Hot Best Seller

Poems Are Teachers: How Studying Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres

Availability: Ready to download

"Poems wake us up, keep us company, and remind us that our world is big and small, And too, poems teach us how to write. Anything." Amy Ludwig VanDerwater explains in Poems Are Teachers. This is a practical book designed for every classroom teacher. Each lesson exploration includes three poems, one by a contemporary adult poet and two by students in grades 2 through 8, whi "Poems wake us up, keep us company, and remind us that our world is big and small, And too, poems teach us how to write. Anything." Amy Ludwig VanDerwater explains in Poems Are Teachers. This is a practical book designed for every classroom teacher. Each lesson exploration includes three poems, one by a contemporary adult poet and two by students in grades 2 through 8, which serve as models to illustrate how poetry teaches writers to: find ideas choose perspective and point of view structure texts play with language craft beginnings and endings choose titles. Students will learn how to replicate the craft techniques found in poetry to strengthen all writing, from fiction to opinion, from personal narrative to information. "Poets arrange words and phrases just as prose writers do, simply in tighter spaces," Amy argues. "In the tight space of poetry, readers can identify writing techniques after reading one page, not thirty pages."


Compare

"Poems wake us up, keep us company, and remind us that our world is big and small, And too, poems teach us how to write. Anything." Amy Ludwig VanDerwater explains in Poems Are Teachers. This is a practical book designed for every classroom teacher. Each lesson exploration includes three poems, one by a contemporary adult poet and two by students in grades 2 through 8, whi "Poems wake us up, keep us company, and remind us that our world is big and small, And too, poems teach us how to write. Anything." Amy Ludwig VanDerwater explains in Poems Are Teachers. This is a practical book designed for every classroom teacher. Each lesson exploration includes three poems, one by a contemporary adult poet and two by students in grades 2 through 8, which serve as models to illustrate how poetry teaches writers to: find ideas choose perspective and point of view structure texts play with language craft beginnings and endings choose titles. Students will learn how to replicate the craft techniques found in poetry to strengthen all writing, from fiction to opinion, from personal narrative to information. "Poets arrange words and phrases just as prose writers do, simply in tighter spaces," Amy argues. "In the tight space of poetry, readers can identify writing techniques after reading one page, not thirty pages."

30 review for Poems Are Teachers: How Studying Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Every writing teacher needs to read this book. Every writer needs to read this book. You will leave this book WANTING to write; WANTING to have a classroom full of students with whom to write. All that's good and right and true about writing in any other form is also good and right and true about writing poetry. There is so much to learn from poetry. There is so much to learn from Amy Ludwig VanDerwater. What are you waiting for?!? BEGIN! Every writing teacher needs to read this book. Every writer needs to read this book. You will leave this book WANTING to write; WANTING to have a classroom full of students with whom to write. All that's good and right and true about writing in any other form is also good and right and true about writing poetry. There is so much to learn from poetry. There is so much to learn from Amy Ludwig VanDerwater. What are you waiting for?!? BEGIN!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    I have been so excited for this book's release and when it arrived I devoured it. Amy Ludwig VanDerWater has been my "go-to" poet/teacher for years. Her website The Poem Farm http://www.poemfarm.amylv.com/ has helped me teach and think about poetry in new ways so I knew this book would be amazing--and it didn't disappoint. Each lesson offers us 3 poems as mentor texts (1 contemporary poet and 2 student poets) for learning about: craft, ideas, point of view, structure, titles and more. You do not I have been so excited for this book's release and when it arrived I devoured it. Amy Ludwig VanDerWater has been my "go-to" poet/teacher for years. Her website The Poem Farm http://www.poemfarm.amylv.com/ has helped me teach and think about poetry in new ways so I knew this book would be amazing--and it didn't disappoint. Each lesson offers us 3 poems as mentor texts (1 contemporary poet and 2 student poets) for learning about: craft, ideas, point of view, structure, titles and more. You do not have to read it cover to cover, just dive in and enjoy. Your teaching of poetry will be inspired and your appreciation for poetry will be enhanced. It's amazing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tara Brown

    If you are anything like me, you wonder numerous times throughout the school year: "How in the world am I ever going to find time to cover everything in the curriculum? How can I best teach the state and district standards, so I can confidently move forward knowing my students are prepared for what comes next? After spending so much time on (xx), why are my students still not grasping these ideas and concepts? How can I help my students understand complex ideas in a clear, meaningful, and applic If you are anything like me, you wonder numerous times throughout the school year: "How in the world am I ever going to find time to cover everything in the curriculum? How can I best teach the state and district standards, so I can confidently move forward knowing my students are prepared for what comes next? After spending so much time on (xx), why are my students still not grasping these ideas and concepts? How can I help my students understand complex ideas in a clear, meaningful, and applicable manner? How can I tap into my students' creative side? How can I keep them engaged and interested in what we are learning long enough to ensure growth in all these areas?" And on and on... Sound familiar? In our ever-changing world, the requirements and expectations of teachers and their students seem to increase by the day, causing overwhelm, doubt, and frustration in many of us. As a teacher, it's my responsibility to help my students reach success in many areas, but is there a way to do this without feeling like it really cannot be done? Yes, there is! This is my 20th year teaching high school Spanish and English Literature and Composition in an urban-setting, Title 1, district. Due to lack of funding, we do not have resources and materials available for classroom use that some of the surrounding districts might take for granted - books and access to technology are the first ones that come to mind. In addition, many of my students do not come from households that provide structure, support, and knowledge of the world on a global scale in the way some of us did as kids and the way the majority of those in surrounding districts do. Sometimes, this is a good thing because teaching them something new means they come to me with no preconceived notions, biases, or habits that need to be changed or unlearned regarding specific content, but, on the other hand, teaching to a "blank slate" means starting at the beginning (because prior knowledge doesn't always exist). That means the road ahead is very long. My biggest concern, however, is that my students' test scores (for example, the SAT) are measured on the same large scale as those who are much more prepared in certain areas, or have access to the resources and support mentioned above. So, again, "What can I do to level the playing field for my students? How, without textbooks or technology, can I expose my kids to the views of others (and the world)? What are some best practices in covering everything the state says kids in this grade should know by the end of the year? How can I create engaging, meaningful lessons (without continuing to spend my own life savings on additional resources and classroom materials), so that when my students leave my class, they are more prepared for the future?" The answer is one I never expected. The answer too all these questions is in Amy Ludwig Vanderwater's Poems are Teachers: How Studying Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres. Lucky for me, it only took 19 of my 20 years teaching to make this discovery, and I can now spend the next 20 years perfecting it. Lucky for you, I'm here to save you the time and worry as you continue to search for the answer. Stop searching - you have arrived at your destination! I've only been using the ideas in this A.M.A.Z.I.N.G. book for about three marking periods (two last school year and one this school year), but in that time I feel I have grown so much as an educator. The ideas, techniques, and suggested strategies for implementation have not only changed the way I teach, but they have also changed the way my students approach learning, absorb new ideas and concepts, and view themselves and others. This book has helped to motivate and inspire even the most reluctant learners, while sparking excitement and curiosity we never knew existed! It has helped advance my students' understanding of specific concepts, giving them confidence in their abilities as learners and writers. It also, miraculously, has freed up time in class we didn't have before, allowing me more 1:1 interaction with students, so I can better meet all their needs. I spend less time talking AT the kids and more time talking TO them; as their skills improve, they, too, are spending more time interacting WITH one another because they are realizing they have voices worth hearing and ideas worth sharing! For my students, this is huge! The techniques and strategies presented in the book Poems are Teachers (as well as the plethora of information, opportunities, and activites on the author's popular blog, The Poem Farm) can easily be implemented by teachers of all grade levels and subject areas. Yes, every single teacher in every single classroom of any subject area and/or grade level would benefit from having a copy of this book. Teachers can choose to use Poems are Teachers from cover to cover as a main structure for their lessons all year long, or they can use it as a companion or resource when putting together a unit or presenting specific ideas in their required curriculum. Perfectly organized and easy to follow, each section of this book focuses on helping writers improve their craft through the use of reading and studying poems - the structure, the language, and the techniques used by the many contemporary adult and child poets (mentor texts galore!!). In doing so, kids learn to recognize specific literary techniques commonly used and apply these learnings to their own writing of all kinds - same tool, different genre, as the intro of this book states, deepens students' understanding of specific techniques across genres and beyond specific assignments (making them more prepared for anything from basic reading comprehension to SAT tests and writing college essays). In addition to suggestions for implementation, teaching of each technique, and mentor texts, also included are words from the actual poets, themselves, about that specific technique and "Try it" activities to use in class. There are also ideas, places to look, and suggestions for extending our learning, a guide to the poets, a references section, and even personal tidbits of info and encouragement spread throughout by the author, herself. Without hesitation, Poems are Teachers: How Studying Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres by Amy Ludwig Vanderwater gets not only a very deserving a 5/5 star rating, but also my full recommendation to teachers everywhere. I am a better teacher because of what I have learned, and my students continue to grow as learners, writers, and individuals every single day. Classtime is now more enjoyable and exciting, and the road to success no longer seems so long. I truly believe I wouldn't be here today without the help and support provided within these pages, and I am confident that you, too, will feel the same. Your students deserve it, you deserve it, and this book is the first step in helping you both reach success! Thank you so much for reading and best wishes to all on your learning adventures! :-)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

    "I promise that you are about to experience joy reading this book. I am positive that sharing the poems, the how-tos, and the inner workings of all of these poets' hearts and minds with your students will magically, even miraculously improve their poetry and prose." (from Katherine Bomer's Introduction to POEMS ARE TEACHERS) Presented in six sections that model something that looks closer to what writers of prose do, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater's POEMS ARE TEACHERS: HOW STUDYING POETRY STRENGTHENS WRIT "I promise that you are about to experience joy reading this book. I am positive that sharing the poems, the how-tos, and the inner workings of all of these poets' hearts and minds with your students will magically, even miraculously improve their poetry and prose." (from Katherine Bomer's Introduction to POEMS ARE TEACHERS) Presented in six sections that model something that looks closer to what writers of prose do, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater's POEMS ARE TEACHERS: HOW STUDYING POETRY STRENGTHENS WRITING IN ALL OTHER GENRES arrives at the teacher's desk looking like a familiar guide to prose writing. These ARE the things that writers do. But have we considered. . .these steps and these moves are also the things that poets do? I wish that poetry units shared across the country were created more in line with National Poetry Month (and, in fairness, many are), but I sense that poetry units are often built into the scope and sequence of a pacing guide to which those who assess the guides nod appreciatively that the students probably should see some poetry during the course of the 180 days the student will spend in the classroom. And, then, the mantle is picked up by the English Language Arts teacher and dutifully carried forth as May and the coming summer break comes even closer. Older students probably think thoughts along the lines of "Okay; it's only four weeks. We've done this before and we have seen some poems in this book while were looking for other stories already this year." This is a most jaded way to look at poetry and it is not my typical view. I want to present this view, however, to present in contrast what Amy Ludwig VanDerwater is able to do in this Heinemann text from Fall 2017 (it hasn't even had its first birthday at the time of this review and I hope that its fall release means that it has become a spring resource for many of my teacher friends out there). Each section from the first, "Writers Find Ideas," follows a structure that makes each element one that is classroom, writer's workshop ready. Amy provides a bit of thought for the teacher in the room, one that the readers and the writers, in all likelihood, will not see. This is about centering the lead learner/reader/writer in the room to think and to reflect upon this "writerly move" that probably comes natural one who has written and successfully navigated coursework that invited and demanded writing. It is most appropriate that the book which promises strengthening of writing in other genres begins with how ideas are generated. And it is appropriate that this section of the book is one the longer sections of the book clocking in at fifty-five pages with no fewer than thirteen mentor poets providing samples their own poetry. Each poet presented within the book presents his or her poem followed an element called "Words from the Poet." These COULD be shared with the writers in the room as an example of reflection upon the poetry that has been written by the poet who has written it. Following "Words of the Poet" is an element called "Consider the Technique." Amy comes back as author of the resource to share more ideas about where to find inspiration or, at times, physical materials that could generate poetry. As the author considers the technique, recommendations for books which might further the poetic approach featured are offered in short lists for the teacher to reference. Consulting "Consider the Technique," the teacher can come back to the moves employed by the poet to create their own mini lesson or have a little more information on the means by which the poet wrote his or her poem to nudge the writers in the room for the next section (and one of my favorites from the book): "Try It." The "Try It" element of the book is an invitation to write poetry. These are quick invitations based now upon the mentor poem which featured the approach and the teacher's deepened or quickened appreciation for this style or approach. Each poem and following elements are followed by real examples of student writer's pieces which were a part of the planning for the book and coordinated with teachers in the classroom and their student writers. Each of the elements presented are set up in the manner described here and follow this arrangement: Writers Find Ideas Writers Choose Perspective and Point of View Writers Structure Text (one of my favorites as this addresses the rhetorical modes I must teach) Writers Play with Language Writers Craft Beginnings and Endings (super for student writers who often struggle with these) Writers Select Titles (as I tell my students, "You title everything from here on out.") There are six sections that could be compressed to fit the month of April, but there is enough material within POEMS ARE TEACHERS to provide the classroom teacher with poetry lessons that could carry writing instruction throughout the year. More, with the move toward PLCs, teachers could use ideas found within the book to model conversations with their colleagues about the generative nature of taking time to explore ideas and to render these ideas through the language of poetry. Amy Ludwig VanDerwater's book is a gift to those looking for resources to teach poetry which include approaches and techniques, reflections upon and connections to the goals of the writing classroom (in any content area) for its students, and mentor poets and their poems from "living poets" which serve as a sort of "sit next to you and write" resource.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Lobosco

    Fabulous book. Fabulous and delightful author. Easy to follow format to use poetry to teach writing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jama Mosher

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura Shovan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kay Mcgriff

  9. 4 out of 5

    William Lawrence

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy-Lynn

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Ferguson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ashley LaCroix

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette Fox

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah O'Dell

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dianne White

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debra

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Dischler

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aliza Werner

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mariya Ortiz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Shepherd

  30. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Abler

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...