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Judging the accuracy of multicultural historical fiction

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Article in a professional journal.


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Article in a professional journal.

2 review for Judging the accuracy of multicultural historical fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie_bam

    Read, Sylvia. Judging the accuracy of multicultural historical fiction: Guidelines for teachers. The Dragon Lode. Pages 13-19. Vol. 25, No. 2. Spring 2007. This article sought to educate educators about how to judge the accuracy of multicultural fiction. The author does this in two ways. First, she shows the reader how she judges the accuracy of multicultural fiction using two different books as examples. Next, she lays out the groundrules for teachers. The first book she reviews is Ann Rinaldi's, Read, Sylvia. Judging the accuracy of multicultural historical fiction: Guidelines for teachers. The Dragon Lode. Pages 13-19. Vol. 25, No. 2. Spring 2007. This article sought to educate educators about how to judge the accuracy of multicultural fiction. The author does this in two ways. First, she shows the reader how she judges the accuracy of multicultural fiction using two different books as examples. Next, she lays out the groundrules for teachers. The first book she reviews is Ann Rinaldi's, My Heart is on the Ground: The Diary of Nannie Little Rose. This is a book about a Lakota Sioux girl who goes away to a boarding school and gets "Americanized". At first the book seems charming and most teachers would agree to use it in class. Rinaldi also claims to have done research on this topic. It seems trustworthy. Then Read uses a clever tactic called, "Amazon.com reader reviews" to get the truth from readers who share the culture of the main character of the book. It turns out that there are inaccuracies and the readers are offended. The same thing happens with the next book Read reviews. All seems well until she checks the amazon.com reader reviews. The suggestions Read gives to teachers is to read the book's notes, looking for evidence that the book's author has done research on the topic, then check for criticisms of the book on amazon.com. Next, Read suggests that teachers go to websites that critique books about specific cultures, by those specific cultures, and then reading books actually written by members of the book's character's culture. This article had helpful advice for selecting books dealing with multicultural issues. It was particularly eye-opening to see the actual reader reviews and the "this is how it really was" stories they share. The reader/expert reviews reminded me of the discussion my group had about the book, Rules. Mariana's friend, an AI teacher, hated it because, as an expert, she could pick out so many inaccuracies. It makes sense, though, that when a topic is dear and personal to you, that you would take extreme notice of what people say or write about it, especially if they try to pass it off with any authority.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

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