). If nothing else it made this incredible genius of a composer seem a bit more human. Getting to listen to so many musical selections, with insight and details provided by Greenberg, was a sheer delight. I definitely learned some things I didn't know, and will listen to more of these courses in the future. Mozart was one of a kind, and I don't imagine his achievements will ever be equaled.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Really enjoyed this a lot! Mozart's life and music are so interesting... really well done. Also enjoyed all the debunking of the Mozart Myths (of which there are MANY!) Really enjoyed this a lot! Mozart's life and music are so interesting... really well done. Also enjoyed all the debunking of the Mozart Myths (of which there are MANY!)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jason Friedlander

    I've been breezing through these Robert Greenberg lectures, finishing the one on Haydn earlier in the week, writing a review that was pretty half-assed because it felt a bit too much like preaching to the choir. I'd think that if one is even faintly interested in the topic, the score that's on here is enough of a recommendation and none of these extra words would matter much. But here I am spending a couple of minutes writing all this anyway. I listened to most of these in the car, driving my fam I've been breezing through these Robert Greenberg lectures, finishing the one on Haydn earlier in the week, writing a review that was pretty half-assed because it felt a bit too much like preaching to the choir. I'd think that if one is even faintly interested in the topic, the score that's on here is enough of a recommendation and none of these extra words would matter much. But here I am spending a couple of minutes writing all this anyway. I listened to most of these in the car, driving my family back and forth from home to various meals and movies over the week. While I normally I listen to Great Courses lectures on my own so as not to bother or bore the rest of the passengers in the car with what may seem like esoteric ramblings about mythology or the mystical experience, I thought these might be fine because of the musical interludes scattered throughout. I didn't expect anyone to be listening, but thought it would at least occasionally sound like pleasant background noise to their own conversations. I had on the 4th lecture of the series as we were off to have lunch at an Indian restaurant. Traffic wasn't too bad and the trip prematurely ended the recording with ten minutes left to go. When I shut the engine off my mom suddenly exclaimed: "Wait, but what happened to Mozart? Did he go back to his father?" I didn't realize she was listening. Or paying attention. So I assured her that I'd pause it and continue it after lunch. It seemed like she wanted to stay in the car and hear it to the end more than I did. I was pretty hungry. Since then she's been talking about Mozart and his life, how talented he was, how he was treated by his family. As someone who has never heard his own mother express any interest in music in his life—let alone having it be classical music— I think this is worth sharing as a testament to how engaging and entertaining these lectures are. Now to convince everyone else. post: As I was about to post this review she suddenly walked into my room and asked: So what happened after Mozart died? Was that the end? I'll let her know later I have one on Beethoven.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Selene Peck

    Having listened to many of Robert Greenberg's courses, I was expecting excellence. I got it! Wonderful and witty commentary encompasses the entire set of lectures; breathtaking music is played and explored; his life is respectfully and tastefully examined. Well done, Professor Greenberg. Much appreciation! Having listened to many of Robert Greenberg's courses, I was expecting excellence. I got it! Wonderful and witty commentary encompasses the entire set of lectures; breathtaking music is played and explored; his life is respectfully and tastefully examined. Well done, Professor Greenberg. Much appreciation!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    I love classical music, great biographies, and fine writing, so Robert Greenberg’s biography of Mozart, for me, is splendid. I will be reading more of Greenberg’s books about music and composers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Peppered with musical excerpts, Professor Greenberg presents a well-researched and engaging biography of the composer, musician, and man Wolfgang Mozart. The professor is animated, passionate, and extremely knowledgeable about Mozart, his contemporaries, and their music. Using primary sources and providing excellent overviews of the historical, social, political, and musical contexts in which Mozart lived, he debunks the myths that sprung up surrounding Mozart and tries to give the listener the m Peppered with musical excerpts, Professor Greenberg presents a well-researched and engaging biography of the composer, musician, and man Wolfgang Mozart. The professor is animated, passionate, and extremely knowledgeable about Mozart, his contemporaries, and their music. Using primary sources and providing excellent overviews of the historical, social, political, and musical contexts in which Mozart lived, he debunks the myths that sprung up surrounding Mozart and tries to give the listener the most accurate representation of the actual historical person behind all the legend. Mozart has never been so accessible to modern minds. Professor Greenberg is able to illustrate Mozart's humanity without downplaying his musical genius. My only complaint is that this course wasn't longer.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jared Gillins

    Good lectures overall. Greenberg's main point seemed to be that the depiction of Mozart in "Amadeus" is not at all accurate. He wants us to appreciate the man with all his complexities. Good lectures overall. Greenberg's main point seemed to be that the depiction of Mozart in "Amadeus" is not at all accurate. He wants us to appreciate the man with all his complexities.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Augusto Bernardi

    A lot of what we know and don't know about Mozart the person is largely based on his legacy and what people assumed of him after his lifetime as accounts of his life during his lifetime aren't reliable. Even his "middle" name Amadeus, was apparently only a stage nickname that only HE would use in jest in letters but nowhere of it written that that is his name. From some popular culture and also from his wife's account, he was a simpleton but that doesn't seem to match all the evidence of his lif A lot of what we know and don't know about Mozart the person is largely based on his legacy and what people assumed of him after his lifetime as accounts of his life during his lifetime aren't reliable. Even his "middle" name Amadeus, was apparently only a stage nickname that only HE would use in jest in letters but nowhere of it written that that is his name. From some popular culture and also from his wife's account, he was a simpleton but that doesn't seem to match all the evidence of his life. His God like status, literally, isn't quite as undeniable either as Mozart during his lifetime was not liked by all like he likely was after his life. Many including monarchs have criticised his work to be too long and far too complicated for the general public to understand and some have even described it for being vulgar for its sexual nature. A lot of these assumptions about Mozart are made to rationalise his immense skill and creativity residuals at a young age. You make him to a freak, a God or witchcraft like the magic ring on his hand. When trying to explain his abilities, you must bring up his important relationship with his controlling father. Based on the traditional norms in family and career, his father was rather rebellious to his family and eventually pursued music against his families wishes. His only son(besides his eldest daughter) Wolfgang was his main life goal. Wolfgang was pretty much homeschooled and had his father as his primary tutor. At the age of 5 already showing some composing abilities and promise, Leopold took his children on a long and epic European tour which changed Mozart's life from prospect to composer. This tour must have deeply affected his psychology at such a young age. This sickly and small boy always deeply desired the affection and approval of his strict father pushing himself to work harder. But his father also needed his son as he used his son as a crutch for his own unsuccessful career. Interestingly enough, one of Mozart's biggest influences at an early stage in his life bedsides his father was Johann Cristian Bach, one of the many sons of the great J. Sebastian Bach. Although he is short of forgotten in history, unlike his father, J.C still a great composer at the time and was a sort of friend or mentor to Mozart besides the clear age difference and his blending of Italian melody and German rhythm was something that became also characteristic of his work. In different countries, the expectations and reception towards Mozart was different so he was challenged accordingly, particularly in Italy, which his father hated. His father's tight grip on how Mozart would write his music would become key into how Mozart would later rebel against him and alsocompose without him. Some particularly interesting details were how the numbering of symphonies were occasionally wrong. As a young adult his stardom didn't necessarily carry through and he has some difficulties with patron dying/changing and having to work again in music instead of composing. Mozart in his early twenties traveled had some major changes in his life. He traveled to Paris with this mother and had a difficulty finding any job, likely because he didn't want to. He fell in love for the first time too which plays a part in his sexual nature that clearly comes across in his music. This also affected his relationship with his father. His mother died quickly of some disease and things got even worse with his father, blaming him for her death and claiming he owed him money. Eventually when Mozart did marry Constansa, his father did disinherited Mozart and their relationship was never the same again. Mozart likely hated his father especially in the years following this as everything that was withheld from him up to then, was drastically overturned after. Mozart for one of his big breaks in Munich in an serious Opera. By his late twenties, Mozart was becoming a musical superstar in Vienna. He was rich and spent his money well. Had many dogs and a bird, likely a gambler too. I really liked how Greenberg as a lot of personal insights on Mozart like even his obsession on saying "lick my ass" which is such a crass German saying. Lecture tracks about how he was friends and deeply admitted the great Heiden, and the great works that came forth from that. As a musician himself, Greenberg picks up on details such as a distinguishing fracture of Mozart's mature music was using the brass instruments as their own separate element as opposed to just reinforcing the string instruments. By now it is very clear that Mozart unlike what pop culture has portrayed him as, was very hard working and a intelligent man. Not a good given talent to a bumbling idiot that never grew up. A few personal details that were divulged in his let's that is rather impressive though we're the absurd work hours in the early morning or late night he composed for. And by composed I mean he simply copied down what was already in his head. The fact that Mozart has a fantastic eat for music and could improvise well and drafted very little of his music was indeed something very impressive. One account of him performing had him only having time to write down the music for the violin and he would play his part off the top of his head. Finally when his father died, Mozart did not interior anything and was not a sad man at all and wrote a piece to spite the memory of his father. Mozart in his late twenties and early thirties was in the prime of his career in terms of success (not his finances) and was producing some of his most important operas. He traveled a lot and many argue that Mozart would have reached greater success had he stayed in Prague. I actually really enjoyed how Greenberg explains to people like me who are not as familiar with Mozart's music, what to look out for and what we're some of the stand out features of the operas. There is a tremendous amount of internal politics involved with the creation of these works in terms of the writers and performers and their egos. Besides Mozart's abysmal finances, constantly needing loans and taking jobs that would even require him to give over the credit of his work to other people (like his last piece, the Requiem), his marriage was also not great as being the superstar that he was in theatre and music, the man was a very promiscuous. Well finally in the last lecture, it deals with the mysterious case of his death. There are endless conspiracy theories behind trying to explain it but there is little to no evidence behind any of them, including the one by Salieri himself decades later as a old man after slitting his own throat, saying that he was the one poisoning Mozart. This is where the Hollywood movie Amadeus is based on. What likely did happen was that it was an accumulation of factors. First of and most importantly, Mozart was for pretty much most his life a sickly man and likely had rheumatoid fever which was common at the time, he was likely overworked with very poor sleeping patterns, according to his letters, he was likely depressed and lastly, it's documented that bloodletting was performed on his death which would have worsened everything. Since he was not upper class at the time, Mozart was buried in a common grave along with many others and therefore had no official testing place. Many biographies came in years after his death which spread the majority of the rumours, including one from his wife which she made a lot of money from. The man had a incredibly short life and even shorter career but in that span, produced a rather large amount of music that had a deep impact at the time and even deeper after his death with his godlike legacy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Amadeus has been one of my favorite movies since I was a teen. Greenberg gives a more nuanced account of Mozart's life and separates the myth from the man in a highly engrossing series of lectures. Being a non-musician, I appreciated his ability to explain musical concepts in an easygoing, understandable manner, which was then followed by the actual, wondrous music itself. Greenberg has a very conversational style of delivering his lectures, complete with wit, humor, and "dad jokes," so there wa Amadeus has been one of my favorite movies since I was a teen. Greenberg gives a more nuanced account of Mozart's life and separates the myth from the man in a highly engrossing series of lectures. Being a non-musician, I appreciated his ability to explain musical concepts in an easygoing, understandable manner, which was then followed by the actual, wondrous music itself. Greenberg has a very conversational style of delivering his lectures, complete with wit, humor, and "dad jokes," so there was never a moment where this series became tedious. I will definitely seek out more of his Great Courses!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Richardson

    “I write as a sow piddles.” - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Another great course from Professor Greenberg! The best part of these courses is listening to the great music and learning the whys and wherefores on how they became. The most important things I learned in this course were the stupid myths that were torn down by Mr. Greenberg and the fact that Mozart was a person with a peculiar sense of humor. I highly recommend this course as it was one of my favorites. I checked it out at my local library.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carl Palmateer

    This is mainly about the life of Mozart. His music is bought out but is mainly examined in light of its progression and impact. The music itself, as music, is lightly touched upon but as the Professor repeatedly mentions this course is too short to properly address the music. The main thing you get from this course is that Mozart was human. Extremely talented but not an idiot savant, bumbling buffoon, or child-like (once he was no longer a child). By the end of the course you will have a far grea This is mainly about the life of Mozart. His music is bought out but is mainly examined in light of its progression and impact. The music itself, as music, is lightly touched upon but as the Professor repeatedly mentions this course is too short to properly address the music. The main thing you get from this course is that Mozart was human. Extremely talented but not an idiot savant, bumbling buffoon, or child-like (once he was no longer a child). By the end of the course you will have a far greater appreciation of Mozart and a far better understanding.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    Yay! The GC+ has added more of Professor Bob's lectures, and this short (8 part) GC is most entertaining. I thought there might not be much new here given how many of his previous lectures I've done and how much he'd covered in them. I was wrong. Lots of interesting tidbits here, especially about his childhood and his dysfunctional family. (Leopold Mozart was such a pill.) Yay! The GC+ has added more of Professor Bob's lectures, and this short (8 part) GC is most entertaining. I thought there might not be much new here given how many of his previous lectures I've done and how much he'd covered in them. I was wrong. Lots of interesting tidbits here, especially about his childhood and his dysfunctional family. (Leopold Mozart was such a pill.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Jade

    Listened to it in Audio book form, and Robert is phenomenal. I don't normally call my self somebody who is interested in music, and had hoped that I would get an understanding of why people enjoy music. Robert delivered and more. Listened to it in Audio book form, and Robert is phenomenal. I don't normally call my self somebody who is interested in music, and had hoped that I would get an understanding of why people enjoy music. Robert delivered and more.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Great lecture to listen to!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tamminh

    A thoughtful scholarly research, delivered by a wildly entertaining teacher!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dele Omotosho

    Can't ever go wrong with my favorite Music Professor Can't ever go wrong with my favorite Music Professor

  18. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Troese

    Anything Robert Greenberg touches is gold. He’s entertaining, informative, funny, and conveys his topic beautifully. I recommend this course along with all of his others. This one provides an objective, interesting view into the life and people that influenced one of the great geniuses of history.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Birk

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the second series of Greenberg's I've read, the first being "How to Listen to and Understand Great Music." I like Greenberg's approach, humor, breadth of knowledge and style. Mozart is truly one of the individuals necessary to be familiar with when it comes to great music. This series dispels many myths commonly associated with Mozart (was he autistic, was he murdered by poison, etc). If you've seen the movie "Amadeus" this book will clear up a lot of those myths put forth in the movie. This is the second series of Greenberg's I've read, the first being "How to Listen to and Understand Great Music." I like Greenberg's approach, humor, breadth of knowledge and style. Mozart is truly one of the individuals necessary to be familiar with when it comes to great music. This series dispels many myths commonly associated with Mozart (was he autistic, was he murdered by poison, etc). If you've seen the movie "Amadeus" this book will clear up a lot of those myths put forth in the movie. His relationship with is father was not one to be modeled (very much his father's fault). Mozart was indeed gifted and talented and luckily channeled those gifts to our benefit through hard work and commitment. Various pieces of music are showcased throughout the series. It was good for me to get to know Mozart better, his genius, his foibles and his impact on the music world.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Robert Greenberg is my favorite lecturer by and large. He brings great enthusiasm to his subjects and inspires a desire to hear more. This lecture series is devoted to the life of Mozart and a brief look at some of his more famous compositions. Mostly it is biopic, though, and Greenberg explores some of the more controversial aspects of Mozart's short life. For instance, he takes on the autism debate and explores that thoroughly through several lectures. He also discusses his death and the vario Robert Greenberg is my favorite lecturer by and large. He brings great enthusiasm to his subjects and inspires a desire to hear more. This lecture series is devoted to the life of Mozart and a brief look at some of his more famous compositions. Mostly it is biopic, though, and Greenberg explores some of the more controversial aspects of Mozart's short life. For instance, he takes on the autism debate and explores that thoroughly through several lectures. He also discusses his death and the various theories surrounding the cause. And there is also a good deal of attention paid to the father-son relationship and its impact on Mozart's music. Fascinating lectures that certainly provide insight into the composer and the man.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    I’m trying to learn more about a variety of subjects and I’m not counting lecture series as part of my reading challenge but I wanted to at least share that these are worth listening to. I loved the movie Amadeus as a kid and knew it was wildly inaccurate but wanted to find out more about Mozart in general. It’d be difficult to learn about the man without also listening to the pieces being discussed. My only quibble is that Dr Greenberg lays it on a bit thick at times, he’s almost like a carniva I’m trying to learn more about a variety of subjects and I’m not counting lecture series as part of my reading challenge but I wanted to at least share that these are worth listening to. I loved the movie Amadeus as a kid and knew it was wildly inaccurate but wanted to find out more about Mozart in general. It’d be difficult to learn about the man without also listening to the pieces being discussed. My only quibble is that Dr Greenberg lays it on a bit thick at times, he’s almost like a carnival barker when he should be showing maybe a tad more restraint. But otherwise it’s an excellent series of lectures. Now I want to read Maynard Solomon’s biographies.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ycel

    “Along the way [Mozart] got married; fathered seven children (two of whom survived into adulthood); performed as a pianist; violinist; and conductor; maintained a successful teaching studio; wrote thousands of letters; traveled widely; attended the theater religiously; played cards, billiards, and bocce; and rode horseback for exercise. Not bad for someone portrayed as a giggling idiot in the movies.” Thoroughly engaging and enjoyable. Robert Greenberg puts all the right sound bites into this le “Along the way [Mozart] got married; fathered seven children (two of whom survived into adulthood); performed as a pianist; violinist; and conductor; maintained a successful teaching studio; wrote thousands of letters; traveled widely; attended the theater religiously; played cards, billiards, and bocce; and rode horseback for exercise. Not bad for someone portrayed as a giggling idiot in the movies.” Thoroughly engaging and enjoyable. Robert Greenberg puts all the right sound bites into this lecture.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sher

    Although I have always had a great appreciation for the music of Mozart and truly love many of the things he has written, I can’t say that he has been one of my all time favorite composers. With the insights I gained from this Great Courses class taught by Dr. Robert Greenberg, I must say the great genius has moved up in my estimation. My understanding of his music is markedly better, and I can now say he truly is one of my favorite composers. The world lost him way too soon at the age of nearly Although I have always had a great appreciation for the music of Mozart and truly love many of the things he has written, I can’t say that he has been one of my all time favorite composers. With the insights I gained from this Great Courses class taught by Dr. Robert Greenberg, I must say the great genius has moved up in my estimation. My understanding of his music is markedly better, and I can now say he truly is one of my favorite composers. The world lost him way too soon at the age of nearly 36, but thank goodness for the things he was able to give us.

  24. 5 out of 5

    R. August

    Good information, but the style of presentation sort of rubbed me the wrong way. When you keep saying Mozart died at the "obscenely" young age of 35, and repeat how "obscenely" young he was over and over again, and then blithely skim over all of Mozart's siblings who died in infancy and all Mozart's children who died in infancy, and then talk more about how obscenely young Mozart was...well, that type of hyperbole makes one suspect to the actual analysis of the music which is offered. Good information, but the style of presentation sort of rubbed me the wrong way. When you keep saying Mozart died at the "obscenely" young age of 35, and repeat how "obscenely" young he was over and over again, and then blithely skim over all of Mozart's siblings who died in infancy and all Mozart's children who died in infancy, and then talk more about how obscenely young Mozart was...well, that type of hyperbole makes one suspect to the actual analysis of the music which is offered.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    Professor Greenberg is both knowledgeable and entertaining in his sharing of the details of Mozart's life and music. This Great Masters series is perfect for fans of the great composers who would like to know more about them. My only regret with this series is that there isn't more depth of knowledge, but working within the confines of the format would certainly lead to those shortcomings. Even so, a great introduction to the composer and his music. Professor Greenberg is both knowledgeable and entertaining in his sharing of the details of Mozart's life and music. This Great Masters series is perfect for fans of the great composers who would like to know more about them. My only regret with this series is that there isn't more depth of knowledge, but working within the confines of the format would certainly lead to those shortcomings. Even so, a great introduction to the composer and his music.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michele Smith

    This was an incredible, insightful overview of the life of Mozart. The narrator was very knowledgeable and injected his own wit and humor into the telling. This was easy to listen to and very entertaining, and gave great insights into this renowned composer. It inspired me to read the biography of Mozart by Maynard Solomon, which is referenced in the lecture. I am not a fan of fiction audiobooks, but absolutely love the Great Courses lecture series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Mozart is my favorite composer. His work speaks more to me than any other composer. He has a way of provoking deep thought with the graceful flow of his pieces. I felt this collection of lectures really explained his life wonderfully. Greenberg also did a wonderful job of bringing excitement to the material.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Aldrich

    This is certainly the way to do a biography for a musician/composer -- far better than simply reading a book without the ability to hear the music or comment upon it. My only criticism is that it was far too short and over all too quickly.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I love Robert Greenberg and everything he says. Practically everything I know about music, I've learned from him. Now, I love Mozart too. (Well, I already loved Mozart, but now I love him in a whole new way). I love Robert Greenberg and everything he says. Practically everything I know about music, I've learned from him. Now, I love Mozart too. (Well, I already loved Mozart, but now I love him in a whole new way).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Books-fly-to-me

    Listening to this made me want to immerse myself in Mozart's music for a year. Professor Robert Greenberg is knowledgeable and interesting. He brings clarity to history without imposing his own prejudices. I like him enormously. Listening to this made me want to immerse myself in Mozart's music for a year. Professor Robert Greenberg is knowledgeable and interesting. He brings clarity to history without imposing his own prejudices. I like him enormously.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...