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'Salem's Lot Signed Limited 40th Anniversary Edition

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EDITION Split into three novella-length standalone volumes each with specially commissioned jacket artwork, and housed in a special illustrated slipcase, limited to 974 copies signed by the artist with Stephen King's facsimile signature on the title page.. CONTENTS - Book 1 FOREWORD: 'Dracula Meets Peyton Place' by Neil Gaiman INTRODUCTION by Stephen King PART 1: THE MARST EDITION Split into three novella-length standalone volumes each with specially commissioned jacket artwork, and housed in a special illustrated slipcase, limited to 974 copies signed by the artist with Stephen King's facsimile signature on the title page.. CONTENTS - Book 1 FOREWORD: 'Dracula Meets Peyton Place' by Neil Gaiman INTRODUCTION by Stephen King PART 1: THE MARSTEN HOUSE CONTENTS - Book 2 PART 2: THE EMPEROR OF ICE CREAM CONTENTS - Book 3 PART 3: THE DESERTED ViLLAGE ONE FOR THE ROAD JERUSALEM'S LOT 'SALEM'S LOT: Deleted Scenes AFTERWORD by Stephen King


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EDITION Split into three novella-length standalone volumes each with specially commissioned jacket artwork, and housed in a special illustrated slipcase, limited to 974 copies signed by the artist with Stephen King's facsimile signature on the title page.. CONTENTS - Book 1 FOREWORD: 'Dracula Meets Peyton Place' by Neil Gaiman INTRODUCTION by Stephen King PART 1: THE MARST EDITION Split into three novella-length standalone volumes each with specially commissioned jacket artwork, and housed in a special illustrated slipcase, limited to 974 copies signed by the artist with Stephen King's facsimile signature on the title page.. CONTENTS - Book 1 FOREWORD: 'Dracula Meets Peyton Place' by Neil Gaiman INTRODUCTION by Stephen King PART 1: THE MARSTEN HOUSE CONTENTS - Book 2 PART 2: THE EMPEROR OF ICE CREAM CONTENTS - Book 3 PART 3: THE DESERTED ViLLAGE ONE FOR THE ROAD JERUSALEM'S LOT 'SALEM'S LOT: Deleted Scenes AFTERWORD by Stephen King

30 review for 'Salem's Lot Signed Limited 40th Anniversary Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “At three in the morning the blood runs slow and thick, and slumber is heavy. The soul either sleeps in blessed ignorance of such an hour or gazes about itself in utter despair. There is no middle ground.” Once again, I am left speechless by King. I am without speech. I think that when a period of times passes by wherein you haven’t read much classic King, you kinda forget what he is capable of. Rereading The Shining and ‘Salem’s Lot these past two months has really reinforced for me why King is “At three in the morning the blood runs slow and thick, and slumber is heavy. The soul either sleeps in blessed ignorance of such an hour or gazes about itself in utter despair. There is no middle ground.” Once again, I am left speechless by King. I am without speech. I think that when a period of times passes by wherein you haven’t read much classic King, you kinda forget what he is capable of. Rereading The Shining and ‘Salem’s Lot these past two months has really reinforced for me why King is the goddamn Master. No one writes a small town like King. The way he carefully crafts and builds a town and all its residents is incredible, and ‘Salem’s Lot is one of his best. To learn about and to become part of this small town, only to watch it disintegrate and fall victim to a dominant evil force, is one of the most addictive reading experiences! It’s a slow burner, but it really needs to be in order for King to gradually increase the dread and terror. October is the optimal time to read ‘Salem’s Lot, as it means you’ll pretty much be reading it in real time. The descriptions of autumn are some of my favourite pieces of King’s writing. He just nails it. He honestly just nails this entire book in my opinion. Prior to my reread I often thought of Ben and Susan in a negative light, like “oh Salem’s Lot is awesome, shame about some of the characters..” but this time around, I appreciate them more. Susan may be quite one-dimensional but I really admired the way she stood up to her mother at times. As for Ben, he isn’t the most exciting either, but he doesn’t shy away when the horrors unfold, he’s pretty badass. And Mark Petrie!! Still one of my favourite King child characters. He goes through so much, some of his sections really bring me the feels. And shout-out to Father Callahan, as well! And Jimmy... and Matt... the whole crew basically! I also had forgotten how chilling this book could be. Matt hearing someone upstairs... the childish giggle... the visitor at the window... the knives... I loved how spooked I felt at times! Truly a favourite King of mine. 5 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael || TheNeverendingTBR

    Don't know why this is marked as unread, I've read it four times. It's one of the best horror novels of all time. Don't know why this is marked as unread, I've read it four times. It's one of the best horror novels of all time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “At three in the morning the blood runs slow and thick, and slumber is heavy. The soul either sleeps in blessed ignorance of such an hour or gazes about itself in utter despair. There is no middle ground.” Once again, I am left speechless by King. I am without speech. I think that when a period of times passes by wherein you haven’t read much classic King, you kinda forget what he is capable of. Rereading The Shining and ‘Salem’s Lot these past two months has really reinforced for me why King is “At three in the morning the blood runs slow and thick, and slumber is heavy. The soul either sleeps in blessed ignorance of such an hour or gazes about itself in utter despair. There is no middle ground.” Once again, I am left speechless by King. I am without speech. I think that when a period of times passes by wherein you haven’t read much classic King, you kinda forget what he is capable of. Rereading The Shining and ‘Salem’s Lot these past two months has really reinforced for me why King is the goddamn Master. No one writes a small town like King. The way he carefully crafts and builds a town and all its residents is incredible, and ‘Salem’s Lot is one of his best. To learn about and to become part of this small town, only to watch it disintegrate and fall victim to a dominant evil force, is one of the most addictive reading experiences! It’s a slow burner, but it really needs to be in order for King to gradually increase the dread and terror. October is the optimal time to read ‘Salem’s Lot, as it means you’ll pretty much be reading it in real time. The descriptions of autumn are some of my favourite pieces of King’s writing. He just nails it. He honestly just nails this entire book in my opinion. Prior to my reread I often thought of Ben and Susan in a negative light, like “oh Salem’s Lot is awesome, shame about some of the characters..” but this time around, I appreciate them more. Susan may be quite one-dimensional but I really admired the way she stood up to her mother at times. As for Ben, he isn’t the most exciting either, but he doesn’t shy away when the horrors unfold, he’s pretty badass. And Mark Petrie!! Still one of my favourite King child characters. He goes through so much, some of his sections really bring me the feels. And shout-out to Father Callahan, as well! And Jimmy... and Matt... the whole crew basically! I also had forgotten how chilling this book could be. Matt hearing someone upstairs... the childish giggle... the visitor at the window... the knives... I loved how spooked I felt at times! Truly a favourite King of mine. 5 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    William Gwynne

    I now have a YouTube channel that I run with my brother, called 'The Brothers Gwynne'. Check it out - The Brothers Gwynne “Turn off your television - in fact why don’t you turn off all the lights except the one by your favourite chair? - and we’ll talk about vampires in the dim. I think I can make you believe in them, because while I was working on this book, I believed in them myself.” Salem’s Lot is a genuinely scary read that kept me up at night after reading. This is my first read of a Step I now have a YouTube channel that I run with my brother, called 'The Brothers Gwynne'. Check it out - The Brothers Gwynne “Turn off your television - in fact why don’t you turn off all the lights except the one by your favourite chair? - and we’ll talk about vampires in the dim. I think I can make you believe in them, because while I was working on this book, I believed in them myself.” Salem’s Lot is a genuinely scary read that kept me up at night after reading. This is my first read of a Stephen King book. And I learnt why he is one of the bestselling authors of all time. I would argue that making a reader feel genuine fear is one of the hardest things to accomplish. Yet King does this with consistent ease. “Talk did no good with bullies. Hurting was the only language that the bullies of the world seemed to understand, and he supposed that was why the world always had such a hard time getting along.” One of the incredible parts of this story is how King does not only establish and build on his core characters, but he manages to form almost an entire town of people, with their own unique personalities that are subtly implemented in just a few sentences. This really brought the story to life and is the only book I have read that has succeeded in this. The prose of Stephen King is wonderfully accessible to all. It is smooth, inviting and subtly yet effectively relays all the information and tension that King desired. The natural progression of the hurting manages to form so much fear and tension in the reader. It is simply put, masterful. “For the small children, bedtime is come. Time for the babies to be packed into their beds and cribs by parents who smile at their cries to be let up a little longer, to leave the light on. The indulgently open closet doors to show there is nothing in there. And all around them, the bestiality of the night rises on tenebrous wings. The vampires time has come.” As well as brilliantly forming a wide cast, the core group were brilliant. Susan, Ben, Matt, Mark (brilliant), Father Callahan and Jimmy. Together they were so great, with their interactions and dialogue so true to their characters. They each had their own flaws, and you loved them in their moments of strength and bravery. The singular weakness I can think of this story his that while the ending was good, I personally did not think it was on par with the rest of this wonderfully told story. Overall, Salem’s Lot has made certain that I will be reading plenty more of King, probably starting with his short story collection, Different Seasons, which has The Green Mile and Shawshank Redemption within. This is not a story for the fainthearted. A brilliant story of vampires and the terrors of the night. 5/5 STARS Full review now on BookNest...BookNest - 'Salem's Lot

  5. 5 out of 5

    Franzi

    3.5 Stars Somehow I expected to like this more than I did. I read the short story Jerusalem's Lot back in 2018 and loved the creepy atmosphere, which I missed in this book. I still like the story and the way in which the vampires are displayed, I liked the characters but didn't love them and some parts were as creepy and spooky as I expected. But for the most part I felt kind of neutral towards what was happening. I think it's a solid horror story, but sadly it didn't feel special for me. 3.5 Stars Somehow I expected to like this more than I did. I read the short story Jerusalem's Lot back in 2018 and loved the creepy atmosphere, which I missed in this book. I still like the story and the way in which the vampires are displayed, I liked the characters but didn't love them and some parts were as creepy and spooky as I expected. But for the most part I felt kind of neutral towards what was happening. I think it's a solid horror story, but sadly it didn't feel special for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    Ahh there's something cathartic about reading an old-school vamp novel. Classic, day-hating, blood-sucking, savage vampires. Exactly how I like them. King goes to great lengths to set the scene early so we learn all about the town and its inhabitants riiiight before evil runs rampant and everyone is picked off slowly. What's the point of offing people we don't care for? I love reading these old classic King novels because they really do demonstrate why he's so successful. His stories suck you in an Ahh there's something cathartic about reading an old-school vamp novel. Classic, day-hating, blood-sucking, savage vampires. Exactly how I like them. King goes to great lengths to set the scene early so we learn all about the town and its inhabitants riiiight before evil runs rampant and everyone is picked off slowly. What's the point of offing people we don't care for? I love reading these old classic King novels because they really do demonstrate why he's so successful. His stories suck you in and give real chills. They make you part of what's happening and this particular story will have you keeping away from windows at night and refusing to enter dark spaces. There's not really too much I can say that hasn't already been said except that I'm preeeetty sure this story came into being before Star Wars so it was fun to read references to The Force. And I'm not even a Star Wars nerd (My poison is LOTR, just FYI). I loved the way this terrified me, gave me shudders and shivers and made me think a lot about staying away from the windows. I enjoyed the speed at which everything happened (which seems weird for such a long book that spends so much time talking about the town) and I loved that it felt like a super classy B-Grade horror film only actually brilliantly done. So A-Grade, I guess? The characters were a lot of fun (I'm not gonna get all feminist over it, it was written in the 70s, after all) and I loved that Mark played such a big part because kids are too often underestimated but I think it was quite honest the way Mark believed the easiest. Kids don't question. They just believe. (view spoiler)[Also Callahan is the main reason I was driven to read this book because of his part in The Dark Tower series, beginning from Wolves of the Calla. So I loved reading his part but I'm also so grateful for having read that series first because Callahan's ending here is pretty abrupt so it's nice to kinda know what happened to him in the end! Although now it's chronologically messed up for me so I feel like I gotta read that series again. (hide spoiler)] I feel like I'm rambling a bit here so let me just sum up by saying this is a classic. It's old school King, old school vampires, and it is one heck of a creepy story. Totally lived up to the hype. Oh! I just wanna add ... (view spoiler)[Barlow's death scene was one of the most epic death scenes I've ever read. All that description ... Even if death the dude was creepy AF. This is why King is the KING, folks. *shudder* (hide spoiler)] *** Bonus Content Short Story: One For the Road Ehh. It was interesting to get the feel for the town further down the track, but it's not essential. I enjoyed it, but more the ending than the first few pages of slogging. A story this short I'm not really that keen for details on the weather. Short Story: Jerusalem's Lot DNF. To be honest, 'Salem's Lot finished on such a great note so this extra stuff kinda spoiled the mood. So I might come back to this later. Deleted Scenes Same. I don't watch the extras on DVDs, either, unless it's something I'm obsessed with. With this I figured, there had to be a reason why he cut them out, right? So might come back to it later.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Gwynne

    I finished Salem's Lot last night. It was as brilliant and tense as I remember from my childhood. There is a reason why King is one of the bestselling authors of all time... I finished Salem's Lot last night. It was as brilliant and tense as I remember from my childhood. There is a reason why King is one of the bestselling authors of all time...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    2022: 3rd read. I love the slow build up, as King establishes the Lot and its residents. And it just makes the ensuing havoc even more fun. 2019: My second time reading this was even better than my first. I took my time, got to know the Lot and its inhabitants, and I loved every minute. Great writing, plot and characters. Compelling edge-of-the-seat stuff, all wrapped up with a satisfying ending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liam Mulvaney

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I was a younger lad watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I always imagined becoming a vampire hunter someday. I often kept wooden stakes carved by yours truly and bought silver crosses and nail them in my room. It nearly drove my mother mad because my room looked like an unconsecrated chapel. And dad--well, ah, he laughed his butt off. I was young, and I was weird. Sadly, my dream of becoming a vampire hunter never came to pass, and I decided to become a software developer instead. The pay wa When I was a younger lad watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I always imagined becoming a vampire hunter someday. I often kept wooden stakes carved by yours truly and bought silver crosses and nail them in my room. It nearly drove my mother mad because my room looked like an unconsecrated chapel. And dad--well, ah, he laughed his butt off. I was young, and I was weird. Sadly, my dream of becoming a vampire hunter never came to pass, and I decided to become a software developer instead. The pay was better, and my original dream faded like mist later on because I never found any vampires hidden in the dark. So, you could've imagined how I felt when I read this book decades later through the viewpoints of Mark Petrie, Ben Mears, Matt Burke, Dr Jimmy Cody, Father Callahan and the beautiful Susan Norton. And I didn't know anything about 'Salem's Lot before I decided to read this. The novel follows Ben Mears, an author, who travels to 'Salem's Lot to finish his book and confront his childhood demons--of a wildly unkempt house with shuttered windows, haunted and situated on a hill alone. A younger Mears once saw the hanged ghost of Hubert Marsten inside of this house. Ben is not the only stranger that arrives in this town. Mr Straker, an abled businessman, opens an antique furniture store with his mysterious partner, Mr Barlow, from Austria. Thinks get weird when the duo arrive, and a boy goes missing... (you'll have to read the book to find out what happens) First off: the characters are so talentedly perfect. King does an excellent job conveying horror through the eyes of his characters. The mood is right, and people behave just as they should've if you or I were experiencing these mysterious circumstances. King also has a fascinating argument about old vs young people. A child can believe that vampires might exist. At the same time, older people might have a harder time believing these creatures are haunting the dark moonlit streets preying on victims because society expects us to be realists. Older people might question the validity of this outlandish event (as people begin to disappear) and go mad after they encounter it. Still, young Mark Petrie sleeps well after confronting one of the vampires who knocked on his window at night because he accepts it. 'Salem's Lot is one of the best books I've ever read because I love reading about the horror aspect of vampires. Vampires are not sexy, but vampires are the undead, dead but not dead--and the dead stink. The novel feels close to Dracula and pays a worthy homage to the classic. King even hints that Matt Burke is like his own version of Abraham Van Hellsing, going so far as to create a scene where Ben and Jimmy say so. Why should you read this? It is a realistic scenario where vampires haunt a small urban town. The book does not introduce these folkloristic creatures as newly discovered creatures (like Hollywood does). It treats them as the main event, something unholy governed by the principles of researched folklore. King expects us to know what these creatures are, but he also shows us how to defeat them. Whether the protagonists are successful, well, you'll have to read it and find out. It's no roses and butterflies, people. It's dark and sometimes unholy. Thanks for reading this review! 5/5

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    It is one of the greatest vampire tales ever written since Dracula first came into publication in 1897. It is Stephen King’s second novel, and is the book that he says, “…typed [him] as a horror writer.”. So far, two movies have been based on 'Salem’s Lot… Many people dislike the 2004 version, but I enjoyed both adaptations equally. Most of you die-hard King and hardcore vampire fans know the story: Ben Mears (view spoiler)[moves back to the town of Jerusalem’s Lot ('Salem's Lot as it is It is one of the greatest vampire tales ever written since Dracula first came into publication in 1897. It is Stephen King’s second novel, and is the book that he says, “…typed [him] as a horror writer.”. So far, two movies have been based on 'Salem’s Lot… Many people dislike the 2004 version, but I enjoyed both adaptations equally. Most of you die-hard King and hardcore vampire fans know the story: Ben Mears (view spoiler)[moves back to the town of Jerusalem’s Lot ('Salem's Lot as it is referred to by the natives) to exorcise his own personal demons surrounding The Marsten House. Only is he to discover that a real, literal demon, Kurt Barlow and his minion, R.T. Straker...both operating as antique dealers...have purchased the dark house. (hide spoiler)] Barlow (…Dracula??), (view spoiler)[turns out to be a very old and very powerful vampire who spreads vampirism over "the Lot" like an epidemic. He is, however, hounded by a circle of vampire hunters intent on destroying him. (hide spoiler)] This, however, is a special edition of Stephen King’s vampire novel. This is 'Salem’s Lot:Illustrated Edition. It contains at least fifty pages of deleted material from the original manuscript, two short stories from Night Shift that are related to the events in 'Salem’s Lot, and some very creepy photographs as well. This is my third time reading 'Salem’s Lot, however, reading this edition is like discovering the book all over again! Boy is that deleted material terrifying!! King’s original vision was to combine Bram Stoker’s infamous vampire Count from Dracula with the vampires he had read about in the E.C. comics, Tales from the Crypt and The Vault of Horror, of the 1950’s (man…I wish those comics were still around!) into one gruesome vampire tale. He wanted blood parties, vampire restaurants, etc. Really gory, terrifying vampires! Well, unfortunately, it didn’t exactly work out that way, but I think he really did a bang-up job with 'Salem’s Lot! Barlow is one of the scariest, EVIL bloodsuckers I have come across aside from Rudy Pasko and Skinner Sweet. And we need more vampires like Barlow in print….scary, evil bloodsucking monsters! Especially with all this romantic vampire bullshit that’s cluttering the market nowadays (not to mention the abomination that is Twilight….MAKES ME WANT TO FUCKING PUKE!!!!!). I would say that no library of a true vampire fan nor true Stephen King fan is complete without a copy of 'Salem’s Lot: Illustrated Edition. I will cherish this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Raven

    WHERE IS THE 6 STARS BUTTON?!?!?! If YOU have not read this book already... Where have you been?? Me? I've been under a rock wasting away hours with the likes of That twilight lady and Lauren Kate. WHY? Because I'm STUPID that's why. Stephen King. I love you. Forever and Always. Man, this guy is the best storyteller in America. His plot is perfect, though I was able to guess who would most def. become one of THEM But you know, I've read to much horror to not be able to guess at least one part o WHERE IS THE 6 STARS BUTTON?!?!?! If YOU have not read this book already... Where have you been?? Me? I've been under a rock wasting away hours with the likes of That twilight lady and Lauren Kate. WHY? Because I'm STUPID that's why. Stephen King. I love you. Forever and Always. Man, this guy is the best storyteller in America. His plot is perfect, though I was able to guess who would most def. become one of THEM But you know, I've read to much horror to not be able to guess at least one part of a horror genre book... Very much so the modernized DRACULA (Say with old timey accent) The story takes place in Jerusalem's Lot. A quiet small town where people begin disappearing and getting very sick after a young boy disappers. Soon the whole town is going down and no one wants to admit what it is. Soon everyone is sick, no one is unaffected by the rappings and dark shadows outside thier windows at night and people are literally dropping like flies. Zombie flies, because for some reason the dead keep disappearing from the morgue. Most creepilly, a little baby. The story goes from life to life showing all the little (and big) sins of a small town. Very good way to tell the story by the way. Lovely plot and descriptions. The Characters: Were horribly real. Sitting reading this, I kept cheering loudly in my mind for Ben (Jonathan from Dracula), Mark the little boy, Matt (VAN HELSING! Oh, i loved that man!) and Dr. Jimmy Cody who SERIOUS NOT A JOKE SPOILER (view spoiler)[ Dies a horrific death when falling from sawed off steps to be impaled on at least 12 kitchen knifes. (saves Mark's life by the way) (hide spoiler)] CHARACTER BREAKDOWN: BEN: Comes back to 'Salem's Lot after the death of his wife Miranda, (his fault? We never really know) to beat old demons. Really one demon, the one in the Marsten House. A dead man (Mobster) who shot his wife and then hung himself. As a boy growing up in the town with his aunt he goes into the house as an intention and swears he sees the man hanging from the ceiling staring at him. He then meets Susan. The house is most def. haunted just not by ghosts. Susan: Pretty rather stupid girl who falls in lust with Ben. (No love here. though they say it is) and who's rather whacked out ex is well... whacked out. She then does something incredible stupid yet bold and that's the part you horror buffs (Children of the Night as I like to call you) will be able to guess. Matt: Old school English teacher, is mainly VAN HELSING in this novel. Does a lot of research and mostly every soul in this book questions the poor old quack's sanity. Very funny guy though. Jimmy Cody: Just the Doc. He plays a big rule but I don't want too many spoilers in this. There are other not so important characters who grace the pages of this novel, but they are not so important and my arms are starting to hurt so. . . Run down: Evil town. Strong, sorrowfull man, Vampires. Oh, and by the way my dears, I am sooo sleeping with a light on.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mili

    Finally finished.....My second book by Stephen King...still not convinced if this is a writer for me...And just like Carrie the books are older work so maybe his newer books are more my thing? I dont know... Anyway I love vampires, I grew up with Anne Rice and I had a phase as a teenager where I loved all things dark and creepy. Especially the romanticised vampires in Anne Rice her stories. I dont like how King fills his plots, so many pointless talk and boring details. The horror aspect of it was Finally finished.....My second book by Stephen King...still not convinced if this is a writer for me...And just like Carrie the books are older work so maybe his newer books are more my thing? I dont know... Anyway I love vampires, I grew up with Anne Rice and I had a phase as a teenager where I loved all things dark and creepy. Especially the romanticised vampires in Anne Rice her stories. I dont like how King fills his plots, so many pointless talk and boring details. The horror aspect of it was great, and its not a bad thing necessarily that it takes long for the suspence to build and is stretched out. But the way its filled here and there...ugh XD its also funny in a way....how the vampires are portrayed...like the cheesy old school ones in movies...apparantly deriving from books like these. I loved that so much! They are spooky, scary and take control over you. You dont get a chance if youre not prepared. So thats cool. I cant say I really enjoyed it. It started out okay, I didnt know what I was getting into. So that made me curious and focussed. And I enjoyed when the vampires became part of the plot and people died haha. After all the excitement the book became flat. Im still thinking of trying out The Shining but damn this one got me down again just like Carrie... 2.5 starts rounding up to 3.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kaila

    4.5/5 stars “And all around them, the bestiality of the night rises on tenebrous wings. The vampire’s time has come.” Wow! This has truly blown me away. What started as a slow burn novel turned into a fully intense, action-packed and thrilling tale about creatures of the night. I have long fallen in love with Stephen King's writing but this book has made me admire him so much more. The characters were fantastically written and well-constructed, as well as being immensely interesting to read ab 4.5/5 stars “And all around them, the bestiality of the night rises on tenebrous wings. The vampire’s time has come.” Wow! This has truly blown me away. What started as a slow burn novel turned into a fully intense, action-packed and thrilling tale about creatures of the night. I have long fallen in love with Stephen King's writing but this book has made me admire him so much more. The characters were fantastically written and well-constructed, as well as being immensely interesting to read about. Even better were the relationships and the role that each character played in the small town which felt so real and so tangible to me. And most importantly, this is by far the best vampire book that I've read. I was so captivated by the spread of evil and vampires through the town, so this book has renewed my love for vampires in literature. On the outside, Jerusalem’s Lot is like any other small town. It’s gossipy, close knit and full of seemingly average people going about their day. The only really notable thing about Jerusalem’s Lot is the Marsten House that seems to look over the town. The house has a lot of stories and mystery tied to it, which is why Ben Mears is back in town. He wants to exorcise the demons of his past that relate to the dark and mystery surrounding the house. But Ben Mears isn’t the only new person in town, another mysterious stranger has come to town, and he’s bought the Marsten House. Just as there are strange stories tied to that house, strange things start to happen when it's reoccupied. Ben and other open-minded town folk believe that the people living in the Marsten house have everything to do with these dark happenings, but they uncover a lot more than they originally intended to while investigating it. “The town kept its secrets, and the Marsten House brooded over it like a ruined king.” I hate to say that this is just a vampire story, because that doesn’t do justice to the book. This is so much more than the recent vampire novels that have come out. There are no sexy, sparkly vampires in this book, these ones are a lot darker and unforgiving than pop culture would have us believe. The vampire story in this book was so well thought out. It was a slow build tale about evil spreading throughout a small town, and vampires were the way that happened. I love how the circumstances in the book and the atmosphere of the story gradually got darker just as evil spread through the town. Things got so much more exciting as the book progressed as the vampires got more confident and more rampant around the lot. I don’t know if I’m making sense, but I just don’t want to reveal too much but still want to show how much I loved the dark, gritty feel of the vampires in this novel. One thing that was absolutely phenomenally done was the setting and characters of the small town. I grew up in a relatively small town myself, so I really related to all the characters that we were introduced to. There were so many characters in this novel who were all interesting and unique, but still epitomised that small town environment. I think the small town setting was really well developed in this book. I could see people sitting at the diner, the old women gossiping over the phone and the small trailer park homes. I wasn’t just a casual bystander, I felt as if I was completely apart of the community, meaning I was so enveloped in the story. The smaller town atmosphere also worked amazingly well with the vampire story. The in depth development of the close knit characters and setting really meant that the vampires could spread like the plague. It was as if I was watching evil jump from person to person, even if they didn’t know it, and I could do absolutely nothing to stop it. “The basis of all human fears, he thought. A closed door, slightly ajar.” I don’t know how to describe what I’m about to say other than saying this book was just so well plotted. The story felt so fluid and natural, I was so easily swept up into the world of the novel and taken along for the ride. It was definitely a slow build, which I was worried about at the start because I tend to get bored easily if there aren't a lot of things happening. But soon I just let myself be taken along at the pace of the story and I found myself completely addicted to the plot and the characters. As it was quite slow at the beginning, everything seemed so much more vivid in my mind. It also built a heap of tension and suspense as small mysterious events eventually grew into full-blown excitement. When I say things picked up speed as the novel progressed, I really mean it. At the beginning I was focusing on the development of the town and characters, but before I knew it was all about the action and excitement of the novel. From about the middle of the novel onwards, my heart was racing and I couldn’t put the book down. There are so many characters in this book that all add to the story, but we really got to know the main characters very well. Ben, Matt, Mark, Susan and even Father Callahan really grew on me until I was completely invested in their lives. They were all such well-developed, interesting and charming characters, I couldn't help but to love them. They formed this kind of team in trying to save the town, which, for some reason, made me insanely happy. I think I just really love team efforts and good old crime solving, so they definitely appealed to that part of me. Being so invested in certain characters also made me even more addicted to the story, because I was worried for their safety and whether they were going to survive.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jess at TeamAsthers.co.uk

    Follow me on the interwebs: Blog + Twitter + Facebook + Instagram “And all around them, the bestiality of the night rises on tenebrous wings. The vampire’s time has come.” Nothing says I love you more than your boyfriend buying you a copy of this book because he knew you'd love it, and you know what? I did. I absolutely loved it 😍 Cunning, relentless and spilling with bloodlust, King delivers an exceptional retelling and homage to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Set in small-town Maine, Ben Me Follow me on the interwebs: Blog + Twitter + Facebook + Instagram “And all around them, the bestiality of the night rises on tenebrous wings. The vampire’s time has come.” Nothing says I love you more than your boyfriend buying you a copy of this book because he knew you'd love it, and you know what? I did. I absolutely loved it 😍 Cunning, relentless and spilling with bloodlust, King delivers an exceptional retelling and homage to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Set in small-town Maine, Ben Mears returns to his home town to write a book about the infamous Marsten House. Only something seems a little amis with the new owners (that's an understatement). This is not the tale of a vampire you take to be a lover or a friend. This is the chilling tale of a vampire and his army of the night that will destroy you from the inside out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    King’s second novel after the success of Carrie, this introduces the small town plagued by a supernatural element that becomes synonymous with he’s writing. The main protagonist is writer Ben Mears, who returns to he’s childhood town after 25 years. So many of King’s stories focuses on a writer, it’s such a great way to lead into the story. The book slowly increase the tension and the vampires are so creepy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Richard K. Wilson

    This is sure not the scary assed book it was when I originally read it over 40 years ago.....actually it was not even scary! It was so funny because if you have seen the Tobe Hooper TV movie from forever ago, you have seen the BEST version of the book.....yes, this book was actually slow and boring. Now it makes sense to me that so many first time readers of this 2nd book of Kings, have said that they DNF'd it, and they thought it was boring! The funniest thing about this book.....nothing even h This is sure not the scary assed book it was when I originally read it over 40 years ago.....actually it was not even scary! It was so funny because if you have seen the Tobe Hooper TV movie from forever ago, you have seen the BEST version of the book.....yes, this book was actually slow and boring. Now it makes sense to me that so many first time readers of this 2nd book of Kings, have said that they DNF'd it, and they thought it was boring! The funniest thing about this book.....nothing even happens for the first almost 125 pages, and the character of Mark Petrie is hardly even in it, NOT like the Lance Kerwin character was in the movie. I still think Robert R. McCammon's "They Thirst" is a better vampire novel than this.....sorry all you King fans. After reading this over 40 years ago, it was time for a reread of my number 3 favorite King book of all time! So, in 2005 i spent almost $40 for this 'newly expanded' and illustrated edition! It says that it has 52 pages of additionally added pages of previously unpublished material, AND photography illustrated! Don't fall for it.....they are added (the Uncut pages....that is) at the end of the book all together, explaining how and why it was changed. Just stay with the copy that you have. Richard

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    Don't bite me just because I only gave this one 3 stars! I remember reading this as a child and thinking to myself, "OMG when is something going to actually happen?!" and also thinking King is way too overly detailed sometimes. Now, to be honest, I did giggle a bit at the fact that it took up to 45% through the read for something to actually happen. However, I will say that while I still think he CAN be overly detailed (fight me), I do appreciate that these all develop the characters and give yo Don't bite me just because I only gave this one 3 stars! I remember reading this as a child and thinking to myself, "OMG when is something going to actually happen?!" and also thinking King is way too overly detailed sometimes. Now, to be honest, I did giggle a bit at the fact that it took up to 45% through the read for something to actually happen. However, I will say that while I still think he CAN be overly detailed (fight me), I do appreciate that these all develop the characters and give you a detailed imaging of the world he is creating. Also, I had to also giggle at the fact that King used a "that's what she said" joke which just reminds us of how long this joke has been around. Did Mr. Straker and his shop remind anyone else a little bit of Leland Guant? Just me? Listen, I'm a huge King fan and am always impressed with his writing. And as a King fan I have my likes and dislikes of his work. I also think that as you read a lot by one author, you determine how you feel based on how you may have felt about another piece of said author's work. I still have a lot of love for this book but I don't think I'd reread it another time. I am glad that I did see how it resonated now compared to as when I was a kid. A better appreciation of the build and story, but still not my favorite.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michela

    I knew it. I knew that I had to read this book years and years ago, before the big vampire invasion. But for some reasons I never did and now I regret it. I liked this book, but I was not interested in it. Not sure if that makes sense. And I am really sorry to rate Salem's Lot only 3 stars since it's one of the most loved books of the King. I guess I picked the wrong time to read it and I didn't really connect with the characters. I also hate when I can predict a twist, which happened during this I knew it. I knew that I had to read this book years and years ago, before the big vampire invasion. But for some reasons I never did and now I regret it. I liked this book, but I was not interested in it. Not sure if that makes sense. And I am really sorry to rate Salem's Lot only 3 stars since it's one of the most loved books of the King. I guess I picked the wrong time to read it and I didn't really connect with the characters. I also hate when I can predict a twist, which happened during this reading and it's quite rare for me when it comes to King's books. But I loved where the story takes place and I adored Barlow and his 100% evil and overwhelming presence. Recommended for old-school horror lovers!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    It has been years since I originally read this book, but after all this time, it didn't disappoint. I live in the country where it gets very dark at night and the woods surrounding the house and area can be somewhat spooky. One friend said I was moving into a "Stephen King house" when I first moved in. Well, when reading Salem's Lot, let's just say I didn't want to go outside at night. As far as this volume, it was a nice treat. The photographs were excellent and added to the dark theme of the bo It has been years since I originally read this book, but after all this time, it didn't disappoint. I live in the country where it gets very dark at night and the woods surrounding the house and area can be somewhat spooky. One friend said I was moving into a "Stephen King house" when I first moved in. Well, when reading Salem's Lot, let's just say I didn't want to go outside at night. As far as this volume, it was a nice treat. The photographs were excellent and added to the dark theme of the book. The two short stories were a nice touch as well. "One for the Road" serves as a direct followup to the end of Salem's Lot, and "Jerusalem's Lot" tells some interesting backstory to the town's history. I like how it was told through letters and diary entries, reminding me of Stoker's Dracula, which the Salem's Lot novel was inspired by. It also had a deep Lovecraft feel to it. The deleted scenes were ok. Interesting without being essential. I beleive that the original Salem's Lot editors did a good job by filtering this out or making the changes to the eventual published novel. It was cool to see some of the early writing in the novel and a variety on some of the material. Especially the rats. They were pretty nasty. But I think it was a good idea to filter them out of the story because as nasty gory as they were, the original tension in the novel served its purpose very well without rats. They actually became a distraction. So like with the majority of DVD bonus scenes, these were enjoyable for a glance through, but not important to the story experience. On a further re-read, I'll probably skip the deleted scenes.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emma Garland

    He gazed at it, fascinated. Warring emotions crossed his face with kaleidoscopic swiftness. ‘Still here’ he murmured aloud. ‘By god’. Ben Mears returns to Jerusalem lot after many years to write a novel based on the creepy experience he had in the marsten house as a child. Once settled he tries to rent the house only to discover it has been sold after remaining vacant for decades. The new owners appear shifty, one away on a buying trip in New York. As Ben becomes familiar with the townsfolk, str He gazed at it, fascinated. Warring emotions crossed his face with kaleidoscopic swiftness. ‘Still here’ he murmured aloud. ‘By god’. Ben Mears returns to Jerusalem lot after many years to write a novel based on the creepy experience he had in the marsten house as a child. Once settled he tries to rent the house only to discover it has been sold after remaining vacant for decades. The new owners appear shifty, one away on a buying trip in New York. As Ben becomes familiar with the townsfolk, strange things begin to happen. A child disappears, a dog is found hung on the cemetery gates and people start dropping like flies. But nobody believes in vampires ... right? A cracking novel that had me hollering the classic ‘DONT GO UP THE STAIRS’ lines. It features numerous characters that collectively come together giving the small community vibe. The chapters roll from one person to another, the warm and likeable to the cold and murderous. I was tentative to turn the page in places knowing all the horror was about to come seeping out 😱. I don’t believe Salem’s lot is quite on par with the stand or the shining but it still gets a solid four stars from me. ✨

  21. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Not my favorite King. I think the biggest thing is that that book doesn't give you a chance to rest between scenes. Also the women were given very little importance I felt and done away with in this book. It would have been great to have some of them for the final fight or the list of survivors. I also think that the book at times was scary, but not as scary as King could have made it. There were also some minor plot holes here and there too. "Salem's Lot" was a pretty interesting look at vampire Not my favorite King. I think the biggest thing is that that book doesn't give you a chance to rest between scenes. Also the women were given very little importance I felt and done away with in this book. It would have been great to have some of them for the final fight or the list of survivors. I also think that the book at times was scary, but not as scary as King could have made it. There were also some minor plot holes here and there too. "Salem's Lot" was a pretty interesting look at vampires in Maine. We follow a writer, Ben, as he goes back to Salem's Lot. He has fond memories of the town from when he stayed there with his aunt as a boy. He returns in order to write and maybe lay to rest a house called the Marsten House had on him too. Ben meets a young woman, Susan, and they start to date. When two young boys go missing, with one found later out of his mind the town starts to wonder if Ben could be linked to (at least Susan's mother does) and then Ben starts to reveal what he found out about the last owner of the house. Quickly things start to go bump in the night. I can't really say that I had a favorite of anyone in this book besides Mark. That kid had guts. King always knows how to write kids. Mark gets hit with a lot and honestly reminds me a bit of the young boy in "Desperation" who dealt with his family being murdered and still going on to confront evil. Ben felt colorless to me, Susan too for that matter. I think most of the adults did. King also spent time developing some characters and not others. For example, Father Callahan felt developed to me, but others like Matt and Jimmy felt only two dimensional. I really wish that women had been given a bigger role in this one. The one character we can see as a co-lead would be Susan. And Susan was there to build up Ben it seemed and that was it. We have Ben saying things like he liked Susan, maybe even loved her. Gee thanks dude. I also wish that King had spent more time building up Barlow and Richard Straker. They are the villains in this piece but they felt like dime store villains. I think I am just disappointed since this is the same King that created It and the Crimson King. I wanted to see the supreme daddy of vampires. Speaking on that, I have to say that this wasn't that scary. If you are a horror fan I think you will like this book fine. The writing was okay, the flow was off though from beginning to end. At first the book promises to be a story about a haunted or evil house. And then the house really is not that important to the story. We focus on the vampires and the house just felt like a house and that was it. I wanted to get more of a sense of menace from that location. I wanted to feel as if Marsten House was insane. The world building is just a typical one with vampires and them dying by stake, afraid of holy water and crosses. I was hoping for some mythology aspects that would be pretty cool to read about, but nothing much here. The ending was just okay. We are left with the survivors back ready to take on the Lot. King includes two short stories about the beginning of Salem's Lot and another that talks about what happened to the town two years after the events of that book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aric Cushing

    One of the best vampire books ever written. Bar none. End of story. Thank you very much. Seeing an author's take on the 'vampire' genre is always great, seeing King's take on it, brilliant. Since he's written a sequel to The Shining, maybe it's time for a sequel to Salem's Lot? One of the best vampire books ever written. Bar none. End of story. Thank you very much. Seeing an author's take on the 'vampire' genre is always great, seeing King's take on it, brilliant. Since he's written a sequel to The Shining, maybe it's time for a sequel to Salem's Lot?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kandice

    I’ve said this in numerous places, but “Salem’s Lot is my favorite book by Stephen King. It’s a close margin, and there are numerous ties for second place, but I always fall back on this one as my favorite. Imagine my surprise when a couple of years ago I saw that this book was published and I missed it! Perish the thought! So I finally tracked down a first edition (used, but almost perfect) to add to my collection and decided I would NOT allow myself to read the “deleted scenes” until I had fin I’ve said this in numerous places, but “Salem’s Lot is my favorite book by Stephen King. It’s a close margin, and there are numerous ties for second place, but I always fall back on this one as my favorite. Imagine my surprise when a couple of years ago I saw that this book was published and I missed it! Perish the thought! So I finally tracked down a first edition (used, but almost perfect) to add to my collection and decided I would NOT allow myself to read the “deleted scenes” until I had finished the original. Let me say that I never feel that there are enough words in a Stephen King book. People complain about his lack of editing, but I am NOT one of those people! I would read the guy’s grocery list. Having said that, I will admit that most of these edits were sound. I would never have complained had they been inserted into the tale where they belonged, especially if the names had been appropriately changed to fit, but reading them at the end, as I did, I can see why they were cut. I don’t feel I am spoiling anything by talking about the contents of these deleted scenes, because they are just that...deleted, but for those of you that hate spoilers (view spoiler)[ I did not need to see Susan screaming obscenities and offering to ball Ben in front of everyone. That entire exchange felt out of place for me. I really dislike the original name King had for Barlow. Barlow has a nice ring to it and flows off the tongue of the mind. Sarlinov just does not. I also don’t like the idea of actually “seeing” Barlow, as soon as we do, with one of the deleted scenes. King has always been a master at keeping the real menace in the shadows until the last minute. With the inclusion of this particular scene, there is no mystery left. I prefer the “Bruce the Shark” approach. The only other scene I feel would have changed the tone of the book is the conversation between Ben and Matt regarding Ben’s finances. Because I love adore worship like King as much as I do I tend to see little glimpses of him in his characters. I would not have liked reading about Ben Mears’ squandering of a small fortune, or even about how little he was actually paid for what other characters' describe as an excellent novel. (hide spoiler)] I’m very happy I bought and read this. The few illustrations/photos are just enough to lend another level of creepiness to an already terrifying book. They don’t overwhelm the story, and including One for the Road and Jerusalem’s Lot was a stroke of genius. Tacking the deleted scenes on at the end was also the right choice with these. Unlike the deletions that were later added to The Uncut Stand these didn’t improve or add to the story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    What a juggernaut of a book. A King masterpiece. Is there anyone who started their career better...Carrie, then Salems lot...the shining . This is what you get when you take classic Vampire mythology, Kings Best small town America, great character and setting building and eerie children and a bad ass priest ( that shows up in later king works) and yes...a heroic writer! I will be rereading this only because you can't read this just once and it has been way too long already. 1/14/22- I just finishe What a juggernaut of a book. A King masterpiece. Is there anyone who started their career better...Carrie, then Salems lot...the shining . This is what you get when you take classic Vampire mythology, Kings Best small town America, great character and setting building and eerie children and a bad ass priest ( that shows up in later king works) and yes...a heroic writer! I will be rereading this only because you can't read this just once and it has been way too long already. 1/14/22- I just finished re-reading this king classic. I re- read the Shining recently as well and , for me, this book is the epitome of classic King. You see how King crafts and builds his small Maine town, making the reader feel they live there. In the chapters labeled "the lot" you go from home to home and at first it builds upon the town and immerses you into the fabric of the town only to show the reader the rapid and tragic fall of that same town. Brilliant. Lots of creepy scenes and scenes that make you uncomfortable. The MacDougal baby scenes are uncomfortable to sit through as well as some mentions of rape with a married wife who has extramarital affairs. The funeral home scene was great as was the Marsten house scenes, Barlowes death, Susan's last scene, the initial scenes in Matt Burkes house and hearing the intruder upstairs and then the child's laughter....goosebumps. I love the homage to Dracula. Matt Burke as Van Helsing, Ben Mears as Harker, Susan as his Fiance, Straker as Renfield. Just a great idea. Classic "what if" as in what if Dracula took place in small town USA?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marnie (Enchanted Bibliophile)

    Alone. Yes, that’s the key word, the most awful word in the English tongue. Murder doesn’t hold a candle to it and hell is only a poor synonym … This exceptionally well chose word of King will forever be with me! There’s just one thing he got wrong… Alone in not just the most awful word in the English tongue, it’s pretty awful in almost any language! And exactly what I felt during this entire book! Starting this book I vaguely remember I was never going to read it, but the reason was unclear! Lost Alone. Yes, that’s the key word, the most awful word in the English tongue. Murder doesn’t hold a candle to it and hell is only a poor synonym … This exceptionally well chose word of King will forever be with me! There’s just one thing he got wrong… Alone in not just the most awful word in the English tongue, it’s pretty awful in almost any language! And exactly what I felt during this entire book! Starting this book I vaguely remember I was never going to read it, but the reason was unclear! Lost in a haze of “Twilight”; “Sookie Stackhouse” and “Vampire Diaries”. How could I ever have forgotten? The trepidation I once held for Vampires??? How could I have almost fell in love with the sexy things form HBO (sorry Eric!), King hand-in-hand with my imaginations gave me sleepless nights and night terrors that will keep me detained for a long, long, long time! This epic horror made me feel like a little girl again, to afraid to turn to the next page, but to damn prying to stop form actually truing the page! King just have this addictive style in this book that could keep you going no matter the terror that grew in your body, heart or soul! I am not removing my sliver cross necklace for a long, long time! Garlic and Roses are on my every day shopping list and I’m greeting all my guest visiting at night with “God damn you” and I will never ever invite anyone into my house ever again! Excellent work Mr. King!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah (needs a break from reviewing)

    3/2 - 751 pages (plus uncounted Roman-numeraled introduction pages) in 3.75 days - started as soon as I got it home 15:30ish on Tuesday, finished this (Saturday) morning at 10ish - pretty pleased with myself and amazed that a book of this length could draw my attention so well that I could barely put it down to sleep (and then only when I was starting to lose track of what was going on). My favourite part, because it was absolutely the scariest (and that's what I was looking for in this book), wa 3/2 - 751 pages (plus uncounted Roman-numeraled introduction pages) in 3.75 days - started as soon as I got it home 15:30ish on Tuesday, finished this (Saturday) morning at 10ish - pretty pleased with myself and amazed that a book of this length could draw my attention so well that I could barely put it down to sleep (and then only when I was starting to lose track of what was going on). My favourite part, because it was absolutely the scariest (and that's what I was looking for in this book), was the scene where Crockett's men were making the delivery to the store and then the Marsten house. My heart still pounds a little with the tension of that scene. I'm a pretty picky horror reader because I'm so hard to scare when there's no tension ratchetting music before something jumps out from off camera. Horror movies don't have to work nearly as hard to get me jumping, which is why I'm really looking forward to watching one or both of the tv miniseries that were made (after Wikipediaing it I was very interested to read that the 2004 version was actually filmed in country Victoria, Australia). The edition I read, ISBN 9781 444 708 141, was extra fantastic because they'd included the two short stories from the Lot's universe, One for the Road and Jerusalem's Lot, as well as interesting background straight from King in the introduction and afterword, AND a pile of deleted scenes showing the different directions King was thinking of taking the book in. Reading the two related short stories right after finishing the book was the best time to read them. If I had unknowingly waited till I got to that short story collection somewhere down the line (I'm mostly reading them in publication order), it might have taken me a bit before I realised One for the Road was a Lot story and it's possible I wouldn't have enjoyed the epistolary Jerusalem's Lot as much as I did because I wouldn't have picked up on the little bits of background it included. There were a few scenes that I think would have worked better than what ended up getting published (at least for me). I liked King's original name for Barlow, Sarlinov; I was really creeped out by the rat hordes; I thought Ben and Susan's original discussion in Ben (II) was better, plus we get more information about the book Ben is writing and I thought that was interesting; the same with Ben's discussion with Matt over a plate of spaghetti; the deleted scenes of Dud visiting Ruthie Crockett and Randy McDougall visiting his mother were very disturbing and I guess that's probably why King omitted them; Barlow using a tape recording instead of a letter was nearly enough to make me jump; Callahan's original fate was much more gory and upsetting for the others when they find him, but of course then he wouldn't have been able to make appearances in future books (I wonder if King was already contemplating that and that's why he changed what happened?); the scene where Jimmy and Mark start flushing out the vampires was completely switched (maybe the sensibilities of the readers was on King's mind?); and finally the scene in Eva's basement obviously had to be changed if the rats were gone, but I think the rats would have terrified me - the idea of them swarming over me and biting me makes me shudder in combined disgust and fear. For me, 'Salem's Lot lost something with the removal of most of the rats, with those deleted rats scenes included I probably would have given this five stars and actually contemplated whether I might have had nightmares that involved swarming rats in dark cellars, as it was I just didn't feel the horror the way I wanted to. On to The Stand!!!! 6/02 - Just finished the 1979 movie. Wasn't impressed with the directorial changes or the way things like the sight of blood had to be removed to appease the television censors. Straker was nothing like the way I imagined him from King's writing - he was too polite, too nice to the townspeople, with no hint of menace beneath the smile, and also seemed nervous of Barlow, an impression I definitely didn't get from the book. I also didn't like the choice to turn Barlow into a physical monster with no power of speech. The hissing noises he made while being staked reminded me of Darth Vader's death scene mixed with the sounds my dog makes when he wants my attention. I think a monster who appears to be a charming older man who can stroll the streets hunting victims any night he wants is far more scary than one who can only be seen by those he intends to kill because his appearance can not fail to go unnoticed. I was also disappointed by the cuts made to Susan's part - even though the result ended up being the same, it felt like a case of 'get the weak woman away from the danger so that the men can fight it'. Overall, I'd give that adaptation 1.5 stars out of 5. Finished the 2004 adaptation and compared to the previous one, it was fantastic. Much more faithful to the book, what changes the director decided to make made much more sense to me and kinda made the director of the previous series seem like a liar. He said, for example, that the final scene with Barlow had to be moved back to the Marsten house because it didn't make sense otherwise (according to a quote on the Wikipedia page from an interview he made about the making of the movie); it was in Eva's basement, where it belonged, in this version and it worked perfectly. I loved, and also laughed at, the Australian filming location - country Victoria (even if some of the snow on the ground might have been natural, if it was filmed in June/July) is no substitute for Maine. The trees were completely wrong - evergreen gum trees everywhere - making the wide shots of the town completely unrecognisable as being located in Maine (no sign of gum trees in a picture of Bangor in winter shown on the Maine Wikipedia page). But, because of the filming location I got to play 'pick the Australian star' with all bar one of the supporting cast members - Dan Byrd is American, everyone else was Australian with varying degrees of fame. I would give this adaptation 4 stars out of 5, it was about as good as the source material with a few tweaks and updates due to the 30 years in between.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brodie Gron

    Stephen King’s “coming out party” (as he puts it in the afterword), ‘Salem’s Lot, shows the countless strengths of the master of the macabre. His characters here, unlike in Carrie, include staples of future works: a tormented writer, a loved but not quite holistically understood child, an imperfect but lovable priest. His collection of characters working together here resembles more broadly future works. In ‘Salem’s Lot, the unique relationships between child, man, then, in this case, priest, ph Stephen King’s “coming out party” (as he puts it in the afterword), ‘Salem’s Lot, shows the countless strengths of the master of the macabre. His characters here, unlike in Carrie, include staples of future works: a tormented writer, a loved but not quite holistically understood child, an imperfect but lovable priest. His collection of characters working together here resembles more broadly future works. In ‘Salem’s Lot, the unique relationships between child, man, then, in this case, priest, physician, and teacher is something that we’ll later see in works ranging from The Dark Tower to The Bill Hodges Trilogy. The setting, a small town in Maine, will of course go on to become his signature. The enigmatic and mysterious introduction to a villain who is progressively revealed – revealed to be more sinister than initially imagined – is classic Stephen King. ‘Salem’s Lot exemplifies the best Stephen King traits, and many of them for the first time. It’s amazing because it could be argued that in many ways, here it is done best. The majority of the first half of the book is spent fleshing out the people of Jerusalem’s Lot. The secrets that they hide, the bits and pieces they’ve kept covered, the wrongs they do with no remorse, they’re all uncovered in the opening half. Barlow and Straker, the villains of the book are often lurking behind the scenes as the citizens of the Lot’s wrongs are revealed. A smart move by King. Layer by layer, the façade of Barlow and Straker is stripped back to reveal their true, horrifying nature. While this is going on, the hero of the story, Ben Mears the writer, arrives to the Lot (his childhood home) to face fears he never did when he was a boy. In the second half of the book, the committee of Ben, Mark (a young and bold boy), Matt (teacher), Jimmy (physician), and Father Callahan forms to face off against the evil that has deeply infected the town. The evil not birthed, but unhinged, by Barlow and Straker. ‘Salem’s Lot is a book about the evil that lies beneath us every day, about how easily that evil can surface and infect a community. And it’s also about facing your fears. The fears long undealt with, and the fears in front of our very eyes right now. It’s affecting and visceral, horrifying and tormenting, but it’s also encouraging, and it emboldens. King has said himself that when he started writing the story of Dracula, but set in a small town in Maine, he expected the vampires would win. As he wrote however, he found it wasn’t that simple. The characters he has breathed life into had more courage than he initially expected, and he allowed them to fight back in more profound ways than he had intended. King made the right move, and the novel he wrote, while frightening (one scene still stains the back of my eyelids two weeks after reading it), is elevated beyond pulp or horror genres. It is great, and affecting. Note: My edition features a foreword, afterword, an additional short story (One for the Road), and “deleted scenes”. None of which were essential, all of which added to the rich experience of reading my favourite writers 2nd novel. The deleted scenes I found especially charming, as they feature a note from the publisher explaining briefly the context for their initial creation, and the reasons for their final omission is left to the reader to determine.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nils | nilsreviewsit

    4.5 stars ‘Look and see the great creature of the night whom you would slay with your miserable little stick. Look upon me, scribbler. I have written in human lives, and blood has been my ink. Look upon me and despair!’ 🧛🏼‍♂️ I read Salem’s Lot knowing very little about the story, other than it was about vampires. I’m glad that I hadn’t read the synopsis or seen any spoilers (King is so well loved it’s hard to completely avoid spoilers!), because it made the whole experience so enjoyable, and intri 4.5 stars ‘Look and see the great creature of the night whom you would slay with your miserable little stick. Look upon me, scribbler. I have written in human lives, and blood has been my ink. Look upon me and despair!’ 🧛🏼‍♂️ I read Salem’s Lot knowing very little about the story, other than it was about vampires. I’m glad that I hadn’t read the synopsis or seen any spoilers (King is so well loved it’s hard to completely avoid spoilers!), because it made the whole experience so enjoyable, and intriguing throughout. 🧛🏼‍♂️ I’m not a big fan of a slow build up; I usually like shit to hit the fan pretty early on, but in this book the slow build really worked! I loved how King gave us details on Jerusalem’s Lot, especially the inhabitants of the town. Many chapters were spent building up characters; introducing their personalities, showing what kind of life they were leading, and then slowly weaving in all this creepy atmosphere that begins to infect through the town. 🧛🏼‍♂️ Once again King introduced some awesome characters, and the stand outs for me were Ben Mears and Mark Petrie. Ben I found to be well rounded, he had his flaws and weaknesses, but when it came down to it he was determined to do what was needed no matter the cost. Mark Petrie stole the show though, from the very first scene where Mark faces a schoolyard bully, I knew this kid was going to be my favourite! 🧛🏼‍♂️ The horror parts of the book were the best scenes. I can’t tell you how refreshing it was to see Vampires as the big predatory evil killers they were always meant to be. No glittery shit here! All the blood and gore was so well described, that even though it didn’t scare me, I still throughly loved visioning it all. I definitely recommend this as a great October read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Undomiel Books (Rosie)

    Considering this was King's second novel, this was possibly my favourite of his I have read this far! The plot was eerie, and I loved that it was character driven; it worked really well for this plot line. I also loved the additional content at the back, full of removed/edited scenes, and the epistolary section. There were a few grammatical issues that bugged me slightly, however I understand that King has a unique grasp on grammar to add to the atmosphere of his work, so I cannot fault it. All in Considering this was King's second novel, this was possibly my favourite of his I have read this far! The plot was eerie, and I loved that it was character driven; it worked really well for this plot line. I also loved the additional content at the back, full of removed/edited scenes, and the epistolary section. There were a few grammatical issues that bugged me slightly, however I understand that King has a unique grasp on grammar to add to the atmosphere of his work, so I cannot fault it. All in all, a brilliant read!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Since this is such an iconic horror tale I'm not going to go over the plot when hundreds doubtless already have on here, so I'm just going to tell you how much I enjoyed this book (can't believe I've taken this long to getting around to reading this classic). As King says in the afterword (written in 1999 in my edition), 'Salem's Lot was conceived from the thought 'what would happen if Dracula came to 1970s small town America?'. Most importantly of all, the populace wouldn't believe vampires were Since this is such an iconic horror tale I'm not going to go over the plot when hundreds doubtless already have on here, so I'm just going to tell you how much I enjoyed this book (can't believe I've taken this long to getting around to reading this classic). As King says in the afterword (written in 1999 in my edition), 'Salem's Lot was conceived from the thought 'what would happen if Dracula came to 1970s small town America?'. Most importantly of all, the populace wouldn't believe vampires were sucking the lifeblood (quite literally) out of their town, and that's where his true power lies. In the age of lighting at the flick of a switch to chase the shadows away, declining religiosity and the inexorable rise of acquisitiveness, why would people concede that they believe in what the uneducated, God-fearing medieval peasant once did?. Following Ben Mears and his little cohort of believers, you find yourself completely wrapped up in the impending doom, the hopelessness and loss within the story. Midway through the book I also watched the first film adaptation of 'Salem's Lot which was fun (some excellent '70s fashion and hair to enjoy) but just reminded me of the fantastic depth of this book. As well as the main course, the meat of the tale, I particularly relished the shorter epistolary chapters at the end, exploring the earlier history of the town and its notable families, dating back to the 1700s. This is clearly a true classic of the genre and an immediate favourite of mine. Read it, if you haven't already!

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