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But Some of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women's Studies

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This ground-breaking collection provides hours of enjoyment for the general reader and a wealth of materials needed to develop course units on black women; political theory, literary essays on major writers, guidelines for consciousness-raising about racism, and surveys of black women's contributions to the blues. "Important and innovative."--Feminist Bookstore News This ground-breaking collection provides hours of enjoyment for the general reader and a wealth of materials needed to develop course units on black women; political theory, literary essays on major writers, guidelines for consciousness-raising about racism, and surveys of black women's contributions to the blues. "Important and innovative."--Feminist Bookstore News


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This ground-breaking collection provides hours of enjoyment for the general reader and a wealth of materials needed to develop course units on black women; political theory, literary essays on major writers, guidelines for consciousness-raising about racism, and surveys of black women's contributions to the blues. "Important and innovative."--Feminist Bookstore News This ground-breaking collection provides hours of enjoyment for the general reader and a wealth of materials needed to develop course units on black women; political theory, literary essays on major writers, guidelines for consciousness-raising about racism, and surveys of black women's contributions to the blues. "Important and innovative."--Feminist Bookstore News

30 review for But Some of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women's Studies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tressie Mcphd

    I have a complicated history with feminism that is probably not unique for a post-civil rights/black power movement black woman. But, all issues with the word feminism aside, I recognized myself too much in these essays to deny that whether I like it or not, I am constantly inhabiting multiple worlds. If the black man's plight is double-consciousness the black woman's must be a quad-consciousness. Michele Wallace's essay could well be my life save the 15 pounds she actually lost. She ends her es I have a complicated history with feminism that is probably not unique for a post-civil rights/black power movement black woman. But, all issues with the word feminism aside, I recognized myself too much in these essays to deny that whether I like it or not, I am constantly inhabiting multiple worlds. If the black man's plight is double-consciousness the black woman's must be a quad-consciousness. Michele Wallace's essay could well be my life save the 15 pounds she actually lost. She ends her essay saying there is little hope for a black feminist movement and maybe some minimal hope for a multicultural feminist movement. The sociologist (and black woman) in me tends to agree. This appears to be an individual fight -- I'd argue primarily due to mate competition but again, I'm a sociologist. It's one of those perma-books: on my shelf, moves with me, re-read from time to time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Craig Cunningham

    This book exemplifies the early specifc work done in the area of African American feminism. I loved the book, and have often had the opportunity to read it over and over again. Also, looking at this text as a required reading in my African American History Class. Superb!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Slaughter

    I've had this book for years but ever so often I revisit it. I'm always inspired and amazed when I do. Essential reading for men and women of all backgrounds. I've had this book for years but ever so often I revisit it. I'm always inspired and amazed when I do. Essential reading for men and women of all backgrounds.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ernest Sneed

    This is the text that is the foundation for the creation of black feminist studies in the university setting. The book gives a framework to understand the impact of races, sex, and class status on the African American woman. This book is a very important historical document and political statement for African American women and an understanding of the importance of the "examined life" for black women. This is the text that is the foundation for the creation of black feminist studies in the university setting. The book gives a framework to understand the impact of races, sex, and class status on the African American woman. This book is a very important historical document and political statement for African American women and an understanding of the importance of the "examined life" for black women.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shuli

    But Some Of Us Are Brave is a wonderful introduction to Black feminist history. I've read a number of anthologies of Black feminist theory which skim over the earlier history of a Black women's feminism in the backdrop of the movements 50s and 60s. Maybe with a few notes or an essay you'll be introduced to the origins of the school of thought but because Black feminism covers such a wide-range, I often read anthologies that are focused much more heavily on the work of later scholars. What I appre But Some Of Us Are Brave is a wonderful introduction to Black feminist history. I've read a number of anthologies of Black feminist theory which skim over the earlier history of a Black women's feminism in the backdrop of the movements 50s and 60s. Maybe with a few notes or an essay you'll be introduced to the origins of the school of thought but because Black feminism covers such a wide-range, I often read anthologies that are focused much more heavily on the work of later scholars. What I appreciate about Akasha Gloria Hull's anthology is the historical focus. It was first published in 1982 (the second edition was in 2016) and many of the essays focus on earlier organizing experiences or on study of pre-1960s Black women's history/culture. The sections, "Searching for Sisterhood: Black Feminism" and "Creative Survival: Preserving Mind, Body, and Spirit" were the most enlightening for me and help contextualize many of the conversations being had in feminism today, but I also enjoyed combing over the bibliographies and suggested syllabi offered, many of the books/articles listed are works that have been largely forgotten over the past decades and deserve renewed attention.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andi

    Amazing. These women wrote stuff that is still so relevant today, brilliantly tackling the intersection of racism and sexism and the unique experiences black women live in our society. There are a lot of different essays with very strong voices analyzing every angle. Must read. Absolutely phenomenal.

  7. 4 out of 5

    jewelthinks

    The section on black women writers phenomenal. I was enjoying this section so much that I slowed down my reading to savor the essays. Bottom line: GET THIS BOOK NOW!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Camilla Lyons

    Even thought, I just started to read it. I find the book very in depth with our issues of yesterday and today. I think this book should be on every black woman and men shelves.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shamira

    A must read book for anyone seeking to engage seriously and critically in the Black feminist space.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    An interesting portrait of the moment when black women's studies was beginning to come into its own...a great book for understanding the historiography of the field in the mid-1980s. An interesting portrait of the moment when black women's studies was beginning to come into its own...a great book for understanding the historiography of the field in the mid-1980s.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Massielita

    So many of the points of view expressed in the essays in this book are still applicable and accurate today. Specifically that feminism needs to be intersectional.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Atikah Wahid

    If you want to read about Black Feminism or even just the racial and gender politics of 70s and 80s America, then this is worth a read. To say that this is a pioneering book of a field that is not even popular today is an understatement. What amazes me about these black female scholars within this book are the incredible obstacles in their way: they not only had to build this entire field from the ground up but they had to do so while going against white feminism, sexism within African American If you want to read about Black Feminism or even just the racial and gender politics of 70s and 80s America, then this is worth a read. To say that this is a pioneering book of a field that is not even popular today is an understatement. What amazes me about these black female scholars within this book are the incredible obstacles in their way: they not only had to build this entire field from the ground up but they had to do so while going against white feminism, sexism within African American community itself, and good ol' white patriarchy. Guns blazing, this book is not shy in giving hard-hitting truths. This book aimed to be intersectional when they didn't even have the term for it at the time. This book is a collection of various essays tackling issues such as unity among black women, racism and sexism that hinder black women within academia, a need to uplift black women's voices especially in literature and many more. A lot of the contributors in this book have since become key figures in the field such as Alice Walker, Michele Wallace, Barbara Smith, and Jean Fagan Yellin. The language is not too difficult, as in it doesn't rely on academic jargon too much, so even a casual reader with an immense interest in this topic could enjoy it. However, there is a downside to being a pioneer. Mainly that the way this book tackles certain topics is done in a very bare bones sort of way because nobody else has written about them yet. For example, Smith's article "Toward a Black Feminist Criticism" is more of a call to action to develop black feminist criticism rather than a clear or in depth explanation of its framework. That will come much later in the future. So, if you're a 21st century reader like me who's hoping to understand more of the concrete concepts in black feminism, this might not be the best foundation as the field has yet to come together during the writing of this book. There are also some outdated terms and facts such as "Third World women" and the fact that Lydia Maria Child is still credited as the author for "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" instead of Harriet Jacobs. There is also a huge section of the book that is merely bibliography for further reading on certain topics. So, this book is not a cover-to-cover read. I'm sure that section is a godsend back in the day but we have the Internet now and I'm not even sure if these books are still available or relevant. I still think this book can play a role in giving context on how black feminism first came to be and its main goals and visions. I think this book is a great supplement if you want to have a holistic approach in understanding black feminism. It's also pretty amazing to read the ideas that these scholars had back then that we are still grappling today!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    This is a really important book, but not always easy reading. There are some wonderful essays, especially Alice Walker's "A Child of One's Own". In the process of supporting the study of intersectionality before the term even existed, though, there are pieces like bibliographies and course syllabi, and reading over them can drag. That being said, some of those bibliographies in their descriptions really give an idea of the work that was necessary, and in how rewarding it could be. This was espec This is a really important book, but not always easy reading. There are some wonderful essays, especially Alice Walker's "A Child of One's Own". In the process of supporting the study of intersectionality before the term even existed, though, there are pieces like bibliographies and course syllabi, and reading over them can drag. That being said, some of those bibliographies in their descriptions really give an idea of the work that was necessary, and in how rewarding it could be. This was especially true of Martha H. Brown's listing of non-print materials, work on locating composers, and Gloria T Hull's account of researching Alice Dunbar Nelson. I don't generally love reading electronic versions, but I admit to being glad I have this one electronically and can keep it. Even though going over those bibliographies did drag, I feel like they are going to be very valuable resources going forward.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sruti

    Direct, deeply felt, and sorely needed. I skimmed through the bibliographies and course offerings, but the rest - the pieces underscoring the need for intersectional social movements and the "engaged" rather than the "objective" analysis of black women throughout history - made this a skillful work. Direct, deeply felt, and sorely needed. I skimmed through the bibliographies and course offerings, but the rest - the pieces underscoring the need for intersectional social movements and the "engaged" rather than the "objective" analysis of black women throughout history - made this a skillful work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    A lot of it is bibliographies and syllabi, advice for classwork and so on. Awesome for that purpose but not a text for a casual reader. I will definitely be using the bibliographies to find more books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ghadah Al_bariqi

    Black woman searching for her identity and proving her autonomy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Roebuck

    an excellent reflection of the gaps that occurred in the feminist movement between european american women and women of color

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cara Byrne

    An incredibly important collection framing Black women's studies and noting the many unrecognized contributions of Black women in America during the last four hundred years. An incredibly important collection framing Black women's studies and noting the many unrecognized contributions of Black women in America during the last four hundred years.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BMR, LCSW

    This was my first read on a Kindle. I need to get it in print because there is so much to save and reread.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    305.48896 A4167 2015

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    A critical book for anyone interested in the subject to read, but particularly for the vision and calls to action that were written in the early 1980s and *still* many of which are a struggle to implement, which they should not be. Fantastic resource

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul Brooks

    Absolutely wonderful and insightful book of articles on the sentiments of black women. And although the book itself is fantastic, simply a meditation on the title near the brings me to tears. "All the women are white, all the blacks are men, but some of us are brave". Absolutely wonderful and insightful book of articles on the sentiments of black women. And although the book itself is fantastic, simply a meditation on the title near the brings me to tears. "All the women are white, all the blacks are men, but some of us are brave".

  23. 4 out of 5

    Skincare For Introverts

    An indispensable resource - part essay collection, bibliography/archive, syllabus full of incredible academic work done on Black women's studies. An indispensable resource - part essay collection, bibliography/archive, syllabus full of incredible academic work done on Black women's studies.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kab

    3.5

  25. 5 out of 5

    Doris Raines

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  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    Every single Black woman needs to have this in her library.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katharina

    I love this thread! I am always so worried about spoiling the book that my reviews are usually just a few sentences and basically pointless

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sisney

    I didn’t read the last part of this book because it consists of course syllabi and clearly outdated bibliographies (it was published in 1982). However, I enjoyed many of the essays. Michele Wallace’s discussion of her years as an undergraduate “searching for sisterhood” and Alice Walker’s memories of being a young mother teaching a new course in black women writers at Wellesley were especially interesting. But my favorite essay was Michele Russell’s “Slave Codes and Liner Notes,” which focused o I didn’t read the last part of this book because it consists of course syllabi and clearly outdated bibliographies (it was published in 1982). However, I enjoyed many of the essays. Michele Wallace’s discussion of her years as an undergraduate “searching for sisterhood” and Alice Walker’s memories of being a young mother teaching a new course in black women writers at Wellesley were especially interesting. But my favorite essay was Michele Russell’s “Slave Codes and Liner Notes,” which focused on such singers as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, and Nina Simone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cata

    Stellar commentary. Insightful for the time when it was originally published and still very a relevant reaction to mainstream middle class straight white feminism.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paula Roy

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