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Henry Ford: A Life From Beginning to End

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Henry Ford Henry Ford once announced to a young schoolboy that it was he who had invented the modern age. Born on a farm in rural Michigan three weeks after the battle of Gettysburg, Ford hated everything about farming as soon as he could understand what it was about. So he turned his attention to the farm machinery that made the family farm run, and never looked back. It Henry Ford Henry Ford once announced to a young schoolboy that it was he who had invented the modern age. Born on a farm in rural Michigan three weeks after the battle of Gettysburg, Ford hated everything about farming as soon as he could understand what it was about. So he turned his attention to the farm machinery that made the family farm run, and never looked back. It was his love of machines, then engines, and finally automobiles that Henry Ford is best known for. He designed and manufactured cars which would transform not just his family's little farm, and not just the city of Detroit. The automobile would change the world; ushering in a whole new way of living one's life. A modern life, to be sure. Beneath this diligent tycoon, lay a man of many contradictions. He worked hard to give the average American an affordable car and believed that mass consumerism was the key to keeping the world safe from war. Yet he opposed labor unions, supposedly sired a son with another woman, and was an enthusiastic anti-Semite. Inside you will read about... ✓ Henry Ford's Early Years ✓ Ford's Love for Engines ✓ The Ford Motor Company and the Model T ✓ Disdain of Labor Unions ✓ The Anti-Semite Problem ✓ Later Years and Death And much more! Follow along as you come to know Henry Ford, the man responsible for putting America and the world behind the wheels of their own cars. Was this man a genius or a dominator? Did he want those around him to live free lives with the things he invented or was he only satisfied when people read his newspaper and obeyed his advice? Read on, and form your own conclusion.


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Henry Ford Henry Ford once announced to a young schoolboy that it was he who had invented the modern age. Born on a farm in rural Michigan three weeks after the battle of Gettysburg, Ford hated everything about farming as soon as he could understand what it was about. So he turned his attention to the farm machinery that made the family farm run, and never looked back. It Henry Ford Henry Ford once announced to a young schoolboy that it was he who had invented the modern age. Born on a farm in rural Michigan three weeks after the battle of Gettysburg, Ford hated everything about farming as soon as he could understand what it was about. So he turned his attention to the farm machinery that made the family farm run, and never looked back. It was his love of machines, then engines, and finally automobiles that Henry Ford is best known for. He designed and manufactured cars which would transform not just his family's little farm, and not just the city of Detroit. The automobile would change the world; ushering in a whole new way of living one's life. A modern life, to be sure. Beneath this diligent tycoon, lay a man of many contradictions. He worked hard to give the average American an affordable car and believed that mass consumerism was the key to keeping the world safe from war. Yet he opposed labor unions, supposedly sired a son with another woman, and was an enthusiastic anti-Semite. Inside you will read about... ✓ Henry Ford's Early Years ✓ Ford's Love for Engines ✓ The Ford Motor Company and the Model T ✓ Disdain of Labor Unions ✓ The Anti-Semite Problem ✓ Later Years and Death And much more! Follow along as you come to know Henry Ford, the man responsible for putting America and the world behind the wheels of their own cars. Was this man a genius or a dominator? Did he want those around him to live free lives with the things he invented or was he only satisfied when people read his newspaper and obeyed his advice? Read on, and form your own conclusion.

30 review for Henry Ford: A Life From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    RM(Alwaysdaddygirl)

    Intersting These book series are meant to be short. Regardless, there a lot of interesting history for a short book. It why the grammar mistakes were not a bother. I also like how he touch on the bad and good of Henry Ford. I just wish it had a reference section. That is why I did not give it five stars. 🇺🇸🤙

  2. 4 out of 5

    Young Kim

    (Hourly History, "Henry Ford," Kindle Ed., 2017, p. 2) ...His Ford Motor Company would revolutionize the way business is conducted. Finally, not just cars, but many staples of everyday life, were being made affordable for the average person. Not only were his factories innovative, but Ford introduced a living wage, something much touted in the news these days. His $5 a day wage was equivalent to $120 today. Everyone wanted to work for Henry Ford, and that too was part of his magic. For it was a m (Hourly History, "Henry Ford," Kindle Ed., 2017, p. 2) ...His Ford Motor Company would revolutionize the way business is conducted. Finally, not just cars, but many staples of everyday life, were being made affordable for the average person. Not only were his factories innovative, but Ford introduced a living wage, something much touted in the news these days. His $5 a day wage was equivalent to $120 today. Everyone wanted to work for Henry Ford, and that too was part of his magic. For it was a magical time in America and all across the Western world. New inventions, some re-worked from medieval times were suddenly being used far and wide. In addition to men being able to find viable jobs, women and minorities were also given consideration by Henry Ford. But for all of his goodness, there was an anti-Semitic streak which would haunt him all of his days. It may have come from beliefs emanating from his childhood, and always resided in the background. Yeah, he was even awarded a medal from Nazi Party in Germany at the time. The book starts with a pr’etty en-/ in-form'at-ive entr'/ intr'o-duct'ion. But unfortunately, the “background” cannot be found anywhere in this book “disappointing” the readers’ high expectations from the fine introduction. (Kindle Ed., pp. 10-13) ...his company was closed. Some people would just walk away, discouraged and never seek to take the plunge again. But not Henry Ford. With the help of C. Harold Wills, who would go on to be one of the first employees of the Ford Motor Company, Ford designed and built a 26-horsepower automobile in October 1901. He raced this car along with others in a head-to-head, and no one came close to being as fast. Because of this success, Ford's former backer William Murphy and other stockholders formed the Henry Ford Company in November 1901 with Henry Ford as chief engineer. Although he didn't own the company, Ford was happy with the position he was in...Central to producing as many Model T's as he did, Ford couldn't have done it without the development of the assembly line. This was the key to increasing efficiency and keeping costs low. Ford was not the one who invented the assembly line, but he did perfect it. Before the assembly line as Ford created it, cars were individually built by teams of skilled workers. This process was slow and expensive...The assembly line, as Ford envisioned it, was perfected in the years 1908-1913. Charles Sorensen, one of Ford's employees, was instrumental in making improvements to the method. This sort of great lessons found throughout the pages saved the book from getting a 2-star rate despite the book’s incomplete quality: It's never a man who makes great things, but always a group of people as one. We only remember a name, but there's always many others’ behind the scene. You will find the same example in the following Tom Edison's review. The book appears to be well-researched: (Ibid., p. 21) Way back in 1903, the Ford Motor Company had debuted its first automobile, the Model A. This original car came with a price tag of $800 to $900. It came as a two-seater runabout, a popular version of early cars, which meant it had no windshield, top, or doors. It was a well-liked car up until 1915. There was also a “tonneau” model, which was a hard or a soft cover used to protect the passenger seats and could be removed. There is an old song from the Broadway musical Oklahoma which is titled “The Surrey With The Fringe On Top.” That would be a Model A. Yup, it was the first Model A, not the second one popular in 1927 to 1930. The readers might get confused, but the author talks about the "new" Model A later in the following lines too. There are lots of lessons to learn from the man’s story, and, conveniently, we can find a lot in this short book. And just count how many crisis he had to face to overcome: (Ibid., p. 10) The following year, Murphy brought in Henry M. Leland as a consultant. By this time, Leland was almost 60 years old and knew a lot about engineering and precision machining. Once this happened, Ford left the company bearing his name. Leland would go on to create the Cadillac automobile and Murphy renamed the company the Cadillac Automobile Company. So, Henry Ford moved on once again...At first, sales were slow. With marketing not being what it is today, Ford and Malcomson were having a tough time moving their cars. To make matters worse, the Dodge brothers were soon on their doorstep looking for their money. This caused Ford a financial dilemma. If you don’t face them head on, you never overcome them. (Ibid., pp. 8-9) "...I see no use in spending a great deal of time learning about heaven and hell. In my opinion, a man makes his own heaven and hell and carries it around with him. Both of them are states of mind...Don't find fault, find a remedy." The book also reveals the dark history of the man. (Ibid., p. 27) Louis Marshall, chairman of the American Jewish Committee, brokered an agreement whereby Ford announced that any articles reflective of the Jews would never appear in his newspaper again. Ford was “mortified” to learn that The Protocols of the Elders of Zion were fake; he even offered Jews his “future friendship and goodwill.” In December 1927, the Independent was closed for good...It was unclear how much contact Ford's Dearborn facilities had with Germany after 1941. They claim they were completely cut off. There has been speculation yet nothing has been proven. After the war, Ford sued the U.S. Government for wartime damages in which his German facilities had been destroyed due to Allied bombings. He receives almost one million dollars, mostly for damage done to a military truck complex in Cologne. The military trucks that carried then-en’emy troops to the line against the American men and women in serv’ice? Not cool, Mr. Ford. I wonder why he has not been considered a selfish traitor? Maybe he had become the secret dark power that was controlling the U.S.-led world behind the scenes. Why not? He was more than wealthy enough to “buy” the American politicians’ “cover” for him. (Ibid., p. 28) ...Ford continued to do business with Nazi Germany, including the manufacture of war materiel. He did line up behind the war effort when war was declared in December 1941. Once America was in the war, Ford directed that a new factory at Willow Run near Detroit, be built. Ground was broken there in 1942, and the first B-24 came off the line in October. Being the largest assembly-line in the world at the time, the Willow Run plant produced 650 B-24s every month. What was the man's "principle?" Just follow the public demand right before his eyes? Well, you’ve seen one of his dictums introduced above, and that’s how he successfully ran his businesses. Although he had vision for rapid social development and progress, not really a man of morality after all, he was one of the most complex men in history. (Ibid., p. 29) Living in a post-modern age, where it has all been done for us, it's easy to lose sight of how revolutionary these inventions actually were. Picture a town without cars, with dirt paths for roads, spotty electricity, and a single phone down at the general store. This was the world of the young Henry Ford. And if you wanted to get somewhere, you either walked or rode a horse. Ford had yet to use that “horsepower” to rein in his vehicles. Sounds great, but it could have been “really” great if the man built public transportation run by energy other than fossil fuel, so his fellow Americans in the later years wouldn't have to be stuck with too much energy issues. Seriously it is the richest country that is the most sensitive about any energy issues happening around the globe as it is the richest country that still doesn't have a single bullet train line at all, and this is the reason why we are headed for another global warfare in a pace faster that ever before. (Ibid., pp. 29-30) Ford was wise enough to appreciate his workers to the point of giving them a good living wage and a 5-day workweek. No one, up to this point, cared too much to do such a thing...Henry Ford never understood or appreciated his only acknowledged son, Edsel. It is said that he hounded him to death. Where the young Edsel wanted to introduce different colors and more convenience into their cars, he was constantly bullied by his father. Yet, Henry never got over his son's death. After Edsel's death, Henry was often seen wandering the roads around Greenfield Village at night...it is highly likely that America was transformed by what he brought to it. He not only figured out a new way of making his cars, but his assembly-line philosophy would also carry over into the wars he so adamantly opposed. Nowhere close to the amount of material produced could have been achieved, had it not been for his insight. Yup, the United States had over 100 aircraft carriers during WW2, and that was the power that won the global war for the allies, no doubt. She rose to be the leader of the globe thanks to people like Henry Ford, but ironically, she is declining the fastest among all the global hegemons in history because of the people like Henry Ford. Although it is informative with lots of lessons to learn, the book is incomplete with many errors, so it needs a thorough editing work for the readers. (Kindle Ed., p. 9) ...He passionately believed that no one ever makes mistakes, and he felt that everyone is put on earth for a purpose. It is your life's work to figure out what that purpose is. Mistakes, according to Ford, were more like the stepping-stones of life. What? ...... Correction: ...He passionately believed that everyone is put on earth for a purpose. It is your life's work to figure out what that purpose is. Mistakes, according to Ford, were more like the stepping-stones of life. (Ibid., pp. 18-19) When World War I erupted, Henry Ford opposed it, seeing it as a colossal waste. Ford became one of the country's most outspoken public figure to disapprove of the war. He stayed far away from people who were profiting from it. In 1915, Ford along with other pacifists were determined to do something about ending the fighting. Because of his vast wealth, Ford had another home in Fort Myers, Florida, right next door to his good friend Thomas Edison. One of the people whom Ford had invited to his home there, was the Hungarian-born Jewish pacifist and feminist, Rosika Schwimmer. Together, they agreed to fund a “Peace Ship” and head to Europe. Ford and 170 prominent peace leaders traveled to the Netherlands and then to Sweden. Even his own pastor, Reverend Samuel Marquis, went along for the ride. President Wilson didn't give this mission any support, but that didn’t stop the voyage. Unfortunately, the ship was a target of great ridicule, and once it reached Sweden, Ford left it and returned home. It was around this time that Henry Ford's anti-Semitism began to raise its ugly head. Before the ship embarked for Europe, Ford had told Rosika Schwimmer that “I know who caused the war—the German-Jewish bankers. I have the evidence here.” And he deftly patted his jacket pocket. He declared he had facts which he couldn't reveal at the time because he didn't have them all. Early in the war, Ford's factories in Britain were producing tractors to increase the British food supply, but eventually, they were used for making trucks and aircraft engines. When the U.S. entered the war in 1917, all factories became major suppliers of weapons, especially the Liberty engine for airplanes and anti-submarine boats. Ford's plants were not spared. By 1918 with the war still going, President Woodrow Wilson encouraged Ford to run for the Senate seat in Michigan. Wilson was advocating for his League of Nations, which he formed as the war was winding down. The League was to be an intergovernmental organization, one that would put an end to all future wars. If Henry Ford ran and won in Michigan, Wilson believed that could tip the scales in Congress in favor of the League. The president wrote to Ford, “You are the only man in Michigan who can be elected and help bring about the peace you so desire.” Ford then wrote back to the president, “If they want to elect me let them do so, but I won't make a penny's investment.” Ford was on the ballot that year and came within 4,500 votes of actually winning the seat. Nevertheless, he remained in Wilson's corner and was always a supporter of the League of Nations. Once the war ended in November 1918, it was just one month later that Henry Ford turned over control of the Ford Motor Company to his son Edsel. He still retained the right to veto anything he didn't like, and there were sometimes disagreements between father and son. In the meantime, Ford started another company, Henry Ford and Son, where he made it known in influential circles that he was taking not only himself but all of his best employees to his new company. Ford was attempting to scare the remaining holdout stockholders of the Ford Motor Company into selling their shares to him before they lost value. Together with Edsel, Henry Ford began buying up the company's stock. The ruse worked, and father and son soon became sole owners of their business...Ford's private secretary Ernest Liebold had, in 1918, purchased a little-known weekly newspaper The Dearborn Independent which ran for the next eight years. Every Ford factory carried the paper and gave it out to all employees. This marked the start of the decade where Ford emerged as a “respected spokesmen for right-wing extremism and religious prejudice.” Once the Great War was just a memory, Ford set his sights on making his company internationally known. All these lines are contra’dicting with one an’other. What a self-contradicted man he really was! At the end of these lines Ford wasn't a man of morality at all, and it seems like his logic had serious flaws. What happened? Did he suffer from a betrayal or a mental illness during the Great War period? The book doesn't explain anything leaving a big hole of "disconnection" in the middle of the reading. The chapter needs another thorough revision and editing. (Ibid., p. 19) ...In 1919 when the Dodge brothers had won their lawsuit against the Ford Motor Company, neither one was able to enjoy their victory. John Dodge succumbed to the influenza epidemic that swept over the globe after World War I, and his brother Horace died of cirrhosis that same year. ...epidemic that swept through the globe...? So it was a "pandemic." Why keep calling it "epidemic" throughout the chapter? (Ibid., p. 20) ...True to his word, Henry Ford continued opening plants in Australia, India, and France. By 1929, Ford had successful dealerships on all six continents. So his new factories in “Great Britain and France” after all: The book should mention that all Ford had to deal with were the French and, mostly, the British author’ity to expand his businesses in the “British colonies across the globe.” It is an important fact of the time many readers might pass without not’icing if not mentioned. Above all, the entire Chapter One is off topic: Like 80 percent of all the lines in this chapter should be deleted or moved to an “other” chapter. And this following dict’um should be in Chapter Three: “Don't be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.” —John D. Rockefeller It is relevant to Chapter Three, not Chapter One. Looks like the author placed the dictums “randomly.” What a mess! Thus, the con-clos’/ -clus’ion: Although informative with lots of lessons to learn, the book is exhibiting some serious errors, hence it is incomplete and needs a thorough revision and editing work for the readers. You can read the full review here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    I found this one hour biography to be quite informative. He did not invent the automobile, rather he would produce a car that was within the economic reach of most Americans. He created not only the Model T but the assembly line to go with it. The Model T opened up the country like never before, long before there were good roads for it to run on. In 1914, Ford astonished the world by introducing a $5 per day wage ($120 by today's standards.) By 1932, one third of all vehicles in the world were p I found this one hour biography to be quite informative. He did not invent the automobile, rather he would produce a car that was within the economic reach of most Americans. He created not only the Model T but the assembly line to go with it. The Model T opened up the country like never before, long before there were good roads for it to run on. In 1914, Ford astonished the world by introducing a $5 per day wage ($120 by today's standards.) By 1932, one third of all vehicles in the world were produced by Ford Motor Company. I was quite surprised at Ford's anti-Semitic views, accusing Jews of both the first and the second World War. Ford never understood or appreciated his son, Edsel. It is said that he hounded him to death, although he mourned him after his death. In 1945, Ford gave his company presidency to his grandson, Henry Ford II. Ford died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 83 in 1947. I found this book to be worth the read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David W.

    Son of Ford Too brief of explanation of Mr Ford and is intricate & sometimes troubling personality. While his lifestyle might have been simplistic - his attitude towards many significant facets of the world were certainly not (simple).

  5. 5 out of 5

    derick prentice

    Godd read but not enough of the man rather the model T.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    This biography begins with a short summary of life, both political and social, of the United States during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. After the Civil War and the consequent Reconstruction that followed, the nation was once again united and connected with a railroad from the east coast to the west. Thoughts turned to settling the vast areas opened by the railroad. This was the perfect time for the United States to enter the industrial revolution; something that was well underway This biography begins with a short summary of life, both political and social, of the United States during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. After the Civil War and the consequent Reconstruction that followed, the nation was once again united and connected with a railroad from the east coast to the west. Thoughts turned to settling the vast areas opened by the railroad. This was the perfect time for the United States to enter the industrial revolution; something that was well underway in Europe. Americans embraced this new revolution with a passion and Henry Ford, like an icon, was at its vanguard. By the last decade of the century, the United States had the most factories and raw materials, sophisticated marketing and a very efficient transportation system; Europe could no longer compete against this new industrial superpower. With the colossal number of factories, came an enormous number of workers. Like in Europe, the working conditions were poor. This also marked the birth of labor unions, to strive for higher wages and safer working conditions. Henry Ford was born, as the oldest of five children, on July 30, 1863, in Greenfield Township, Michigan on his father’s farm, but as he grew up, he soon realized that farming wasn’t for him. Contrary to popular belief, Henry Ford didn’t invent the automobile. He did have a vision and a stubborn determination to make this vision a reality. Ford wanted to produce an affordable car for everyone. Aside from improving the assembly line, Ford developed a multitude of innovations that helped to keep the production costs low. He may not have the honor of invention but he did improve existing inventions, making them work more efficiently. Thanks to Ford, the average man could buy and drive his automobiles and this changed the world. In 1914, Ford introduced the $5-per-day wage, almost doubling the average salary. This forced other companies to match him or risk losing their best workers. Strangely enough, Henry Ford held labor unions in great disdain, stating that they, more often than not, brought hardships on the working man. As you read this short biography, you get a brief glance of a great innovator; a man with multiple facets and a few human faults.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jares

    In Henry Ford's early teens, his father gave him a pocket watch; by the time he was 15, he was disassembling and putting back timepieces together in minutes.  His friends and neighbors thought he was a watch repairer.  When his mother died (he was about 16 then), Henry decided he didn't want farm work and went to Detroit to apprentice as a machinist.  In 3 years, he learned all he could and returned to the farm. Henry was adept at keeping all the farm equipment working. Eventually, Henry was hire In Henry Ford's early teens, his father gave him a pocket watch; by the time he was 15, he was disassembling and putting back timepieces together in minutes.  His friends and neighbors thought he was a watch repairer.  When his mother died (he was about 16 then), Henry decided he didn't want farm work and went to Detroit to apprentice as a machinist.  In 3 years, he learned all he could and returned to the farm. Henry was adept at keeping all the farm equipment working. Eventually, Henry was hired by Westinghouse to service their steam engines.  At night, he studied bookkeeping.  I was not aware that Henry and Clara only had one child, Edsel. Henry was a man of his time; never give up.  He closed his first company, walked away from his second (which was changed to the Cadillac Automobile Co.), and opened a third (Ford & Malcomson, Ltd.).  Early models were built for the wealthy; the average man had no way to afford such complicated machinery.  Ford did not invent the car; he perfected the assembly line to construct it.  This reduced the cost of the autos over time.  Ford specialized in building autos the average man could afford. His designs also improved farming equipment.  This book talks about two things Henry Ford did not like:  Labor unions and Jews.  Eventually, he made peace with the labor unions.  When Henry found out that the information he was using to write damaging things about Jews was false, he was mortified.  I did not know Edsel Ford died of stomach cancer in 1943, putting Henry back in the driver's seat until the end of the war. Henry shared his wealth by doubling the daily wage of his workers and adding things like cafeterias and profit-sharing (unheard of at that time).  Henry Ford, through his actions, moved the working class into the middle class.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chandru CS

    Cleveland was thought to be a shoe-in until it was discovered that he had fathered a child out of wedlock, had placed that child in an orphanage and the mother in an insane asylum. Yet most people didn't seem to care and voted for him to be president, anyway. In 1886, anarchists gathered in Chicago's Haymarket Square to protest the police killing of labor strikers. Someone threw a bomb into the crowd, and when it was all over, eight policemen and several protesters had been killed. By December th Cleveland was thought to be a shoe-in until it was discovered that he had fathered a child out of wedlock, had placed that child in an orphanage and the mother in an insane asylum. Yet most people didn't seem to care and voted for him to be president, anyway. In 1886, anarchists gathered in Chicago's Haymarket Square to protest the police killing of labor strikers. Someone threw a bomb into the crowd, and when it was all over, eight policemen and several protesters had been killed. By December the American Federation of Labor was formed to organize skilled workers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    Ford - a leading industrialist Not the first to invent the car or assembly line but his vision brought an affordable car to the general public. He brought a living wage which would raise the middle class. He also had a negative side as an anti- Semite whom he felt financed and caused the world wars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yanwen

    Enjoy reading it! Recommend it greatly to all who want to understand American culture and history. I take home three things related to Ford from reading it. First, the birth of assembly line, second, the high pay of Ford auto workers (high for that time), third, Ford’s model-T put the nation on the wheel, literally.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ActiveUSCitizen

    Same time and effort A $5 a day wage was twice the rate of what most Americans were making at the time. Some business owners questioned Ford's motives; even believing he was a socialist. The day the doors were opened for applications, more than 10,000 men had lined up at the Highland Park factory to be hired. Same time and effort A $5 a day wage was twice the rate of what most Americans were making at the time. Some business owners questioned Ford's motives; even believing he was a socialist. The day the doors were opened for applications, more than 10,000 men had lined up at the Highland Park factory to be hired.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rubin Carpenter

    This is not a biography of Henry Ford This book is more of a history of the Automobile and the Ford Motor company than Henry Ford It lists his accomplishments and his innovations that changed the world his politics and opinions but nothing much of his family life or relationships a bland read

  13. 4 out of 5

    DOUGLAS J BERRY

    Hard to imagine the world without cars. Hourly history freebie, they pass them out on fridays for free. Suitable for all ages. A quick look at Henry Ford and his ups and downs. He could say some pretty odd stuff at times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Ganjoo

    A good initiative by Hourly History. This is a short and concise book with 40 page content. It could set a foundation to what Henry Ford is remembered for- revolutionalising mass production and the entire automobile industry

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Robb

    Having visited the Henry Ford Museum and Village in Michigan, it was interesting to learn more about the man. This is a bare bones biography, so there are some places where I would have been interested to know more than what the author had written.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amit gupta

    Loved to read this short biography.. To get to know about the Henery Ford. Nice book. Loved to read this short biography.. To get to know about the Henery Ford. Nice book to read if you like to know about Mr Ford.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Don Packett

    A fascinatingly (speedy) account of Henry Ford’s life mission and how we worked tirelessly to make it a reality.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mihir Parekh

    Excellent Excellent summary of Henry Fords life and achievements. Will recommend for all age groups, more for young people. Loved reading it

  19. 5 out of 5

    Star Gater

    Like Jimi Hendrix, Hourly History nailed Henry Ford. Love the details, the myth vs fact addressed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ronda Wian

    An unique american. Just the impact on American culture .changed America forever. History that will never be seen again from a product and how to make it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Khaled

    Nice short summary Condensed into more of an article size,this short history on Ford was a nice quick read. I used this as a plug to my 2018 book target:)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeramie J Curtice

  23. 5 out of 5

    ROSE MARIYA MATHAI

  24. 5 out of 5

    DEBrianKelley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul Marriott

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lenin

  27. 4 out of 5

    RAJ

  28. 5 out of 5

    didier

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tim Mathews

  30. 4 out of 5

    Priya Agrawal

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