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Unregistered

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Living the ideal life is a human right, unless you’re unregistered. Living under the watchful eye of the Metrics Worldwide Government has its perks. Citizens are assigned a life, so they don’t worry about finding schools, jobs, or spouses for themselves. They’re even allowed to have one child, enabling them to focus on raising an ideal son or daughter and experience an opt Living the ideal life is a human right, unless you’re unregistered. Living under the watchful eye of the Metrics Worldwide Government has its perks. Citizens are assigned a life, so they don’t worry about finding schools, jobs, or spouses for themselves. They’re even allowed to have one child, enabling them to focus on raising an ideal son or daughter and experience an optimally satisfying family life. The only people left out are the unlucky accidental second children, called the unregistered. For 20-year-old Bristol, this is the only life he knows. But he can’t shake the feeling that something is wrong with his world, and spends his nights painting controversial murals in low-profile parts of town. Metrics doesn’t like the murals, or the frustrations of the unregistered citizens they represent. They enact their long-debated unregistered solution: publicly, they announce the relocation of all unregistered citizens to far-off desert states. But when Bristol and his friends discover the dark truth behind the plan, they must work together to escape the clutches of their motherland, and survive long enough to discover an unknown world.


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Living the ideal life is a human right, unless you’re unregistered. Living under the watchful eye of the Metrics Worldwide Government has its perks. Citizens are assigned a life, so they don’t worry about finding schools, jobs, or spouses for themselves. They’re even allowed to have one child, enabling them to focus on raising an ideal son or daughter and experience an opt Living the ideal life is a human right, unless you’re unregistered. Living under the watchful eye of the Metrics Worldwide Government has its perks. Citizens are assigned a life, so they don’t worry about finding schools, jobs, or spouses for themselves. They’re even allowed to have one child, enabling them to focus on raising an ideal son or daughter and experience an optimally satisfying family life. The only people left out are the unlucky accidental second children, called the unregistered. For 20-year-old Bristol, this is the only life he knows. But he can’t shake the feeling that something is wrong with his world, and spends his nights painting controversial murals in low-profile parts of town. Metrics doesn’t like the murals, or the frustrations of the unregistered citizens they represent. They enact their long-debated unregistered solution: publicly, they announce the relocation of all unregistered citizens to far-off desert states. But when Bristol and his friends discover the dark truth behind the plan, they must work together to escape the clutches of their motherland, and survive long enough to discover an unknown world.

30 review for Unregistered

  1. 4 out of 5

    WorD Publishing-pgh

    Love the world building Megan Lynch created in this unique universe. Looking forward to reading more stories from this dystopian universe.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan Csoke

    Bristol Ray shared a room with his mother and sister Denver in a controlled environment with street cameras to watch everyone and a curfew to be obeyed. Tracking chips were implanted in their hands. They were the UNREGISTERED!!!!! Thank you Goodreads for this free book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chasity Martin

    Omg’sh! Read this in one day!! Megan Lynch, you rock!! I met you at the 37th annual Kentucky book fair and enjoyed our short conversation, so much so, I purchased this book!! So lead the way to the next chapter! I can’t wait!!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie Blythe

    *This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review* In the future, American government has made it so everything is done and figured out for everyone. It is made up of tiers where 1’s are the richest, best, most inspiring people to become, and 5’s are the lowest class where they have crappy jobs, not as much money, and are looked down upon. When kids are at a certain age they are put into a drawing to see what type of job and spouse they will have. The government usually tr *This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review* In the future, American government has made it so everything is done and figured out for everyone. It is made up of tiers where 1’s are the richest, best, most inspiring people to become, and 5’s are the lowest class where they have crappy jobs, not as much money, and are looked down upon. When kids are at a certain age they are put into a drawing to see what type of job and spouse they will have. The government usually tries to keep the classes together, but as an example, there are some times where a 3 and 4 will be put together. Families are also only meant to have one child, however if a family does have a second child, then the second child is called an “unregistered”, where they are lower than 5’s and they aren’t real citizens (or people) in the government’s eyes. This story is told in multiple perspectives: Bristol, who is an unregistered, loves to go out and paint controversial murals on walls, Denver, Bristol’s older sister who soon to be married and going to get a job, Samara, who is twenty and very smart is working as a teacher in a young boys prison, and Jude, a ten year old boy who is wrongfully convicted of a crime and sent to prison. Everyone is on their own special path in life and they all see and hear things that start to make them question if the way the system works is truly the best way for everyone. I absolutely loved this book. I loved all the characters, and I loved how they all had such different voices. The more you learn about how this system works, the more shocking everything becomes and I was heartbroken by some of the stories that the boys in the prison had. It’s such a corrupt, evil, system that want’s “perfect people” and will try to do literally anything they have to, to make a “perfect world.” ***Review has been done in conjunction with Nerd Girl Official. For more information regarding our reviews please visit our Fansite: www.facebook.com/NerdGirl.ng***

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clabe Polk

    Imagine a world in which there is a rigidly controlled caste system, where one must apply for marriage which may be approved to into a lower or higher caste depending upon your social indiscretions, your intelligence or simply where the government needs workers. Imagine that art is non-existent, that one can be imprisoned simply for being ‘different’, that racial differences are ironed out by controlled manipulating marriages and strictly controlling births. Imagine that no one is allowed to see Imagine a world in which there is a rigidly controlled caste system, where one must apply for marriage which may be approved to into a lower or higher caste depending upon your social indiscretions, your intelligence or simply where the government needs workers. Imagine that art is non-existent, that one can be imprisoned simply for being ‘different’, that racial differences are ironed out by controlled manipulating marriages and strictly controlling births. Imagine that no one is allowed to see, read, or know anything the government does not approve; that is, anything that is not part of their prescribed program for ‘your’ wellbeing. Now, imagine Bristol…a non-entity in this ‘perfect’ world. Bristol is a person without an identity; an “unregistered”, meaning that his birth was illegal so he must live completely outside the prescribed social order. However, Bristol has a talent for art and his graphiti art inspires secret admirers. Now, enters Jude…a boy framed by the police for Bristol’s artwork and sent to prison. He is a boy who never loses faith despite the abuse. A boy the prison warden plans to kill to effect population control in the prison. Then, then is Samara, Jude’s prison teacher who sees his abuse and the fallacies of her boss, the warden. Samara, inspired by Bristol’s art begins to question society and her place within it. Denver, Bristol’s sister, never considers disobedience and is fearful Bristol will be caught and executed. She is assigned to a loveless marriage; a marriage with a fateful twist. This handful of characters come together in an unexpected way that rocks their world, shows them there is more than they’ve been told and gives them hope for the future. The Unregistered is much more than I hoped for when I began reading it. I found myself engrossed and really empathetic to the characters. This is a fascinating read with potentially serious social implications and a couple of major twists that keeps readers guessing. It should be enjoyed by those who enjoy dystopia and anyone who is into reading about strange overbearing social systems.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    "But consider this: fewer people and more technology is always the better way." It is the future and Metrics Worldwide Government controls all aspects of the lives of citizens. People are divided into Tiers 1 through 5, with Tier 1 getting the most privileges, including preferred jobs, housing, spouses. People are allowed to live to exactly 75 years old. They get married at 25 years old, after having their spouse chosen for them. Their jobs are chosen for them. The food they're allowed to eat is c "But consider this: fewer people and more technology is always the better way." It is the future and Metrics Worldwide Government controls all aspects of the lives of citizens. People are divided into Tiers 1 through 5, with Tier 1 getting the most privileges, including preferred jobs, housing, spouses. People are allowed to live to exactly 75 years old. They get married at 25 years old, after having their spouse chosen for them. Their jobs are chosen for them. The food they're allowed to eat is chosen for them. AND more and more jobs and functions are being handled by technology. Oh, and guess what? If you have more than the one allotted child, the "extra" child is Unregistered - not assigned a Tier level, given the jobs no one else wants, not allowed to marry. Bristol is Unregistered. He works doing scut work in a restaurant kitchen when he really wants to be an artist, a desire he fulfills by painting controversial graffiti around the town he lives in. This dystopian world created by author Lynch is a darn scary place because it sounds possible. Far out there but possible. In-depth world building, engaging characters and some thought-provoking concepts are brought forward in this first book in a new series. AND it didn't end at a terrible cliffhanger. Big plus. I received this book from City Owl Press through Net Galley in exchange for my unbiased review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I like dystopian novels, but they often are missing something. They over-explain the dystopia’s rules, they only show the structure in limited spheres of life, they only show one character’s POV, etc. Unregistered avoids all the typical pitfalls of a dystopian novel and gives us a new world to explore. We get to follow several characters as they navigate their spheres: prison, school, work, home. These scenes allow us to see how the system works in all levels of life while also letting us learn I like dystopian novels, but they often are missing something. They over-explain the dystopia’s rules, they only show the structure in limited spheres of life, they only show one character’s POV, etc. Unregistered avoids all the typical pitfalls of a dystopian novel and gives us a new world to explore. We get to follow several characters as they navigate their spheres: prison, school, work, home. These scenes allow us to see how the system works in all levels of life while also letting us learn about it ourselves. Amazing job at showing rather than telling! Also, one big bonus is that people in this dystopia are POC and mixed race, which is AMAZING and so rare. I love that everyone can see themselves in this world and it feels real!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    Author M Lynch hit the nail on the head illustrating a dystopian society in a way that is relatable to the YA reader, a good read for both the young and not so young adult! The Metrics Government, in Unregistered, controls all facets of its citizens lives, as small as a severely limited choice in clothing to as major as choosing your spouse if you wish to marry. If that's not bad enough the real kicker is how the Criminal Justice System is run, unbelievable! Well worth the read to discover that Author M Lynch hit the nail on the head illustrating a dystopian society in a way that is relatable to the YA reader, a good read for both the young and not so young adult! The Metrics Government, in Unregistered, controls all facets of its citizens lives, as small as a severely limited choice in clothing to as major as choosing your spouse if you wish to marry. If that's not bad enough the real kicker is how the Criminal Justice System is run, unbelievable! Well worth the read to discover that aspect! With great characters in a plot that keeps anticipation flowing you can't help but root for the underdogs!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    The dystopian world presented in Unregistered is interesting and feels lived in, but what really makes this book work are the characters. Each one has a distinct voice and an interesting arc. The relationships between them feel natural, and I'm looking forward to seeing how they evolve in the next volume. The dystopian world presented in Unregistered is interesting and feels lived in, but what really makes this book work are the characters. Each one has a distinct voice and an interesting arc. The relationships between them feel natural, and I'm looking forward to seeing how they evolve in the next volume.

  10. 4 out of 5

    InD'tale Magazine

    "Unregistered" is quite engaging, with deep, thought-provoking ideas of government. Read full review in the 2017 December issue of InD'tale Magazine. "Unregistered" is quite engaging, with deep, thought-provoking ideas of government. Read full review in the 2017 December issue of InD'tale Magazine.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam Caus

    The only complaint I have about the book is that I have to wait for the next installment. Unregistered is a unique take on a popular genre, and ties in so much of what we see happening today. M. Lynch is an amazing talent and I cannot wait to see what she puts out next!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle King

    I really enjoyed this book, and I can't wait for the sequel! It was hard to put down - I read it in 2 days. I do really like both YA and dystopian novels, so this book was right up my alley. But if you don’t tend to like those kinds of books then you probably wouldn’t like this one. I really enjoyed this book, and I can't wait for the sequel! It was hard to put down - I read it in 2 days. I do really like both YA and dystopian novels, so this book was right up my alley. But if you don’t tend to like those kinds of books then you probably wouldn’t like this one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl Martin

    I received an e-copy of this book from netgalley and I was really impressed. It wasn't just a retelling of the hunger games, the giver, or divergent. It was different with extremely relatable characters who you loved and villians who you hated. A great great book. I received an e-copy of this book from netgalley and I was really impressed. It wasn't just a retelling of the hunger games, the giver, or divergent. It was different with extremely relatable characters who you loved and villians who you hated. A great great book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Great characters and great comments on our current society. I read the entire book in one day, couldn't put it down! Plot flows very fast! Great characters and great comments on our current society. I read the entire book in one day, couldn't put it down! Plot flows very fast!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie Riggs

    Please read my daughter's book and ignore the typo on page 166. Please read my daughter's book and ignore the typo on page 166.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Farley

    Bristol is a second child in a world where second children are no longer allowed. According to the worldwide Metrics government, he barely exists at all. Bristol can never become an artist, no matter how talented he is. Instead, he paints graffiti in the hours after curfew, leaving vivid messages on walls throughout the city. Samara lives close to one of the walls Bristol regularly paints on and is an admirer of his work. She’s shocked and saddened when the government announces that they’ve capt Bristol is a second child in a world where second children are no longer allowed. According to the worldwide Metrics government, he barely exists at all. Bristol can never become an artist, no matter how talented he is. Instead, he paints graffiti in the hours after curfew, leaving vivid messages on walls throughout the city. Samara lives close to one of the walls Bristol regularly paints on and is an admirer of his work. She’s shocked and saddened when the government announces that they’ve captured the graffiti artist, but not quite as shocked as Bristol, who sees the report on the news. Throughout Jude’s hearing and subsequent imprisonment, the ten year old boy remains confident that his innocence will eventually earn his freedom. Nothing shakes his certainty until the morning he discovers drugs planted in his bed. Where many novels are quick to establish the negative aspects of totalitarianism, much of the Metrics government’s laws appear logical at first, beneficial even. Instead of broadcasting secret societies and mass uprising as the only hope for an oppressed people, Unregistered focuses on a more personal quest to aid a child convicted for a crime he didn’t commit. The elements of public resistance in M. Lynch’s novel are quieter and less certain and this approach presents the reader with plenty of grey areas to ponder as the story unfolds. The characters are well rounded and possessed of a maturity that makes them so much more interesting than the gung-ho vigilantes that normally take centre stage in YA. Unregistered is one of the more innovative and gratifying novels to enter the Dystopian genre. (Reviewed for Reader's Favorite)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maria Beltrami

    A world without racism, where ability and merit are the foundations of society, and where, in order not to waste resources, careful birth planning is applied. What more could one want? And what could go wrong once all this is put into practice? Well, history teaches us that when it comes to giving utopias a practical version, mankind has a 100% capacity to screw things up. And indeed, in these United States of an unspecified future, where, following a couple of civil wars, it was thought to elimin A world without racism, where ability and merit are the foundations of society, and where, in order not to waste resources, careful birth planning is applied. What more could one want? And what could go wrong once all this is put into practice? Well, history teaches us that when it comes to giving utopias a practical version, mankind has a 100% capacity to screw things up. And indeed, in these United States of an unspecified future, where, following a couple of civil wars, it was thought to eliminate racial tensions with a system of arranged marriages between light and dark skinned people in order to obtain a uniform colour, where the one-child policy is in force and where people's abilities have been defined once and for all, creating social classes, things start to go wrong. Because, of course, not everyone is satisfied with just one child and brings a second one into the world, although he or she will be devoid of rights. Or, if the parents are not satisfied with the first child, they will try to get rid of it more or less legally in order to have another one. Or again, someone may fall in love with someone who is not meant for them. The cauldron boils, and boils, and boils, waiting for an eruption that is known to be coming. Apart from a few plot threads left loose, a good read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan Lawton

    Unregistered is a totalitarian tale following a handful of citizens and their various statuses in this world. An "unregistered" is one who has not been assigned into one of the government classes of people, based on their being an unwanted/accidental second child of their parents. It's a dystopian world based on what sounded like an intriguing concept. I found myself struggling to differentiate between the characters, and couldn't help but wonder if the story's pace was going to pick up. I think Unregistered is a totalitarian tale following a handful of citizens and their various statuses in this world. An "unregistered" is one who has not been assigned into one of the government classes of people, based on their being an unwanted/accidental second child of their parents. It's a dystopian world based on what sounded like an intriguing concept. I found myself struggling to differentiate between the characters, and couldn't help but wonder if the story's pace was going to pick up. I think Unregistered would appeal to YA readers, and I suspect they'd enjoy it. Simply put, it wasn't for me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cherity

    This is sort of a different spin on the Handmaid's Tale-like society - former United States, segregated classes of people where moving up is highly unlikely, highly regulated society, however the main problem in this book is too many people so the government is trying to limit fertility and get rid of extra people including children. I couldn't put the book down and now waiting for a sequel. This is sort of a different spin on the Handmaid's Tale-like society - former United States, segregated classes of people where moving up is highly unlikely, highly regulated society, however the main problem in this book is too many people so the government is trying to limit fertility and get rid of extra people including children. I couldn't put the book down and now waiting for a sequel.

  20. 4 out of 5

    E.J. Wenstrom

    A science fiction story with a lot of heart. I warmed up quickly to all four of the core characters within this grim dystopian world. The later chapters, particularly when the characters [SPOILER ALERT] reach the safe house and discover the books, was reminiscient to me of the heart found in Farenheit 451, with a soul anchored in the importance of stories in making us fully human.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Viner

    Good story I enjoyed how well written this is . It makes you think of how disconnected we actually are with all the technology available to us these days.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jane Firebaugh

    I very much enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading the others in the series. If you like dystopian stories such as Hunger Games and Divergent, I highly recommend this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marla Diane

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha

  25. 4 out of 5

    liz

  26. 4 out of 5

    lynn crippen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andreas Buch

  28. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Portman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susan Perkel

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