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Time's Children

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A time traveler trapped in a violent past must protect the orphaned child of a murdered sovereign and find a way home, in this astonishing epic fantasy novel. Fifteen year-old Tobias Doljan, a Walker trained to travel through time, is called to serve at the court of Daerjen. The sovereign, Mearlan IV, wants him to Walk back fourteen years, to prevent a devastating war which A time traveler trapped in a violent past must protect the orphaned child of a murdered sovereign and find a way home, in this astonishing epic fantasy novel. Fifteen year-old Tobias Doljan, a Walker trained to travel through time, is called to serve at the court of Daerjen. The sovereign, Mearlan IV, wants him to Walk back fourteen years, to prevent a devastating war which will destroy all of Islevale. Even though the journey will double Tobias' age, he agrees. But he arrives to discover Mearlan has already been assassinated, and his court destroyed. The only survivor is the infant princess, Sofya. Still a boy inside his newly adult body, Tobias must find a way to protect the princess from assassins, and build himself a future... in the past. File Under: Fantasy [ Time Demons They See Me Walkin' Young Inside Disturbing Allies ]


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A time traveler trapped in a violent past must protect the orphaned child of a murdered sovereign and find a way home, in this astonishing epic fantasy novel. Fifteen year-old Tobias Doljan, a Walker trained to travel through time, is called to serve at the court of Daerjen. The sovereign, Mearlan IV, wants him to Walk back fourteen years, to prevent a devastating war which A time traveler trapped in a violent past must protect the orphaned child of a murdered sovereign and find a way home, in this astonishing epic fantasy novel. Fifteen year-old Tobias Doljan, a Walker trained to travel through time, is called to serve at the court of Daerjen. The sovereign, Mearlan IV, wants him to Walk back fourteen years, to prevent a devastating war which will destroy all of Islevale. Even though the journey will double Tobias' age, he agrees. But he arrives to discover Mearlan has already been assassinated, and his court destroyed. The only survivor is the infant princess, Sofya. Still a boy inside his newly adult body, Tobias must find a way to protect the princess from assassins, and build himself a future... in the past. File Under: Fantasy [ Time Demons They See Me Walkin' Young Inside Disturbing Allies ]

30 review for Time's Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    I've never read the author's other works but that doesn't really matter here. I was caught by the description alone. It's a high-fantasy time-travel novel! Yup. So we have all the goodies of messed up timelines, time-walkers, and similar time/space practitioners in a magic rule system seated in a heavily world-built fantasy world! All the benefits of a kingdom built from scratch AND the breaking of it several times during different periods of its history! Yay! And I wasn't disappointed in the text I've never read the author's other works but that doesn't really matter here. I was caught by the description alone. It's a high-fantasy time-travel novel! Yup. So we have all the goodies of messed up timelines, time-walkers, and similar time/space practitioners in a magic rule system seated in a heavily world-built fantasy world! All the benefits of a kingdom built from scratch AND the breaking of it several times during different periods of its history! Yay! And I wasn't disappointed in the text, either. It starts great with a kid on his effective journeyman quest, only when he's asked to break the rules, we're slapped in the face with the consequences of this particular magic. Every day you go back in time ages you in direct proportion. A fifteen-year-old going back in time by 14 years will have lost half his life in a single jump. Ouch. I can easily recommend this to fans of either Epic Fantasy or Time Travel SF. It combines the best of both worlds and with all the assassins, intrigue, and even love going on here, the novel entertains very roundly indeed. Officially it could be classified as a "saving the baby" tale, but because we keep seeing the timeline change in future and the kingdom change with it, it gets very interesting. My only complaint? The ending is only mildly satisfying. I'm not sure if it's meant to be a series or a single novel, but if it's a single novel, then I kind of wish it came with a more kickin' ending. Otherwise, I really enjoyed the beginning and the core. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Marta Cox

    I’ve never read anything by this author before but was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. It’s actually the second time travel story that I’ve read recently but this is far from the standard sci fi or paranormal fare and is actually a fantasy piece. Essentially we have three types of what’s known as Walkers and some can travel distance, others can even penetrate through objects and the rarest of all can move through time. They all have innate abilities but use golden devises bound with magi I’ve never read anything by this author before but was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. It’s actually the second time travel story that I’ve read recently but this is far from the standard sci fi or paranormal fare and is actually a fantasy piece. Essentially we have three types of what’s known as Walkers and some can travel distance, others can even penetrate through objects and the rarest of all can move through time. They all have innate abilities but use golden devises bound with magic to harness and direct their passage so a little like a certain device imagined by J K Rowling. Tobias is our fifteen year old hero and he’s sent to aid a ruler of a distant land at war. Here is where I struggled with the concept and ramifications of this storyline. In order for Tobias to walk back in time just one hour he has to sacrifice an equal part of his lifespan meaning he would age one hour there and another to return. Ok perhaps not exactly terrible you might say but Tobias is asked to travel fourteen years back in time effectively ageing him from fifteen to twenty nine ! Plus when he gets there the all too trusting and strangely loyal Tobias discovers something has changed time leaving him far from home and quite literally holding the baby ! I found this a little slow initially and I struggled to connect with Tobias or understand his motives. This man child willingly gives up a huge chunk of his life for a kingdom he knows nothing of. Plus if he were to return to his own time it would add more age to his body effectively making him forty two. Now luckily the author took his readers away from that horrific thought and gave us viewpoints from characters connected with Tobias which greatly opened up the world building and brought humanity. At times I found this a painful read and yes I admit I developed great sympathy for Tobias but luckily the ending left this reader satisfied and hoping that the next instalment won’t be too far away. This voluntary take is of a copy I requested from Netgalley and my thoughts and comments are honest and I believe fair

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kit (Metaphors and Moonlight)

    3.5 Stars Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body, stuck 14 years in the past, trying to keep a baby safe and change the future for the better. That was a premise that caught my attention. It's unique and intriguing but also very heavy and sad when you realize that no one, especially a teenager, should have to sacrifice that much or have that much responsibility put on their shoulders. But I'm getting ahead of 3.5 Stars Review: *I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.* A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body, stuck 14 years in the past, trying to keep a baby safe and change the future for the better. That was a premise that caught my attention. It's unique and intriguing but also very heavy and sad when you realize that no one, especially a teenager, should have to sacrifice that much or have that much responsibility put on their shoulders. But I'm getting ahead of myself. I think this is a good time for some lists! Things I Disliked: - The book was a little too slow-paced for my taste. - There were a lot of descriptions of settings (rooms, cities, buildings). - There were multiple POVs, and I liked some more than others. But the various POVs did give the book a slightly more epic feel with a wider scope, without going overboard, so that's something some readers may like. - This is not my preferred version of time travel---the kind where characters are actually able to change the outcome of the future. However, I accepted that as the premise of the book going in, so I can't really complain about that. Things I Liked: - The creativity of the Walkers, Crossers, and Spanners. Walkers can walk back in time. Crossers can pass through wood or stone. Spanners can teleport over distances. But they all require training and the proper tools, and there are rules and limits and sometimes consequences (like how Walkers age whatever amount of time they travel, both when they go back in time and when they go forward to get back to the present). - The creativity of the whole premise. A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body getting stuck in the past and having to keep the princess, who's only a baby, safe, with assassins following close behind. - The main characters were good people who were trying to do the right thing, so they were easy to root for. - The heavy topics were handled with the seriousness they deserved. No teen should have to sacrifice as much as Tobias did, or take on as much responsibility as he did, and those things were not taken lightly or glossed over. This whole book had a heavy, serious feel to it. And the dark scenes, violence, etc. were written well. I feel like the author found the perfect balance of not being gratuitous in his descriptions of violence but not pulling any punches or sugar-coating things either. (Trigger Warning: *MILD SPOILER* (view spoiler)[There were some fairly explicit scenes of torture, but it was a brief section that could be skipped, I think, if need be. (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER*) - Interesting supernatural creatures. Like time demons that fed upon the years of life left in a person and loved riddles, and mist demons that loved song. - The writing flowed well. Other: - Just a heads up, since at the time of this review it's not stated on the Goodreads page, this is the first in a series (a trilogy, I believe). So this is only the beginning of the story for these characters. Overall As I said, this was a little slow-paced with a little too much description for my taste, but I still thought it was a good book. The writing and the creativity made this a worthwhile read that I think many fans of high fantasy, time travel, and fantasy/sci-fi mashups will like! Recommended For: Anyone who likes high fantasy worlds, time travel, slow-paced stories, heavy themes, and the unique premise of a teenager in an adult body. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth McLennan

    It's no secret that I love anything to do with time travel (Doctor Who anyone!) When I saw the synopsis of Time's Children, I knew that it would be a book that I loved and would just speed read through, and I did. Right from the opening salvo you are drawn into this world. The different types of magic Walkers, Spanners and Crossers encompass movement through time and space. This enables people with the talent to either walk through time, move through solid matter or cover great distances is a sma It's no secret that I love anything to do with time travel (Doctor Who anyone!) When I saw the synopsis of Time's Children, I knew that it would be a book that I loved and would just speed read through, and I did. Right from the opening salvo you are drawn into this world. The different types of magic Walkers, Spanners and Crossers encompass movement through time and space. This enables people with the talent to either walk through time, move through solid matter or cover great distances is a small period of time. While not a new type of magic in the fantasy world, it is used really well in this setting. Our main character Tobias, is a Walker able to move through time. This is a rarer talent in his time and makes him very popular. At only fifteen he is sent to work at a far court , to do that rulers bidding. This move sets into motion a chain of events that will change the past and the future. The consequences of walking through time means that the amount of time you've walked is added to your age. Tobias walks back 14 years which ages him 14 years, making him a boy in a man's body. The writing and world building in this novel is fantastic. I loved the way everything is described and the way you don't get all the information at once. I also really liked how it cut from Tobias in the past to our main supporting character Mara, in the future. This shows us what has changed and makes you wonder just what Tobias has done in the past to change it. I'm really looking forward to the next in the series, and while it didn't end on a cliffhanger, there was enough tension that I would have just kept on reading! I've given Time's Children 4.5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

    Loved the world building, in particular the interesting magic with devastating consequences and the chilling demons that you learn to love. Enjoyed the various viewpoint characters and was pleasantly surprised to see one or two when their plot arcs began. The ending was not what I was expecting, but sets up nicely for a thrilling sequel. I haven't read many time travel stories, and I certainly haven't seen much of it in fantasy. But I really enjoyed this novel and look forward to Time's Demon nex Loved the world building, in particular the interesting magic with devastating consequences and the chilling demons that you learn to love. Enjoyed the various viewpoint characters and was pleasantly surprised to see one or two when their plot arcs began. The ending was not what I was expecting, but sets up nicely for a thrilling sequel. I haven't read many time travel stories, and I certainly haven't seen much of it in fantasy. But I really enjoyed this novel and look forward to Time's Demon next year.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hélène Louise

    What an excellent surprise! Time’s Children was an excellent read, intelligent, original and thorough. The book is rather long, but doesn’t show, the reading is always easy and satisfying, quite enjoyable. I really like reading fantasy stories but can be easily disappointed. I love personality and good writing, but can’t stand thoroughly longish sadistic descriptions, so frequently used to create some kind of dramatic? serious? adult? atmosphere. Young adult fantasy can be great but is often (and What an excellent surprise! Time’s Children was an excellent read, intelligent, original and thorough. The book is rather long, but doesn’t show, the reading is always easy and satisfying, quite enjoyable. I really like reading fantasy stories but can be easily disappointed. I love personality and good writing, but can’t stand thoroughly longish sadistic descriptions, so frequently used to create some kind of dramatic? serious? adult? atmosphere. Young adult fantasy can be great but is often (and more and more so I’m afraid) monotonous and stereotypical, cliched even. For these reasons I’m always really happy to read some good fantasy, which qualifies as « adult », but could be read by a teenager or a sensitive adult (who don’t care having over stressful readings, as l). For instance Brandon Sanderson’s or Patricia Briggs’ works do the trick for me! Some parts of their stories may be terrible, but their author never dwells unhealthily over them. Time’s children was perfect in this way. Tobias’ life isn’t easy and gets on being harder and harder! Still, I could read and appreciate the story comfortably (actually I skimmed through a very small passage, just one). Before starting this book you should know that it isn’t a stand alone. Not quite a surprise with this genre, for surem but never said explicitly (it seems the new fashion, I don’t appreciate this method much, to be honest). Probably a trilogy, who knows? Anyway, I was quite happy to read the book which was a lovely surprise! The main character, Tobias is very likeable; his choices speak for him. The narration was always logical, credible, Tobias’ decisions were always coherent regarding his background and personality. The magic was great: interesting and developed with a creditable rigour, which I applaud. Tobias’ magic makes possible for him to come back in the past (in a way rather similar as Hermiome’s Time Turner). But nothing is easy or comfortable, and the worst point is probably that each travel makes you older. If you come back a month ago, then come back to your own time, you’ll be two months older: this particular magic has a cost. I’m always reticent about time travel: thinking about it is always difficult, impossible even. Most stories over simplify or at the contrary over complicates the thematics. In Time’s Children, the idea was used with care, elaborating an uchronia along. Clever, entertaining and clear! An accomplishment. All in all the story is very enjoyable, with good characters, credible interactions and some very good ideas, as time demons and time magic. The end isn’t frustrating, the story has met a sensitive point, and can be suspended for a while. I’ll be really happy to read the sequel, which isn’t so frequent for me nowadays: even if I’ve liked a story, I rarely continue the series. A book must have personality, originality, and good writing, with endearing characters, to make me reading the sequel. To conclude « Time’s Children » is a solid, intelligent and over the top fantasy, which will, I hope, meet its readers! (I thank Netgalley and Angry Robot for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynn K : Grimmedian

    Both a portal and flintlock fantasy, Time’s Children creates an intricate world and an emotionally gripping story. Portal fantasies have long been a favorite and the time travel which is central to the story creates myriad plot loopholes which can be very difficult to write well, and D.B. Jackson does so with aplomb and great style. There are so many effects of each action that must be taken into account and so much additional detail to the plot that requires a well thought out story line. Obvio Both a portal and flintlock fantasy, Time’s Children creates an intricate world and an emotionally gripping story. Portal fantasies have long been a favorite and the time travel which is central to the story creates myriad plot loopholes which can be very difficult to write well, and D.B. Jackson does so with aplomb and great style. There are so many effects of each action that must be taken into account and so much additional detail to the plot that requires a well thought out story line. Obviously, D.B. Jackson is natural storyteller whose has devoted years to honing his craft. The easy readability of the book along with the gut-wrenching experiences of the characters create a riveting tale. Once begun, I found it extremely difficult to put down again and the story has been on my mind again and again since finishing. The characterizations are well done and will draw readers into their hopes and dreams as well as their worst fears. Even the enemies of the main characters are so well crafted as to have a sympathetic vein of their own. Time’s Children is also full of fantasy creatures based in myth and legend, and a few uniquely fascinating ones as well, like the Tirribin, child-like in appearance, ancient in years, they feed on the years of humans and are given a large role in the story. The terrifying Belvora, a huge bird-like creature that hunts humans only by order of a malevolent master and make an early appearance in this dark tale of desperation and lost time. The beautiful cover done by Jan Weßbecher is a breathtaking piece that I found myself admiring repeatedly as Tobias' story unfolded. The ability to Walk through time is rare talent. There are many more with abilities of spanning or crossing, but a time walker is much more rarely found. The experience of Walking and the constraints placed upon its use, due to its aging the Walker, are genuinely frightening. The rules in this magic system are quite clear. Those with the ability to span, moving instantaneously from one place to another, Crossers, who can move through solid matter, or the rare walker, the ability to travel in time, all who have been trained for since childhood for generations at Windhome keep. The best school of training Ilsevale, Windhome Palace has been Tobia’s home since he was five years old. He’s an excellent student and is not surprised to be ordered to the court at Hayncalde, in Daerjen. Before he can even set foot aboard a ship to leave, Tobias is being tracked and is in grave danger, the ripples of what he has yet to do already hot on his heels. This book doesn’t shy from detailed violence, giving the book a very dark theme. There are torture scenes which will leave you gasping with the character and weeping with him in despair. Time's Children is the first is a series of what is set to become three books. The ending of the first only solves the smallest of the problems Tobias faces and will leave you wanting the next installment immediately. Time’s Demon is slated for a May 2019 release by Angry Robot Books. Find more info, pics and author bio at Grimmedian.com

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cheyanne Lepka

    This book mixes time travel and fantasy seamlessly in a secondary world, and presents it in an impossible to put down package. The time travel in this book is top notch, never losing the fantasy feel, while still adding all the best time travel elements. My favourite twist is how when the walkers travel through time, they age the number of years they’ve travelled. This really ups the stakes for the characters, as they have a lot of lose by travelling so far into the past. The world-building is s This book mixes time travel and fantasy seamlessly in a secondary world, and presents it in an impossible to put down package. The time travel in this book is top notch, never losing the fantasy feel, while still adding all the best time travel elements. My favourite twist is how when the walkers travel through time, they age the number of years they’ve travelled. This really ups the stakes for the characters, as they have a lot of lose by travelling so far into the past. The world-building is spot-on, and the strength of it really comes through in the alternate timeline, where the reader gets to experience the changes that occur when Tobias changes the past. Add in time demons and it’s brilliant how the time travel magic is so entwined with the world-building. As far as characters go, I wasn’t much of a fan of Tobias, I just found him to be too much of your classic hero (not saying there’s anything wrong with that, but it just doesn’t do it for me as a reader). I did really enjoy Dröe and Mara, who I thought were really interesting characters (I’m not sure I completely buy some of Mara’s motives, but I found her to be a great character regardless). Overall, this is a great book, and I would highly recommend it to anyone who loves fantasy and loves time travel and wants to experience both at once.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy Hoodock

    Excellent!! I highly recommend it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    I picked this up kind of on a whim, as the cover and the story looked interesting. A time travel tale in a fantasy setting? I found the concept very interesting. The execution however left much to be desired. The book started well enough, introducing us to the world and the characters as Tobias heads out for his assignment. But when he arrives is when things take a bad turn. At first I thought this was the author’s first book, so I was willing to forgive some flaws. But since I discovered he’s wr I picked this up kind of on a whim, as the cover and the story looked interesting. A time travel tale in a fantasy setting? I found the concept very interesting. The execution however left much to be desired. The book started well enough, introducing us to the world and the characters as Tobias heads out for his assignment. But when he arrives is when things take a bad turn. At first I thought this was the author’s first book, so I was willing to forgive some flaws. But since I discovered he’s written more than 20 books, I can’t be so lenient. The characters don’t act realistic. The main character essentially throws his life away for a leader he’s hardly met, then proceeds to be incompetent at virtually everything he does. His only heroic quality is that he doesn’t quit. Meanwhile as a father I instantly realized his depiction of the child is completely unrealistic and far too simple and convenient for the story. Then the last half of the book or so spends much of its time going in circles, having things happen purely to advance the plot, and ends up accomplishing almost nothing. Near the end of the book I discovered, to my disappointment, that nothing was going to be resolved and that this was basically the first half of the story. It just ends without a satisfying conclusion and demands that you read the second half of the duology to finish the story. As much time as I wasted on this book I just can’t imagine doing that. I thought this was YA for a while and could kind of understand some of the flaws. But now I’m not so sure and think this book just may be bad.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Will

    4.5 / 5 stars Originally reviewed on: https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com/ Time’s Children was one heck of an entertaining read—especially on the heels of another bit of time travel fiction—a time travel fantasy that was an interesting bit of genre-cross that I’d not experienced before. As always, Jackson’s writing is lovely; attaining a classic fantasy feel while painting a vividly colorful world full of deep and insightful characters. This is my 9th book by the author (4 as David B. Coe, 5 und 4.5 / 5 stars Originally reviewed on: https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com/ Time’s Children was one heck of an entertaining read—especially on the heels of another bit of time travel fiction—a time travel fantasy that was an interesting bit of genre-cross that I’d not experienced before. As always, Jackson’s writing is lovely; attaining a classic fantasy feel while painting a vividly colorful world full of deep and insightful characters. This is my 9th book by the author (4 as David B. Coe, 5 under the pseudonym D. B. Jackson) and I have to say, he hops around quite a bit between genres, doesn’t he? Time’s Children begins the Islevale Cycle, a fantasy world set upon a world of sea and islands, in which certain individuals—known as Travelers—combine their natural abilities and golden, specialized devices in order to cheat the natural order. Spanners use their sextants in order to traverse great distances in but an instant. Crossers use their apertures to move through solid matter. Walkers can move back and forth through time by means of a chronofor. Of these three, Walkers are the rarest and most sought after, due to their ability to change the course of events. Each of these powers comes with a price, however. Never did learn the weakness of Spanning. Huh. Crossers that encounter metal in their passage return with horrible injuries or can suffer death. And Walkers suffer the time they travel twice (meaning, if a Walker were to travel back a year, and then return, their body would have aged two years in that time: one year to go back, another to return). Tobias Doljan is a Walker, training at the Traveler’s Palace in the north sea. Days before his 15th birthday, he is summoned to the court of Mearlan IV, ruler of Daerjen. Leaving his home for court is a daunting task, but one Tobias is excited about. Yet in doing so he gives up much. The camaraderie of his peers, or anyone his age. An interesting friend—a Tirribin, a time demon, which preys upon humans’ years in order to live (if you’ve seen any Stargate Atlantis, they’re pretty much the wraith, except in the bodies of children). And budding love in the form of another initiate, Mara. And yet Tobias is excited for court life. More than excited, even. It’s something he’s been working his whole life for. And yet, within days of reaching Daerjen, it might all be over. Daerjen is in the middle of a war, a war that isn’t going well. The monarch has exhausted all his options—all, but one. Something only a Walker might do. For if he can travel back, Tobias can prevent the war altogether. But there is a huge problem. Due to the very nature of Walking, the toll it inflicts on Walkers, the Traveler’s Palace limits the length of time Walkers are to travel to no more than two years. Any more, and the Walkers are told to refuse their employer, that the contract is voided, and to return home. And yet Mearlan asks anyway. He asks Tobias not to go back one or two, but fourteen years. This establishes an interesting (if horrifying) concept. Should Tobias Walk (Spoilers: of course he does) he would essentially triple in age by the time he returns home. He’d be a 15-year old boy, stuck in the body of a 43-year old man. That’s just… ludicrous. And yet, to prevent a war, Tobias acquiesces. And yet, after his Walk back, nothing goes to plan. Mearlan is assassinated along with all his court, Tobias’s chronofor is destroyed, and Tobias is forced to flee with the last of the monarch’s kin—his infant daughter, Sofya. The premise of this book was what first caught my attention. I mean, Tobias coming to terms with the fact that he’s doubled in age, that he’s a boy in the body of a man—is fascinating. And horrifying. Not to mention that he now must caring for an infant. Not to mention that she’s the sole heir to the throne. And that everyone in this new time is hunting for them. And that Tobias can’t return to his old (um, future) time. And it’s how he handles it that makes Time’s Children completely worth reading. My favorite part of this book was actually his dealings with Sofya. The Sovereign’s daughter was 16 when Tobias first met her, but it’s the 2-year old princess that steals the show. Because she acts like a two-year old. She lives, she laughs, she loves—and she poops. Plus, she can’t talk. And she doesn’t understand a good many things that are happening. I figured she’d be little more than a prop in baby-form. And I was wrong. And that’s just awesome. I did have a couple issues with Time’s Children. One was a lot later in the story, so as not to spoil anything… I’m just going to say it involved time paradoxes, and the decision of when and when not to travel back. The other, actually, is the first chapter. More specifically, what happens in it, and what doesn’t happen in the rest of the book. I hate it when a book gives us a teaser about something that will happen later on, but then doesn’t ever get to that point. Now, I assume that this scene—where someone, presumably Tobias, is back trying to prevent the war or assassination or something—will occur later in the series. Or, is supposed to. But I don’t KNOW that. And unless David B. Coe has FINISHED writing all the other Islevale books, HE can’t know that either. Sometimes, a scene like this will get edited out. Sometimes, the story will simply move in a different direction. A lot of things can happen. Too bad too; I kept expecting the point to crop up and was disappointed when I reached the end and it hadn’t. All in all, Time’s Children is an excellent read, providing a new and unique premise then proceeding to execute it well. The characters stole the show for me; the character arcs and growth, but especially the interactions between Tobias and baby Sofya made this a book I could not put down. And while an unsatisfying conclusion held it back from being a solid 5 stars, Time’s Children is a must read—and one of the best books I’ve read so far this year. Its sequel, Time’s Demon, comes out on May 28, 2019.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    The Islevale Cycle by D.B. Jackson delivers a gripping, well-paced fantasy adventure with compelling characters and a unique magic system. Time's Children (book one) hooked me with its drastic magic costs, the inclusion of small children, and demons that are truly "other." D. B. Jackson takes time travel to the next level by exacting daunting costs for those who Walk through time, giving his magic system a unique feel, and keeping his human characters grounded, relatable in their struggle to outw The Islevale Cycle by D.B. Jackson delivers a gripping, well-paced fantasy adventure with compelling characters and a unique magic system. Time's Children (book one) hooked me with its drastic magic costs, the inclusion of small children, and demons that are truly "other." D. B. Jackson takes time travel to the next level by exacting daunting costs for those who Walk through time, giving his magic system a unique feel, and keeping his human characters grounded, relatable in their struggle to outwit high odds with limited resources. And did I mention that there's a baby? Children are naturally left out of most adventure fantasy because they're fragile and can't stick it to the antagonist. With Islevale's themes of maturity, love, and family, including a child works excellently. In book two, Time's Demon, time demon Droë brings her own layer of complexity to these themes with her child-like appearance and her almost-love fascination with human Walker Tobias, who is actually 15 but now appears older and finds himself taking care of a baby. In following these themes, the Islevale Cycle includes NSFW scenes of nakedness, and scenes portraying sex, without delving into explicit erotica. Genre-wise, characters become couples or wish to become so, but the series starts with a heavy dose of adventure that drives the plot apart from romance. Sex and violence are all handled well and definitely not just for shock value. It's an adult-audience series with complex, adult views on humanity and love. Speaking of Droë, I don't want to spoil too much, so let's just say that the demons in the Islevale Cycle give off a spine-shivering sense of "other," as one tends to do when one's sustenance is literally the years stolen from human lives. And while time demons appear humanoid, one demon type is literally a mist cloud and figures wonderfully into sailor's lore. And, of course, where there are pirates, there are also beautiful, enigmatic sea demons. Readers who enjoy fae in fiction but crave something new will love D.B. Jackson's unique demon classes. Also, there are pirates! D. B. Jackson shows a wide range of lifestyles as his characters cross vast distances in a complex world, with a mind for how age and gender effects experiences. We start in a school for young mages but soon visit castles, pirate ships, port towns, and seaside slums, and all the nooks and crannies of human existence that those imply. There's also a bit of political intrigue, as politics underpin why Tobias Walks back in time in the first place, and how he ends up with a baby. I prefer character-driven stories, so I was pleased with how all the politics and cool magic feeds directly into character motivations. This might sound a little strange, but I love how nice and considerate the characters are to each other. (Uh, to their friends. You know. The ones they're not murdering or getting murdered by?) The dialogue feels real and I quite enjoy the considerate attitude of POV characters for their loved ones. There are high stakes a-plenty, but characters also talk to each other like you would hope a friend would talk to you if your lives were in danger. This not only contrasts well with the demons, who are a step removed from human emotion and the workings of human relationships, but also provides depth for conflict between the antagonists and the protagonists. Without sacrificing a sense of right and wrong, D. B. Jackson shows how characters like Droë set on their paths, how they, too, fight from a sense of something good to pursue or protect. Pick up the D. B. Jackson's Islevale Cycle and let Tobias and Droë take you on an epic fantasy adventure full of time travel, demons, and the harried pursuit of life, liberty, and love:

  13. 4 out of 5

    K.T.

    I’ve been a fan of D.B. Jackson’s books (aka David B. Coe) for a long time and have read many of his books. A long time ago, I emailed him when reading the Winds of the Forelands series after finishing the Lon Tobyn Chronicles. I had been impressed with the way he wove the tale in such a way that I could completely empathize with the antagonists of the novels, even though I disagreed with their methods. Powerful stuff and I admired his skill in getting into the heads of all his characters so wel I’ve been a fan of D.B. Jackson’s books (aka David B. Coe) for a long time and have read many of his books. A long time ago, I emailed him when reading the Winds of the Forelands series after finishing the Lon Tobyn Chronicles. I had been impressed with the way he wove the tale in such a way that I could completely empathize with the antagonists of the novels, even though I disagreed with their methods. Powerful stuff and I admired his skill in getting into the heads of all his characters so well. Fast forward, 15 or so years later, and I just finished Time’s Children, book 1 of the Islevale Cycle. I tore through this book. From a technical standpoint, the writing is impeccable. Jackson’s writing has only improved over time and I’m struck how he continues to draw me into the worlds he creates. The narrative flow is so smooth and natural as we move back in time and switch between character points of view. I never felt like the story was disjointed or the transitions were jarring. The story itself is original and intriguing. I like time travel stories to begin with, but in this story, when a character moves in time, a Walker, he or she ages based on how far back they traveled. Go back a year, you’re a year older when reach the past and a year older when you come back to the future. Oh yeah, plus you can’t take anything with you (exception: your time travel device) – no weapons, no information except what’s in your head, and no clothes. The world also contains Spanners – those who can travel space in a blink of an eye and those who can Cross through matter. Luckily, no aging is involved, but still no clothing either. Fifteen-year-old Tobias Doljan is sent from the training academy on Windhome to the Royal Courts in Daerjen where he is asked to make the greatest sacrifice – a 14-year walk back in time to stop a disastrous war. No Walker is ever asked to go on such a dangerous and ultimately heartbreaking walk in time but Tobias agrees. In the past, he finds things very different from what he expected and soon he is on the run with a most precious cargo. Mara, his friend from the current time, whose life has also been upended in ways no one could foresee with Tobias’s walk back in time, joins him as they try to save the last remaining royal family member from Daerjen and set time right. Pursued by assassins and a time “demon” who may or may not be in love with Tobias, this first book had me on edge because I really loved the characters and I cared about what happened to them. They understood, and we understood, both the seriousness of their situations and decisions, and I also could relate to some of more trivial aspects (when weighed against the fate of nations) of their decisions. Even the non-human characters are brought to life, especially Droe, the time demon who may be in love with Tobias. Another aspect to the books that I really dug was the fact that there were consequences. I’ve already mentioned the aging when a Walker goes back in time, but there are other instances. Call upon a demon and you better be willing to pay a price – with time from a life, or a riddle (but it needs to be a good one). Decisions have long-reaching consequences as well as we see from the results of Tobias’s timewalk, as well as Mara’s. BTW, there are several scenes told through an antagonist’s POV and, although you’re rooting for Tobias, these antagonists feel just as real, just rounded, as the protagonists. Jackson’s skills have only cemented his place as a great storyteller.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 4.0 of 5 Mearlan IV, the ruler of Daerjen is looking to add a Walker to his retinue. That Walker is 15 year old Tobias Doljan. A Walker is someone with thew ability and training to walk backward and forward in time - usually to give important messages to someone to watch out or be careful about something. And of course a ruler such as Mearlan wants to make sure he has a Walker to warn him about dangers. But Mearlan has a job for T This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 4.0 of 5 Mearlan IV, the ruler of Daerjen is looking to add a Walker to his retinue. That Walker is 15 year old Tobias Doljan. A Walker is someone with thew ability and training to walk backward and forward in time - usually to give important messages to someone to watch out or be careful about something. And of course a ruler such as Mearlan wants to make sure he has a Walker to warn him about dangers. But Mearlan has a job for Tobias - an unusual request and one that he won't repeat. Mearlan wants Tobias to go back and tell the younger Mearlan not to start the war that he's currently in and losing. There's an important side-effect to Walking through time. The body ages with the amount of time Walked. If a Walker goes backward one day, he ages a day, and if he goes forward one day, to the time he initially left, he ages another day, even though no one else has aged. Mearlan IV has asked Tobias to Walk backward 14 years, to an integral point before the war starts. Of course Tobias, who will be 29 in body and 15 in mind, will have to try to find a way to convince Mearlan that he was sent by his older self. But along the way, assassins are trying to take out Tobias, and disasters occur that suggest the future will be changed in some very unexpected ways. Tobias may be the only one who can salvage or resurrect the future the way it's supposed to happen. I've read a few time-travel books and they're always pretty confounding, but author D.B. Jackson has done a pretty remarkable job of making sense of the vagaries of time travel. I do like the addition of aging, which does put some limits on how far backward or forward someone can travel. The story is greatly interesting right at the start as we get settled in to this world and the beginning of Tobias' quest. As the action picks up I lost interest in some of the story. Things change drastically, and the changes keep coming for a bit, and at some point it is just a little too much. It settles back down (if action chases can be considered 'settles down') and we return to story-telling over action sequences which is much more interesting. The book is the first part of a series and as such, there are unanswered questions and an unresolved story-line when we get to the end of the book. I liked Jackson's writing, and the overall concept is quite intriguing. Jackson takes on a challenging theme with time travel, but he builds a story around it very well. But his story is much more interesting than his action sequences. Looking for a good book? Time's Children by D.B. Jackson is a clever fantasy and well-written. I look forward to the next book in the series. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Unfortunately, the author can't go back in time to correct the gaping plot holes and horrible decision making skills by the characters. Time travel is very tricky to get right. There are rules that you obey in your story...I'm ok if you make those rules up (like aging...I thought this was an interesting twist), but I'm absolutely not OK if you change those rule just to fit a convenient narrative. The synopsis of the book sounded very interesting, and I enjoy the way the author writes. I like havi Unfortunately, the author can't go back in time to correct the gaping plot holes and horrible decision making skills by the characters. Time travel is very tricky to get right. There are rules that you obey in your story...I'm ok if you make those rules up (like aging...I thought this was an interesting twist), but I'm absolutely not OK if you change those rule just to fit a convenient narrative. The synopsis of the book sounded very interesting, and I enjoy the way the author writes. I like having things dangled in front of me and then explained later. It makes me pay more attention. I did like that part of the book. However, if you spend one minute...rather one SECOND thinking about this book...you will realize how poorly constructed it is. :::::::::SPOILERS BELOW::::::::: If Tobias is a time-traveler...why did he not just go back in time and prevent his mentor from being killed on the docks by the demon? The book pivots around a baby princess who Tobias rescues and protects. Why?!?! Shouldn't his main objective have been to run away, find a new chronofor and go back in time to warn about the impending assassins???? He endures torture and stress for ABSOLUTLY NO REASON. Speaking of torture...why didn't he summon the time demons to help him? Why did he wait until he had been rescued and was finally trying to escape the city? He would have been willing to do anything to get out of torture...he should have thought of this. Terrible...I'm sorry. Mara and Tobias overpower the traitor binder, Filt Bexler. They talk about it, but don't bother to look for a tri-sextant or any other device. They could have simply traveled together to escape. Or, you know, gone back in time to solve the problem. This kind of stuff drove me crazy the entire time I read the book. I kept hoping that there would be some sort of reason that he didn't think to solve his problems using the powers that he possessed. I almost died while reading when the assassins (husband and wife..can't remember their names) are talking and the wife asks the husband why Tobias didn't just go back in time to fix the problem. She even says, "It's what I would do." ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!! The author even thought of it, but didn't bother to have Tobias think of it? How is the character in a book smarter than the author!?! I can't blame the author for this one because most of the time the author does not have control of the artwork. It's true. Don't ask me why. Anyway....throughout the book, Tobias is called racial slurs because of his dark skin color. The dude on the front of the book doesn't look very dark skinned to me..... Just saying.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexia Cambaling

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review. I requested Time’s Children from Angry Robot Books on NetGalley partly because of its unique and interesting premise. Basically, a fifteen-year old boy travels fourteen years back in time. Doing so had some pretty interesting consequences for our character, Tobias. Basically, every time he travels through time, he ages. So, when he was sent on a mission to try and prevent a war fourteen years before the start of a war, he arrives looki I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review. I requested Time’s Children from Angry Robot Books on NetGalley partly because of its unique and interesting premise. Basically, a fifteen-year old boy travels fourteen years back in time. Doing so had some pretty interesting consequences for our character, Tobias. Basically, every time he travels through time, he ages. So, when he was sent on a mission to try and prevent a war fourteen years before the start of a war, he arrives looking like he’s in his late twenties. So basically, he gets stuck in the past in an adult body despite having the mentality of a fifteen-year old boy. Not something anyone would be keen to experience. First up, as usual, the worldbuilding. I really enjoyed the worldbuilding in Time’s Children. Basically, the magic users here use the aid of certain magical devices in order to access their abilities. There are those who can travel through time, those who can travel great distances, and even those who can create such devices. There are clear limitations to the usage of such devices and capabilities which I really appreciate. I think that having these clear limitations allow the world to be more believable. Of course, having people researching ways to circumvent these limitations also make for a more believable world. In addition to that, the royal assassination that happens when he goes back also had clear implications for what happens in the future. I liked that the future basically changed drastically because of it and that we actually got to see it change. It was a very tangible way of seeing that yes, this world has consequences. What the character does is very vital and we actually see how it changes the future world that they have. How it was woven into the story through the eyes of another character was also very interesting. As for the characters, I really liked Tobias as a protagonist. He starts off being really excited to be posted to a royal court and while he is pretty young, he also happened to be rather responsible. He understands the importance of his position and he goes along with this insane plan because he understands the implications of it. Unfortunately for him, things don’t work out as expected and he becomes stuck in the past. I really enjoyed how this was portrayed because Tobias was really forced to grow up quickly especially since he has to take care of the princess. The bits where he has to fight to keep the both of them alive and out of danger has got to be some of my favorite parts of the book. I’m really excited to see where his story goes and how he basically deals with his situation. Mara is also another interesting character because we see her in the first few chapters and at first, she’s just a side character. Someone who Tobias might regret leaving. Then, as the change in the timeline happens, she forgets about him but senses that something is wrong so she enlists’ Droe’s- a sort of time demon- help. She does eventually figure it out but what happens while she’s discovering all of these things is also interesting. She lived an entirely different life than what we were originally shown and we did see how the world changed through her eyes. I felt like the way it happened was very natural and it flows rather well. The plot is fairly fast-paced and I read through it in like a day or so. It’s also pretty fun and rather well-written. For me, the best part of the book is really the interesting world and the premise. The ending leaves me with some questions for what happens next and I’m really excited to see that. That said, I can definitely see myself reading the next one because I do want to see what happens next. This review is also on The Bookworm Daydreamer

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    3.5 stars. I have such mixed feelings about this book, and I wish I didn't. On the one hand, for a book as long as it is, it is extremely readable. The flow is great. The characters are engaging, and though the point of view jumps around some there was no instance where I went "Ugh, them again. Can't we get back to (more interesting character)?" The most active antagonist is developed enough that we feel some sympathy for him even as we dislike the choices he's making, which I felt was a slight w 3.5 stars. I have such mixed feelings about this book, and I wish I didn't. On the one hand, for a book as long as it is, it is extremely readable. The flow is great. The characters are engaging, and though the point of view jumps around some there was no instance where I went "Ugh, them again. Can't we get back to (more interesting character)?" The most active antagonist is developed enough that we feel some sympathy for him even as we dislike the choices he's making, which I felt was a slight weakness of Jackson's Thieftaker Chronicles books that he has corrected here. And as much as there is going on--not only are we in a fantasy realm so there is a ton of complex worldbuilding to do, but since time travel is a major plot element there are also two different timelines to keep track of, which means there are multiple versions of several characters to keep straight in addition to concerns of geography and magical rules and so on--I never said "Wait, what's going on? Where are we? Who is this again?" And I was very intrigued by the conceit of time travel where if you go back or forward, you age by that amount, so our two lead protagonists are fifteen mentally but by the time they end the book they're thirty physically. Pulling all of this off into something so readable is quite a feat and very impressive. My biggest problem is that now that I'm done I have a certain amount of fatigue looking ahead, because as good as this was, the entire book felt like nothing but setup. This is just the first little bit of a big story with an unknown number of future installments (at least two more beyond this one at the time of this writing, Time's Demon and Time's Assassins). So by the time we get to the end of this fairly lengthy book, pretty much nothing is resolved, everything has just fallen into place so the real adventure can begin. But that's a problem with my preferences for storytelling, and may not bother or might even be a plus for someone else. Just be aware when you start that you're in for the long haul. I will be keeping an eye on this series and may pick it back up again once there is a conclusion in sight.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Disclaimer: I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an un-biased review. I’ve loved a good time travel story since the old days when I saw a double header of Back to the Future and Pee Wee’s Big Adventure at a drive in movie theater. Yes … I am old. (ha!) I loved the twisty-turny way it made my brain feel. What if Marty met himself? What if his parents figured out who he was. What if someone died and it eliminated his timeline? Time travel can be tricky! Time’s Children is not afra Disclaimer: I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an un-biased review. I’ve loved a good time travel story since the old days when I saw a double header of Back to the Future and Pee Wee’s Big Adventure at a drive in movie theater. Yes … I am old. (ha!) I loved the twisty-turny way it made my brain feel. What if Marty met himself? What if his parents figured out who he was. What if someone died and it eliminated his timeline? Time travel can be tricky! Time’s Children is not afraid to meet these questions head on. Tobias is a young man with an innate ability to “time walk” with the use of a Chronofor. He is 15 years old and has been trained primarily as an assassin. He will be employed by the king of an embattled kingdom, who hopes to use Tobias’ abilities to prevent the war. Time travel in this book ages a person. For every year you walk … you age. Tobias takes a walk 14 years into the past and emerges to find himself a 15 year old mind in a 29 year old body. This creates an interesting character arc. His body is different, he’s not been slowly habituated to the slow aches and pains of growing up and older. He’s a boy in a man’s body, still idealistic and I think a little tenderhearted. However, his walk has now changed history in ways that couldn’t have been foreseen and now he is stuck. I don’t want to say more because SPOILERS. I quite liked the book and the authors style of writing. It put me in mind of Jeff Wheeler’s books. They are easy to sink into. As a trigger warning, there is some off-focus torture in the book. I say off-focus because it is not dwelt on in grisly detail, but the effect and emotion is kept intact. I’m not sure exactly how many books are going to be in this series, but I know that there is a second book coming out relatively soon. I’m hoping I can come across it on Netgalley in the near future. I’d really like to see how this story shapes up. Song for this book: What Time Do You Call This? by Elbow

  19. 5 out of 5

    John Purvis

    "Time's Children" eBook was published in 2018 and was written by D. B. Jackson (http://www.dbjackson-author.com). Mr. Jackson has published six novels. This is the first of his "Islevale Cycle" series.  I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘R’ because it contains scenes of Violence and Mature Situations. The story is set in another world where magic is possible. The primary character is fifteen-year-ol "Time's Children" eBook was published in 2018 and was written by D. B. Jackson (http://www.dbjackson-author.com). Mr. Jackson has published six novels. This is the first of his "Islevale Cycle" series.  I received an ARC of this novel through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this novel as ‘R’ because it contains scenes of Violence and Mature Situations. The story is set in another world where magic is possible. The primary character is fifteen-year-old Tobias Doljan.  Doljan is a student of magic with a specialty as a Walker who can travel through time. He is sent to the court of Daerjen. The sovereign of Daerjen, Mearlan IV, asks him to Walk back in time fourteen years, far beyond what is normally allowed. Doljan agrees to take the risk and the burden of aging himself fourteen years in order to stop the war that has been going on.  Doljan survives the trip back in time, but Mearlan and his court are unexpectedly attacked and killed. The only survivor is Doljan and Mearlan's baby girl. Doljan, though only fifteen in the body of a thirty-year-old man, must find a way to save the princess and evade the invaders.  Doljan's close friend and love from the magic school, Mara, senses the disruption in the timeline when Mearlan is killed in the past. Though she has forgotten who Doljan is, she knows she must follow him into the past to correct the change in history.  Plots that span time. Magical creatures. Threats from foreign powers. This has the making of a great fantasy series.  I thoroughly enjoyed the nearly 13 hours I spent reading this 528-page fantasy. I liked the plot and the characters. I think the twist of aging those who travel through time adds to the story. I like the cover art. I give this novel a 5 out of 5. Further book reviews I have written can be accessed at https://johnpurvis.wordpress.com/blog/. 

  20. 4 out of 5

    astaliegurec

    Unfortunately, I had to quit at the 60% point of D.B. Jackson's 2018 novel "Islevale, Book 1: Time's Children" because of a torture scene. Adding to the problem with the torture, itself, is the fact that all the protagonists in the book are, with some qualifications, youths (about 16 years old). Up to that point in the book, I was fairly impressed with the story, characters and writing. Of course, I did have severe problems with the entire basis of the book: magical time travel. Jackson got it e Unfortunately, I had to quit at the 60% point of D.B. Jackson's 2018 novel "Islevale, Book 1: Time's Children" because of a torture scene. Adding to the problem with the torture, itself, is the fact that all the protagonists in the book are, with some qualifications, youths (about 16 years old). Up to that point in the book, I was fairly impressed with the story, characters and writing. Of course, I did have severe problems with the entire basis of the book: magical time travel. Jackson got it entirely wrong (ability to change a single time stream regardless of time loops and paradoxes), using a poor mechanic to implement it (sextant-type devices), with another device that horribly unbalances it, and ages time travelers based on how many years they travel forward or back. For the writing, I'd have gone with 4 stars. Because of the time-travel problems, I'd have settled for 3 stars. But, with the torture, I'm going with a Pretty Bad 2 stars out of 5 and quitting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maxine Robinson

    A great read. I've had a hard time trying to articulate exactly what I thought made this book special. It's quite unassuming. It was a book that I found myself willing to put down at night, not because it was bad or I was bored, but because I wanted it to last as long as possible. I savoured it, I enjoyed the writing and the characters and I didn't want to rush it. It was almost a heavy read, a book that made you feel for Tobias and his struggle. Tobias is a wonderful character. He is devoted to h A great read. I've had a hard time trying to articulate exactly what I thought made this book special. It's quite unassuming. It was a book that I found myself willing to put down at night, not because it was bad or I was bored, but because I wanted it to last as long as possible. I savoured it, I enjoyed the writing and the characters and I didn't want to rush it. It was almost a heavy read, a book that made you feel for Tobias and his struggle. Tobias is a wonderful character. He is devoted to his job, he is willing to take risks, he does his best to do the right thing. After travelling back in time he finds himself in a 29 year olds body. He takes on the mammoth task of trying to single handily prevent a war and then when everything goes wrong, he takes on a baby and tries to escape. He has to find a way to fix everything while navigating a city he doesn't really know and with nobody who knows him. Tobias never complains, he continues trying to move forward. All of the characters felt distinct and you had to appreciate just how fierce the women in Time's Children are. Those on either side are capable, willing to face their fear and get things done, even at their own detriment. The magic revolved around time and movement. Walkers could travel through time, Spanners could travel distances and Crossers could move through solid matter. People with the talent were trained and needed specific objects to be able to use their magic. For walkers there was a heavy price for using the magic. There was a lot of world building, but it felt organic. It didn't bog down the story. It flowed, it built up tension and had me wanting more. There was political intrigue, demons, twisted timelines and pirates. The book surprised me and I'm looking forward to finding out what happens next. (Book 2 will be out in May 2019) I received this book from the publishers via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    As an aspiring writer myself, David B. Coe / D. B. Jackson is one of my biggest inspirations. I had the pleasure of meeting him and hearing him speak about this book at JordanCon '18. When I heard he was returning to epic fantasy, I was ecstatic. The LonTobyn Chronicles was one of the series that got me into epic fantasy (and showed me how to properly blend genres) and and the Forelands books are in my top 10 series of all time. Time's Children did not disappoint. Jackson has a way of making stor As an aspiring writer myself, David B. Coe / D. B. Jackson is one of my biggest inspirations. I had the pleasure of meeting him and hearing him speak about this book at JordanCon '18. When I heard he was returning to epic fantasy, I was ecstatic. The LonTobyn Chronicles was one of the series that got me into epic fantasy (and showed me how to properly blend genres) and and the Forelands books are in my top 10 series of all time. Time's Children did not disappoint. Jackson has a way of making stories that are both epic in scope and yet extremely down to earth and personal that I've rarely seen matched. This one is no exception. Interesting take on a magic system and thrilling throughout with realistic characters that you really feel and root for. Can't wait for the second book! Helen Keeley deserves a nod because she did a fantastic job bringing the audio book to life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Prescott

    closer to 3.5 stars. Listened to the audiobook version. I don't think I would have finished it had it been the book version. If you want to think about it in pop references, it's a little Yesterday's Enterprise, a little Freaky Friday, a little Juno. Lots of angst. But that is not being fair. It is a time travel book, set in a flintlock era. There is a war going on, it is not going well for the protagonist's side. He travels back in time. Something bad happens. It makes more sense when you are readi closer to 3.5 stars. Listened to the audiobook version. I don't think I would have finished it had it been the book version. If you want to think about it in pop references, it's a little Yesterday's Enterprise, a little Freaky Friday, a little Juno. Lots of angst. But that is not being fair. It is a time travel book, set in a flintlock era. There is a war going on, it is not going well for the protagonist's side. He travels back in time. Something bad happens. It makes more sense when you are reading it, but there are just a couple of big holes in the plot. Why a couple of characters decide to do specific things. It just wasn't that clear to me. It was also frustrating that it just wrapped things up enough, for the next book. I figure on reading or listening to book 2, it just won't be right away.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Woodge

    In this fantasy world there's Spanners, Walkers, and another group I can't remember. The first have the ability to travel great distances in a moment, the second can travel backwards in time, and then return, and the third can walk through walls but no one does that in this book. Tobias is a Walker, and is tasked with going back farther than anyone has. The catch is, he'll age those years he travels, too. There's also some demons -- creatures with abilities of their own. But for such a fat book, In this fantasy world there's Spanners, Walkers, and another group I can't remember. The first have the ability to travel great distances in a moment, the second can travel backwards in time, and then return, and the third can walk through walls but no one does that in this book. Tobias is a Walker, and is tasked with going back farther than anyone has. The catch is, he'll age those years he travels, too. There's also some demons -- creatures with abilities of their own. But for such a fat book, not that much happens beyond a couple of fights, torture, and a lot of babysitting a royal baby. I stuck it out because, well, I'd got pretty far in and kept hoping it would improve. I won't be reading the concluding second part.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ranna

    This book took me a long time to read. For some reason I had a hard time getting through to the end. I picked the book up and put it down so many times over the last month or so. But I didn't try to read any other book during that time, which usually if I'm having a hard time finishing a book I'll just go ahead and start a new one, so that says something about the story pulling me enough to keep picking up the book in hopes of getting to the last page. And it was worth the read. I liked the plot This book took me a long time to read. For some reason I had a hard time getting through to the end. I picked the book up and put it down so many times over the last month or so. But I didn't try to read any other book during that time, which usually if I'm having a hard time finishing a book I'll just go ahead and start a new one, so that says something about the story pulling me enough to keep picking up the book in hopes of getting to the last page. And it was worth the read. I liked the plot and I liked the main characters in the story. Even though it was not easy for me to get through, it was worth more than 3 stars. I will probably read the 2nd book too, and I hope it is even better than the first one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Fifteen-year-old Tobias time Walks back to try and save a kingdom and ends up in a 29-year-old body. This is a book that I should have just allowed myself to stop reading. I kept thinking I would like it more but this didn't happen. I'm racking this one up to a 'it's just not for me' - I think the book was fine. It's too slow-paced for me (and at 500 pages, that's a problem), had too much description for me (the room, the building, the city, the voyage), and not enough happened. If you like a slo Fifteen-year-old Tobias time Walks back to try and save a kingdom and ends up in a 29-year-old body. This is a book that I should have just allowed myself to stop reading. I kept thinking I would like it more but this didn't happen. I'm racking this one up to a 'it's just not for me' - I think the book was fine. It's too slow-paced for me (and at 500 pages, that's a problem), had too much description for me (the room, the building, the city, the voyage), and not enough happened. If you like a slower paced, building up to something book, it is neat that it's a time-travel fantasy which isn't as common as SF.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Jackson's writing is amazing and his storytelling skills are wonderful and delightful. Jackson never ceases to provide a good story and excellent writing.As of late i have somewhat fallen out of the fantasy genre, as I have been turned off by other authors given my preferences, but I will come back to the genre if he writes a story because of him. Time traveling if done right, which in this book has, can make for a fascinating story. A 14 going on 30 story, seriously one of the downsides of time Jackson's writing is amazing and his storytelling skills are wonderful and delightful. Jackson never ceases to provide a good story and excellent writing.As of late i have somewhat fallen out of the fantasy genre, as I have been turned off by other authors given my preferences, but I will come back to the genre if he writes a story because of him. Time traveling if done right, which in this book has, can make for a fascinating story. A 14 going on 30 story, seriously one of the downsides of time travel, to save his land only to come at the most bittersweet moment to protect a princess while adjusting to adulthood. I cannot wait to read the next book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    I'm surprised this is not considered YA. Perhaps there are rules and I don't know them. This book reminds me of "Powers" by Ursula Le Guin, which is marketed as YA. Perhaps that's the answer: the Marketing Team decides, not the content. Enjoyable book. I purchased the next in the series upon completion. It has the natural problem of any "travel back in time" story. There is always that option for the author to use as a solution, or as a problem. And if one side can do it, so can the other and even I'm surprised this is not considered YA. Perhaps there are rules and I don't know them. This book reminds me of "Powers" by Ursula Le Guin, which is marketed as YA. Perhaps that's the answer: the Marketing Team decides, not the content. Enjoyable book. I purchased the next in the series upon completion. It has the natural problem of any "travel back in time" story. There is always that option for the author to use as a solution, or as a problem. And if one side can do it, so can the other and events can be done and undone forever so all is at the mercy of when the author pulls the trick out of the hat. To me, that makes these jump back novels less enjoyable. But that's just me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Kondla

    The twist on time travel hooked me with this one - to travel through time costs you years, you age prematurely physically, but are the same age mentally and emotionally as when you travelled or “walked” Aside from the cool twist on time travel, Time’s Children offers interesting, sympathetic characters who are in a tough spot with no easy answers. Great world building, intriguing politics, and time demons (who I want to know better because they are repulsive and fascinating at the same time) I ea The twist on time travel hooked me with this one - to travel through time costs you years, you age prematurely physically, but are the same age mentally and emotionally as when you travelled or “walked” Aside from the cool twist on time travel, Time’s Children offers interesting, sympathetic characters who are in a tough spot with no easy answers. Great world building, intriguing politics, and time demons (who I want to know better because they are repulsive and fascinating at the same time) I eagerly await the sequel....

  30. 4 out of 5

    Realms & Robots

    Time’s Children is a tour-de-force, setting a fascinating tale of magic and intrigue amidst a world filled with dark corners and creatures who are not to be trusted. I loved every part of this book, and applaud the author on creating a compelling story filled with brilliantly rendered scenes, settings and details that made the world come alive. Prepare to be swept away by the tides of this masterful story. Full review at: https://reviewsandrobots.com/2018/10/... NOTE: I was provided a free copy of Time’s Children is a tour-de-force, setting a fascinating tale of magic and intrigue amidst a world filled with dark corners and creatures who are not to be trusted. I loved every part of this book, and applaud the author on creating a compelling story filled with brilliantly rendered scenes, settings and details that made the world come alive. Prepare to be swept away by the tides of this masterful story. Full review at: https://reviewsandrobots.com/2018/10/... NOTE: I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. I only publish reviews of books I enjoy, and this novel meets that criterion.

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