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Children of Amarid

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Tobyn-Ser is a gentle, bounteous land of small villages and close-knit communities, of dark woods and swift-running streams, of broad plains and clear lakes. But its idyllic peace is being disturbed by terrible rumors of mages seen committing horrible, violent acts, destroying crops, burning villages to the ground, and murdering innocents. The rumors even say that Theron m Tobyn-Ser is a gentle, bounteous land of small villages and close-knit communities, of dark woods and swift-running streams, of broad plains and clear lakes. But its idyllic peace is being disturbed by terrible rumors of mages seen committing horrible, violent acts, destroying crops, burning villages to the ground, and murdering innocents. The rumors even say that Theron may have returned from beyond death. But the truth is even worse: there is a traitor among the Children of Amarid, one who threatens not only to disrupt the Order but to destroy all of Tobyn-Ser, using strange, foreign powers that are beyond everyone's wildest imagination.


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Tobyn-Ser is a gentle, bounteous land of small villages and close-knit communities, of dark woods and swift-running streams, of broad plains and clear lakes. But its idyllic peace is being disturbed by terrible rumors of mages seen committing horrible, violent acts, destroying crops, burning villages to the ground, and murdering innocents. The rumors even say that Theron m Tobyn-Ser is a gentle, bounteous land of small villages and close-knit communities, of dark woods and swift-running streams, of broad plains and clear lakes. But its idyllic peace is being disturbed by terrible rumors of mages seen committing horrible, violent acts, destroying crops, burning villages to the ground, and murdering innocents. The rumors even say that Theron may have returned from beyond death. But the truth is even worse: there is a traitor among the Children of Amarid, one who threatens not only to disrupt the Order but to destroy all of Tobyn-Ser, using strange, foreign powers that are beyond everyone's wildest imagination.

30 review for Children of Amarid

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    The CoA is Coe's first novel and it shows-- both promise and freshman type errors. CoA is set in Tobyn-Ser-- a continent surrounded by two hostile neighbors-- Lon-Ser and Abboris. While lacking a formalized government, Tobyn-Ser has been protected from invasion and other ills by the 'Children of Amarid', a group of mages bound to various birds and such. Our main protagonist is something of a 'golden boy' (if the trope fits...) named Jaryd, and the novel starts off with his uncle (also a mage) sh The CoA is Coe's first novel and it shows-- both promise and freshman type errors. CoA is set in Tobyn-Ser-- a continent surrounded by two hostile neighbors-- Lon-Ser and Abboris. While lacking a formalized government, Tobyn-Ser has been protected from invasion and other ills by the 'Children of Amarid', a group of mages bound to various birds and such. Our main protagonist is something of a 'golden boy' (if the trope fits...) named Jaryd, and the novel starts off with his uncle (also a mage) showing up for his 18th birthday and asking if he would like to join the Children of Amarid; it seems his uncle detected his 'mage ability' early on, but wanted to wait until he was of age to make his choice. We also become aware early on of 'rogue mages' causing all kinds of mischief in the Tobyn-Ser, from arson to outright murder. The people who for so long trusted the Children of Amarid now show fear and worry and worse, the Children of Amarid themselves have no idea of what is going on, or who the 'rogue mages' are. This becomes apparent in Jaryd and his uncle's trip to the 'capitol' of Tobyn-Ser, a town that grew up around the house of the first mage in Tobyn-Ser, Amarid. Amarid and one other discovered mage powers and went on to create the Children of Amarid to protect the land (Amarid had a rather severe falling out with the co-founder, who wanted to use mage powers to become dictators or something). Who are these rogue mages? It turns out (mild spoiler) that they come from another continent with the aim to provoke mistrust among the people for the Children of Amarid; why? What do they want? These are the questions that Coe does not address until the very end of the novel. Anyway, after a tense meeting (called a gathering) at Amarid, a delegation of mages set out to find the spirit of the co-founder of the order, who died 'unbound'. Those mages who die without having an animal familiar are doomed to walk the land in spirit form due to an ancient curse. Intrigue infuses the novel as well, as some mages strongly suspect that there is a traitor among them working with the 'rogue mages'. Yet, it is not the 'typical' intrigue regarding who will be king or whatever; more like a mystery novel. Overall, a decent first book that won some awards back in the day. The main problems I had with the book concerned Coe's at times long winded info dumps in the guise of stories and his repeated narration of the same event from multiple POVs-- some of this needed to hit the editing floor, but so be it. Interesting tale and I am looking forward to the sequel. 2.5 stars, rounding up due to the ending cliffhanger.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Palmatier

    This is the first book by David B. Coe that I've read (and it's his debut novel). I'm not sure why I never got around to buying this at first, since I distinctly remember seeing it on the shelf and being interested, but it took a long time before I actually purchased it. I should have started it sooner. The main strengths of the writing are the characterization and the worldbuilding. Coe has created a group of characters and presented these world in such a way that you are drawn in and care about This is the first book by David B. Coe that I've read (and it's his debut novel). I'm not sure why I never got around to buying this at first, since I distinctly remember seeing it on the shelf and being interested, but it took a long time before I actually purchased it. I should have started it sooner. The main strengths of the writing are the characterization and the worldbuilding. Coe has created a group of characters and presented these world in such a way that you are drawn in and care about them and the world and want to find out what happens to them. I liked Jaryd and Baden and the rest, and the story and world was interesting enough to keep me reading. But I also had a few issues with the writing. It's rather dense, meaning that there are lots of long paragraphs and descriptions and such. While I don't really mind dense work, what was usually covered in these dense parts were long interior monologues of the current viewpoint character--the reasoning behind what they were doing, or an argument they were having with themselves, or in some instances a long "recollection" of a story of their past or whatever that perhaps gave some motivation for their current line of thought or an upcoming decision. That's what I didn't like. I thought that most of this interior dialogue could have been cut or expressed in a much faster fashion, and I thought it was often repetitive. Something else that bothered me a little (but not much) was that the magic system used the idea of a "familiar," typically a bird, but I didn't feel like the familiar was used to its greatest effect in the course of the story. They were there, they were used occasionally, but they could have been used MORE and the bond between mage and familiar could have been developed more to make the loss of a familiar stronger. However, having said that, I do think the book was strong and I intend to read the rest of the series as well as future Coe books. Part of me is hoping that the long dense paragraphs is simply a product of this being a debut novel and Coe will learn to shorten them or find another way to get these ideas across, but even if it is instead part of Coe's style I'll still continue to read his works. I'd definitely recommend the books to everyone who enjoys a good fat fantasy. *grin*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Morris

    Edited 10/06/2014 5:16pm After reading and rereading this book a few times, I have come to the conclusion that this book was very well done, at least in terms of construction and plot lines. There are several things in the book that I have noticed that struck me as odd or as incomplete, so if you shall allow me to share this with you guys. All of the construction of the mage craft was good, however, more time could have been spent on describing how well the owl or hawk bonds with the mage. Instead Edited 10/06/2014 5:16pm After reading and rereading this book a few times, I have come to the conclusion that this book was very well done, at least in terms of construction and plot lines. There are several things in the book that I have noticed that struck me as odd or as incomplete, so if you shall allow me to share this with you guys. All of the construction of the mage craft was good, however, more time could have been spent on describing how well the owl or hawk bonds with the mage. Instead of focusing so much on the backline storyline of the book, which was indeed hard to follow up with, but seeing as it's the first book in the series, I let it slide a little. Descriptions could have been a little more, condensed. It is set in the fantasy world, however, the author could have taken more of his time and our time describing more important views on the book or split the lengthy descriptions. The romance in the book. What more can I say? The boy always gets the girl. I am somewhat unhappy with every fantasy author's choice to make them get their dream girl. They should have some obstacle. Plus, falling in love is never that easy. With that being said, I did give this book a 4 star out of a 5. Why? Because I thoroughly enjoyed the content. It let me pick up the book more than twice and read it again and again, even if it means skimming through the more boring pages. Can't wait to read the second of this series!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    The people of Tobyn-Ser have a long history of trusting and relying upon the benevolent actions of an order of mages known as the Children of Amarid. But now, this trust is rapidly eroding as crops are destroyed, villages are burned, and innocent people are being killed, seemingly at the hands of these same mages. Are these renegade mages at work or is it something more dire? A young man named Jaryd, newly recognized as a mage, finds himself at the center of the effort to unmask the nature of th The people of Tobyn-Ser have a long history of trusting and relying upon the benevolent actions of an order of mages known as the Children of Amarid. But now, this trust is rapidly eroding as crops are destroyed, villages are burned, and innocent people are being killed, seemingly at the hands of these same mages. Are these renegade mages at work or is it something more dire? A young man named Jaryd, newly recognized as a mage, finds himself at the center of the effort to unmask the nature of the evil invading their lands. I was introduced to the works of author David Coe through his Thieftaker novels and stories, written under the name D.B. Jackson. I liked them so much that I’ve wanted to go back and try his more traditional fantasy and I’m very happy I did. This book is actually his very first published novel and is the first part of the “Lon Tobyn” trilogy. I found it to be an excellent read with vivid characters and an interesting plot. The world building is nice, as is the magic system. It is not without the sort of flaws that one might expect from a first novel, however. For example, I thought it could have used a bit more focus in some areas and occasionally the plot was uneven and meandered a little too much. There was also quite a bit of background presented in fairly large info dumps, but this was handled in clever ways such as through a story from somebody or a lesson for Jaryd, allowing us to learn about some of the history right along with him. But these are nitpicky issues, far outweighed by the sheer fun of reading a traditional fantasy novel filled with as much hopefulness as peril. It’s not “grimdark” fantasy or hard-boiled; you’ll find no f-bombs here. In style it resembles Raymond Feist’s “Riftwar” series. I like almost all kinds of fantasy and relish variety so have no problems with grimdark, etc. But it is nice every once in a while, to read a smooth-flowing fantasy yarn that doesn’t leave you with a feeling of dread. So, I offer my strongest compliment I can ever give a book in a series: I can’t wait to read the next one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Luiken

    Cool magic and an interesting world, but the pacing was too slow for my taste, with lots of travelling and description. At the beginning it felt like Jaryd would be our central character, but by the end it felt like Baden had taken over a bit. The author's first novel. Cool magic and an interesting world, but the pacing was too slow for my taste, with lots of travelling and description. At the beginning it felt like Jaryd would be our central character, but by the end it felt like Baden had taken over a bit. The author's first novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I thought that this was a great book, and Coe is probably my favorite author between these and the Winds of the Forelands and Blood of the Southlands collections. As I did with Coe's other series, I'm going to provide my review of the entire series here. I greatly enjoyed this series, with very few objections. I thought that the predictions of Jaryd and Alanna's strength was overwrought what with the foreshadowing already present in Amarid's Hawk, and that the plot tended to become just a bit pre I thought that this was a great book, and Coe is probably my favorite author between these and the Winds of the Forelands and Blood of the Southlands collections. As I did with Coe's other series, I'm going to provide my review of the entire series here. I greatly enjoyed this series, with very few objections. I thought that the predictions of Jaryd and Alanna's strength was overwrought what with the foreshadowing already present in Amarid's Hawk, and that the plot tended to become just a bit predictable, but I thought that the ancillary characters were well drawn out and in depth, with some of them being the best in the series, including the main antagonist (I won't put a name on the antagonist, to avoid spoilers, haha). Baden was probably my favorite character in the series, being one of the more complicated and imaginative mentor characters that you might see in other fantasy collections. I do wish that Coe had added the same type of intrigue in this series as he had in his other ones, but it was a great effort, and the series actually progressed quite well, with the third and final book of the trilogy being my favorite. The second book did slow the pace a bit, but not in a dragging way, and with necessary plot points, and it's own share of action. The first book was quick paced, gave great in-depth character profiles, and set the scene beautifully. Definately a good read if you're a fan of Coe, but not as good as his Winds of the Foreland series (then again, very little can possibly be better than that series, haha).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fatbaldguy60

    I enjoyed this one. I will be picking up the other two in this trilogy. There was some sense that the two new mages were a bit more powerful than was probably realistic. However, upon reflection, they did not really do major magics, but the visions people had of them being very powerful later were slightly offputting. I liked the magic system and would have liked more explication about the reasons owl masters are more powerful than hawk mages, and some more background on eagle mages. In addition, I enjoyed this one. I will be picking up the other two in this trilogy. There was some sense that the two new mages were a bit more powerful than was probably realistic. However, upon reflection, they did not really do major magics, but the visions people had of them being very powerful later were slightly offputting. I liked the magic system and would have liked more explication about the reasons owl masters are more powerful than hawk mages, and some more background on eagle mages. In addition, one of the powerful old mages was bound to a wolf, but in the thousand year history of the Order, no one else bound to another animal? At first the writing around the bad guy's identity, and later confusion about different suspects turned me off, but Coe kept it reasonably short and revealed things in good time. Good stuff.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen Ash

    Epic fantasy at its best! Coe captures a world and its history in this fast-moving, magical adventure. Ride with Jaryd as he travels the world of Tobyn-Ser, coming to terms with his powers and the plight of the land under the oppression of mages destroying crops and laying waste to villages. Jaryd's ready to start training the moment he leaves his family, but the trail is a difficult one and one thing after another gets in the way. Coe keeps us wrapped in the story of the present, the history of Epic fantasy at its best! Coe captures a world and its history in this fast-moving, magical adventure. Ride with Jaryd as he travels the world of Tobyn-Ser, coming to terms with his powers and the plight of the land under the oppression of mages destroying crops and laying waste to villages. Jaryd's ready to start training the moment he leaves his family, but the trail is a difficult one and one thing after another gets in the way. Coe keeps us wrapped in the story of the present, the history of the past and the prophecy of the future as the Children of Amarid fight to save the land and their way. Jaryd just wants to survive another day.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Neubert

    I don't know if I like this book or not. I liked: Character development,the idea of Hawk and Owl-Mages and the binding with birds, Alayna's conflict with doubt, betrayal and finding love, the setting of the story. I didn't like: long drawn out descriptions, repeated scenearios viewed from different point of views, modern weapon technology in an old magical story, the ending of the outlanders through a ....(I don't want to spoil the story). In the end I skipped over the last fifty pages because I lo I don't know if I like this book or not. I liked: Character development,the idea of Hawk and Owl-Mages and the binding with birds, Alayna's conflict with doubt, betrayal and finding love, the setting of the story. I didn't like: long drawn out descriptions, repeated scenearios viewed from different point of views, modern weapon technology in an old magical story, the ending of the outlanders through a ....(I don't want to spoil the story). In the end I skipped over the last fifty pages because I lost interest.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dia

    This book was awesome. A friend of mine lent it to me because we discovered our mutual love of fantasy books. Really the only thing that could have made this book better would be dragons. Instead, I got a greater appreciation for birds. The ending would have been disappointing except I know there is a second book and it is available for me to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    T J

    This is the story of Jayrd, a young man from Tobyn-Sir, finds that his nightmares are more than dreams. In a land of magic and the Order of Hawk and Owl-mages, we find that something deadly has come to destroy the peace the land has seen for centuries. This was an exciting read with many twist and turns. Looking forward to the next book The Outlanders.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This was the first book of his that I ever read, and it instantly earned my obsession into his other works. I have much admiration for his ability to build love for characters, and then kill them off unremorsefully.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Such a disappointment compared to his achievement with The Winds of the Forelands. Although Coe still shows himself to be an imaginative mastermind, the plot and characters just did not grab me like the Forelands series did.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Malik Strong

    This was the first book I read by David. My mother gave it to me to read, and from there I was on my way to an awesome journey of fantasy. It wasn't until years later that I found out it was a series. This is a must read! This was the first book I read by David. My mother gave it to me to read, and from there I was on my way to an awesome journey of fantasy. It wasn't until years later that I found out it was a series. This is a must read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Minouschka

    One of the first books fantasy books I ever bought. what an amazing book. In our bookstores there was already Harry Potter but all I could think of was to buy this book instead.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peter Smith

    Nice light easy reading page turner! I like the intricate heavy plotted fantasies too, but sometimes you need a nice good vs evil page turner and this definitely doesn't disappoint. Nice light easy reading page turner! I like the intricate heavy plotted fantasies too, but sometimes you need a nice good vs evil page turner and this definitely doesn't disappoint.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arne

    Great Book, nice start of the series

  18. 4 out of 5

    Will

    Despite the fact that it took me over two weeks to finish, the Children of Amarid (CoA) was actually quite a good read. Written in the classic fantasy style of good vs. evil (or so I thought, at first), the first LonTobyn Chronicle takes several things for granted. 1. The use of magic by mages is pretty much instinctive. Unlike some of the more recent novels that try to redefine the magic system, explaining it away in different and unique ways, CoA pretty much uses what you remember as magic. Th Despite the fact that it took me over two weeks to finish, the Children of Amarid (CoA) was actually quite a good read. Written in the classic fantasy style of good vs. evil (or so I thought, at first), the first LonTobyn Chronicle takes several things for granted. 1. The use of magic by mages is pretty much instinctive. Unlike some of the more recent novels that try to redefine the magic system, explaining it away in different and unique ways, CoA pretty much uses what you remember as magic. There's healing, blasts of fire, and energy shields. In this universe familiars--usually birds--are the conduit by which mages control and wield their magic. But nothing else is terribly inventive. It's maybe a little boring, a little to grey and within-the-lines, but otherwise perfectly fine. Another aspect of this comment is that there really wasn't anything in the way of formal training. The protagonist, Jaryd, received minimal training for and in bonding with his familiar, and then he could do magic. Almost by, well, magic. So I guess it was instinctive, and that anyone with the access could achieve it easily. 2. We are good, they are evil This was really taken for granted in the beginning of the book, but waned towards the end when we found out more about the enemy. Though the adversary depicted in this book were your typical cut-and-dry evil doers, I'm hopeful the second book will depict them as more human. But for this one, they were evil, and that's all you should think about it. There were really no shades of grey involved. 3. Overwhelming description is norm The early books of the Wheel of Time are among some of my favorites due to Oliver Rigney (Robert Jordan) 's exhaustive description of the world around him. Everything down to the last detail was written in, helping paint a pristine word-picture of the entire land. David B. Coe's attempt at exhaustive was decent, though his attempt for description fell short. I realize this is a revised edition, but I haven't read the first edition of the book. Maybe it was worse. In this edition however, there were times when I felt my eyes glossing over certain paragraphs where two of the main characters fell in love virtually at first sight, and felt the need to keep blathering on and on about it, reiterating each point again and again and again. 4. Fantasy is good. Sometimes an old-school fantasy is just what the soul needs. This was no exception. While far from the best fantasy I've ever read, this was an enjoying adventure that I by no means regret taking. I read a lot of Fantasy, because, well... fantasy is good. Despite my complaints about how the CoA did nothing to redefine the genre, sometimes trying overly hard ruins the story. And the story IS the important part. Maybe this review was a bit rambling. I suppose I won't post it to my blog until I've retooled it a bit. Maybe like the Children of Amarid, I'll have it out in another thirty or so years.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Munday

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A lot of words for a little adventure. There is basically 3 parts; The introduction to the order, The journey and The trial. The introduction introduces us to the order through the eyes of a young recruit named Jared. The journey is when all the action occurs. The trail is flawed and predictable. If the 3 bad guys (who had already killed 2 members of the party) had the last good guy in their clutches, why would they patch him up and send on his way home to testify against them? Just kill him and n A lot of words for a little adventure. There is basically 3 parts; The introduction to the order, The journey and The trial. The introduction introduces us to the order through the eyes of a young recruit named Jared. The journey is when all the action occurs. The trail is flawed and predictable. If the 3 bad guys (who had already killed 2 members of the party) had the last good guy in their clutches, why would they patch him up and send on his way home to testify against them? Just kill him and no-one is the wiser. Instead the author leads us through an elaborate defence and counter-argument between the single bad guy and the many good guys who are telling the truth. Not a bad read. There is not a lot of originality and the familiar's are not explained (why hawks and owls and wolves?). There is closure which is good, because I don't think I'll be looking the continue the series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I know a guy who has this thing for world development, Mike Healy if you are reading this, Mr Coe here is able to world develop. Not sure i was pleased with how fast Jaryd was accepted as a mage though, i might have to agree with Orris, just because you bind to your familiar does not make one a full mage. There should have been at least a few more lessons :) Im just about finished the trilogy now. Looking forward to his next one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan Ragsdale

    It’s been a l-o-o-n-g time since I’ve read a book where I actually slowed down my reading toward the end. I didn’t want anything bad to happen to the characters, and there was a definite confrontation looming. That’s what had me slow down my speed reading. I was that hooked by the band of adventurers trying to save the world. David Coe is masterful in his storytelling. The characters are endearing. The story solid, and his style is refreshing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A good start to a series with lots of promise. You can see the author's influences as you read but nothing felt fully from somewhere else. The main characters age feels really fluid and at times a child and others an adult but never truly either and doesn't really come across as a middle ground. With that being said the romantic interest felt weird when it went sexual and felt added to again tick another adult box but it felt too soon after ticking a child box to make it weird. A good start to a series with lots of promise. You can see the author's influences as you read but nothing felt fully from somewhere else. The main characters age feels really fluid and at times a child and others an adult but never truly either and doesn't really come across as a middle ground. With that being said the romantic interest felt weird when it went sexual and felt added to again tick another adult box but it felt too soon after ticking a child box to make it weird.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    One of my favorites. I read this for the first time almost 20 years ago. Loved it then and loved it now. Would really like the author to revisit this world and write a new story for it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    NiteHaze

    The plot is actually really interesting and I really liked the world building. My biggest problem with the book is how unnaturally fast some relationships develop I just can't grasp people knowing each other for like 3 months and already planning to live the rest of their lives together. The plot is actually really interesting and I really liked the world building. My biggest problem with the book is how unnaturally fast some relationships develop I just can't grasp people knowing each other for like 3 months and already planning to live the rest of their lives together.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Logan Horsford

    Gave up once, had nothing else to read, made another attempt - gave it up as well after 6 hours in. This is just painfully slow. World was mildly interesting but the pacing just wore me down. DNF.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Stopped at 25%. Eh, it's just not grabbing me. I don't really care about the characters the overall premise is something I've read many times before. With how many books I want to read, I just don't want to waste time finishing this one. Stopped at 25%. Eh, it's just not grabbing me. I don't really care about the characters the overall premise is something I've read many times before. With how many books I want to read, I just don't want to waste time finishing this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anna Westerbeek

    It was a fun book to read. In the end I found it hard to read further, because it was all a bit too stretched and detailed. Or maybe I was feeling the pressure of wanting to read how it ends and I couldn't read fast enough 🤔😉. It was a fun book to read. In the end I found it hard to read further, because it was all a bit too stretched and detailed. Or maybe I was feeling the pressure of wanting to read how it ends and I couldn't read fast enough 🤔😉.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tony Genova

    The best book ever This is the first fantasy novel that I read as a young adult and I have read this book more often than any other. It was so refreshing to reread it after the revisions. I only wish that there were more than 3 books. (Maybe an Amarid and Theron prequel)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brent Moffitt

    Interesting, but not exactly spell-binding. I will read the other two in the series since I read this one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Good story. Slow beginning. It got pretty decent by the end. =)

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