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Selected Poetry

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A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They ran A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They range from lyric poetry to narrative verse, based on traditional Russian stories of enchanted tsars and magical fish. Together, they show the dazzling range and achievement of Russia's greatest poet.


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A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They ran A new collection of Pushkin's great narrative and lyric verse, translated by Antony Wood Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman is the second-most famous poem in Russian literature after his Eugene Onegin, and notoriously difficult to translate. This new translation, described by Robert Chandler as 'truly wonderful', is accompanied here by Pushkin's greatest shorter verses. They range from lyric poetry to narrative verse, based on traditional Russian stories of enchanted tsars and magical fish. Together, they show the dazzling range and achievement of Russia's greatest poet.

30 review for Selected Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    E. G.

    Chronology Introduction & Notes, by Antony Wood Translating Pushkin Further Reading I. Lyric Poems St Petersburg, 1814-20 --To a Young Beauty who has Taken Snuff (1814) --The Rose (1815) --To Baroness M. A. Delvig (1815) --To Princess V. M. Volkonskaya (1816) --The Singer (1816) --The Window (1816) --Liberty: An Ode (1817) --To Chaadayev (1818) --O. Masson (1819) --A Good Revel (1819) --Renaissance (1819) --You and I (1820) --To Yuryev (1820) Exile, 1820-26 --'The light of day has faded' (1820) --The Nereid (182 Chronology Introduction & Notes, by Antony Wood Translating Pushkin Further Reading I. Lyric Poems St Petersburg, 1814-20 --To a Young Beauty who has Taken Snuff (1814) --The Rose (1815) --To Baroness M. A. Delvig (1815) --To Princess V. M. Volkonskaya (1816) --The Singer (1816) --The Window (1816) --Liberty: An Ode (1817) --To Chaadayev (1818) --O. Masson (1819) --A Good Revel (1819) --Renaissance (1819) --You and I (1820) --To Yuryev (1820) Exile, 1820-26 --'The light of day has faded' (1820) --The Nereid (1820) --'I have outlived desires' (1821) --The Prisoner (1822) --A Songbird (1823) --Night (1823) --'I went alone before the dawn' (1823) --[On Vorontsov] ('Half trade, half grand seigneur') (1824) --'Zephyrs share / The midnight air' (1824) --To *** ('It comes to me again, that moment') (1825) --'Late blooms I find more pleasing' (1825) --Winter Evening (1825) --Prose Writer and Poet (1825) --Mniszek's 'sonnet', from Boris Godunov (1825) --Confession (1826) --The Prophet (1826) Moscow and St Petersburg, 1826-30 --[To my Nanny] ('My dear companion of past times') (1826) --Winter Road (1826) --To I. I. Pushchin (1826) --'Deep in the Siberian mines' (1827) --Arion (1827) --The Angel (1827) --The Poet (1827) --19 October 1827 (1827) --The Talisman (1827) --Recollection (1828) --Thou and You (1828) --'My beauty, sing to me no more' (1828) --Portrait (1828) --The Drowned Man (1828) --The Upas Tree (1828) --'Raven flies to raven' (1828) --The Poet and the Crowd (1828) --A Flower (1828) --'City of splendour, city of poor' (1828) --Signs (1829) --'Once there lived a humble knight' (1829) --'The mists of night enfold the Georgian hills' (1829) --From Hafiz (1829) --'The drums of reveille sound . . .' (1829) --The Monastery on Mount Kazbek (1829) --'Winter. The country' (1829) --Winter Morning (1829) --'I loved you: in my heart, perhaps' (1829) --'I walk the crowded thoroughfare' (1829) --'Inscribe my name? What good--' (1830) --'No, I have lost the taste for stormy pleasure' (1830) --To the Poet (1830) --Madonna (1830) --Demons (1830) --Elegy (1830) --To the Bust of a Conqueror (1830) --Rhyme (1830) --Invocation (1830) --Mary's Song, from A Feast during the Plague (1830) --Master of the Revels' song, from A Feast during the Plague (1830) --'Bound for your distant homeland' (1830) Married Life, 1831-6 --To the Slanderers of Russia (1831) --My Pedigree (1831) --For the Album of Princess Anna Abamelek (1832) --The Beauty (1832) --Autumn (A fragment) (1833) --'It's time, my love, it's time!' (1834) --[from Anacreon:] A fragment (1835) --'. . . I see again / That corner of the earth' (1835) --'The ready power of suffering' (1835) The Stone Island Cycle: --From Pindemonte (1836) --'The desert fathers and unblemished women' (1836) --Imitation of the Italian (1836) --Secular Power (1836) --'When, alone with my thoughts, I leave the city' (1836) --'I have made myself, but not with hands, a monument' (1836) II. Narrative Poems (Poemy) --The Fountain of Bakhchisaray (1823) --The Gypsies (1824) --The Bridegroom (1825) --Count Nulin (1825) --A Little House in Kolomna (1830) --The Bronze Horseman (1833) III. Fairy Tales (Skazki) --The Tale of Tsar Saltan (1831) --The Tale of a Fisherman and a Little Fish (1833) --The Tale of the Dead Princess and the Seven Champions (1833) --The Tale of the Golden Cockerel (1834) Abbreviations Glossary of Metrical Terms Notes Acknowledgements

  2. 4 out of 5

    GONZA

    I've always thought that it doesn't make much sense to read the poems of some poets unless they are in their original language, and after reading the translator's foreword to this Puskin's collection in English, my idea has only been confirmed. Apart from that, I have only read the actual poems, leaving aside the ballads and short stories in lyrical form, and they are certainly beautiful, but the predominant feeling remains the regret of not having learned Russian. Ho sempre pensato che non avess I've always thought that it doesn't make much sense to read the poems of some poets unless they are in their original language, and after reading the translator's foreword to this Puskin's collection in English, my idea has only been confirmed. Apart from that, I have only read the actual poems, leaving aside the ballads and short stories in lyrical form, and they are certainly beautiful, but the predominant feeling remains the regret of not having learned Russian. Ho sempre pensato che non avesse molto senso leggere le poesie di alcuni poeti se non in lingua originale, e dopo aver letto la premessa del traduttore a questa raccolta in inglese di Puskin la mia idea non si é che confermata. A parte questo, ho letto soltanto le poesie vere e proprie, lasciando perdere le ballate e i racconti in forma di lirica e sicuramente sono bellissime, ma il sentimento predominante resta il dispiacere di non conoscere il russo.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Elder

    Good to finally read Pushkin, the poet of my people, but what this did to me more than anything else is make me grieve that I couldn’t read it in the original language. I’ve never wanted to learn Russian more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    June

    This is an excellent selection of Pushkin's lyric poetry, translated by Anthony Wood. He strives to replicate meter and rhyme in addition to capturing the sense of Pushkin's often-complex verse. Here is his rendering of the final verse of Ode to Liberty, the 1817 poem that got Pushkin exiled: Learn then, rulers of the world: No dungeon, no reward, No piety, no punishment Can be your faithful guard. But if you are the first to bow Before the trusted Law, The People’s peace and liberty Will keep your thro This is an excellent selection of Pushkin's lyric poetry, translated by Anthony Wood. He strives to replicate meter and rhyme in addition to capturing the sense of Pushkin's often-complex verse. Here is his rendering of the final verse of Ode to Liberty, the 1817 poem that got Pushkin exiled: Learn then, rulers of the world: No dungeon, no reward, No piety, no punishment Can be your faithful guard. But if you are the first to bow Before the trusted Law, The People’s peace and liberty Will keep your throne secure. And the original: И днесь учитесь, о цари: Ни наказанья, ни награды, Ни кров темниц, ни алтари Не верные для вас ограды. Склонитесь первые главой Под сень надежную Закона, И станут вечной стражей трона Народов вольность и покой. The edition also includes a helpful chronology of Pushkin's life that would be very useful in the classroom. There are also notes and explanations to help even non-Russophile readers understand more background. Thank you to the publishers and NetGalley for a digital ARC for the purpose of an unbiased review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    I rarely mention translators, but Wood’s versions of Pushkin are super. Hidden gems: a couple of untitled lyrics 1829-30.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Reading Pushkin has been on my to-do list for ages, and this was an easy entry of a translation with helpful, relevant, historical explanations.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I am a big fan of Russian literature, and Puskin in general, so I was happy to see a Penguin Classic of one of the most influential writers in Russian history. Penguin Classic has always been my go-to edition for classic lit. The poems were organized by type then chronologically which I think is the best way to go and I appreciated the detail in Wood's "Translating Pushkin". The introduction is helpful and detailed and provides a great introduction to Pushkin and Russian poetry in general. Overa I am a big fan of Russian literature, and Puskin in general, so I was happy to see a Penguin Classic of one of the most influential writers in Russian history. Penguin Classic has always been my go-to edition for classic lit. The poems were organized by type then chronologically which I think is the best way to go and I appreciated the detail in Wood's "Translating Pushkin". The introduction is helpful and detailed and provides a great introduction to Pushkin and Russian poetry in general. Overall a great addition to Penguin Classics and I look forward to grabbing a physical copy when it's released. Many thanks to Penguin and NetGalley for a free digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    Pushkin is definitely one of my favorite poets, and this collections is a fantastic one, from the beautiful "Autumn: A Fragment," to the profound "The Bronze Horseman," to the delightful Skakzi "Tsar Saltan." Pushkin is definitely one of my favorite poets, and this collections is a fantastic one, from the beautiful "Autumn: A Fragment," to the profound "The Bronze Horseman," to the delightful Skakzi "Tsar Saltan."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Miba

    Lovely poems in translation but it makes me wonder what the actual Russian might be like.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Bisset

    Beautifully translated by Antony Wood. The lyric poems were a revelation.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Brown

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mugren Ohaly

  14. 5 out of 5

    robert hurley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aimelia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kiera Cannon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tesni

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maija

  19. 5 out of 5

    bd

  20. 4 out of 5

    William Schrecengost

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ross MacMillan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aporias

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kai

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lis

  27. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle Williamson

  28. 4 out of 5

    James

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yellow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Philip Hamilton

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