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The Autobiography of Mr. Spock

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Fictional autobiography of the iconic Star Trek character, told in his own words and telling the story of his life, including his difficult childhood, his adventures on the Enterprise, and his death and resurrection on the Genesis Planet. "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" tells the story of one of Starfleet's finest officers, and one the Federations most celebrated citizens. Fictional autobiography of the iconic Star Trek character, told in his own words and telling the story of his life, including his difficult childhood, his adventures on the Enterprise, and his death and resurrection on the Genesis Planet. "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" tells the story of one of Starfleet's finest officers, and one the Federations most celebrated citizens. Half human and half Vulcan, the book, written in Spock's own words, follows his difficult childhood on the planet Vulcan; his controversial enrollment at Starfleet Academy; his adventures with Captain Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise; his diplomatic triumphs with the Klingons and Romulans; and his death and amazing resurrection on the Genesis Planet. We meet the friends he's made, the women he loved, and experience the triumphs and tragedies of a life and career that spanned a century. Despite his alien blood, his struggle to find his place in the universe is one we can all relate to.


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Fictional autobiography of the iconic Star Trek character, told in his own words and telling the story of his life, including his difficult childhood, his adventures on the Enterprise, and his death and resurrection on the Genesis Planet. "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" tells the story of one of Starfleet's finest officers, and one the Federations most celebrated citizens. Fictional autobiography of the iconic Star Trek character, told in his own words and telling the story of his life, including his difficult childhood, his adventures on the Enterprise, and his death and resurrection on the Genesis Planet. "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" tells the story of one of Starfleet's finest officers, and one the Federations most celebrated citizens. Half human and half Vulcan, the book, written in Spock's own words, follows his difficult childhood on the planet Vulcan; his controversial enrollment at Starfleet Academy; his adventures with Captain Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise; his diplomatic triumphs with the Klingons and Romulans; and his death and amazing resurrection on the Genesis Planet. We meet the friends he's made, the women he loved, and experience the triumphs and tragedies of a life and career that spanned a century. Despite his alien blood, his struggle to find his place in the universe is one we can all relate to.

30 review for The Autobiography of Mr. Spock

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I’m not a Trekkie by any means, but I do appreciate Star Trek. It’s a terrific fictional creation, but fiction so often blurs lines with reality for fans and novices and it is out of that intersectionality that this autobiography is born. So let’s refer to it as the real thing (and not a creation of a Star trek novelization expert), because it was intended as such. Spock (along with Data) has always been my favorite Star Trek character. A man of logic, calm and patience, a moral and intelligent I’m not a Trekkie by any means, but I do appreciate Star Trek. It’s a terrific fictional creation, but fiction so often blurs lines with reality for fans and novices and it is out of that intersectionality that this autobiography is born. So let’s refer to it as the real thing (and not a creation of a Star trek novelization expert), because it was intended as such. Spock (along with Data) has always been my favorite Star Trek character. A man of logic, calm and patience, a moral and intelligent man, just the light you need amid the chaos. But because Spock is a very much a creature of the mind, his memoirs read accordingly. Which is to say these are not the juiciest of memoirs. They are as sedate, pensive and measured as the man who wrote them. In fact, those who mostly know Spock from the recent movies would be disappointed to find out that the romance with the beguiling Nyota isn’t anywhere to be found within these pages since that was a creation of the alternate star Trek universe. In this timeline Spock has never had a romantic interest. A devoted son, a dedicated friend and occasionally a caring mentor, but never a lover…nor a fighter. Spock’s life as he describes it was a long and difficult struggle with the duality of his nature (Mom’s from Earth, Dad’s from Vulcan) and then subsequently finding his place in the world and righting whatever great injustices he found to right, always in a peaceable manner. In every possible way Mr. Spock is an admirable character and his intelligent humane presence comes through in his words, in his life. This is exactly the kind of person who should write a memoir, someone who has lived a long and remarkable life and has lessons to impart and knowledge to pass on. And sure, it’s fictional, but a good fictional memoir still beats the whiny, maudlin, overshare driven crap out there that rules the modern memoir market. The exact same way good fiction often beats underwhelming reality. For Star Trek fans this’ll surely be a delight. For the rest, it is a charming read in its own way, but possibly not for everyone. It isn’t fast paced or salacious or boombastic in any way. Just a fictional life lived well. The author (or as she prefers to maintain the novelty, the editor) did a perfectly good job. From her bio it seems that she has certainly had plenty of experience writing within the Star Trek universe as if gearing up for this endeavor. Not to be outdone or accused of preferentiality, Titan books is publishing the autobiography of other Star Trek’s greats, if you’re into that sort of thing. For me, Mr. Spock is perfectly enough. I enjoyed his story. Live long and prosper. Thanks Netgalley. This and more at https://advancetheplot.weebly.com/

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Manning

    I am a massive Star Trek fan. It’s one of my favourite things in life. I’m a fan of new trek, old trek and everything in-between. My favourite is the original series. I could go off on about why I think it’s so good, but I’ll save that for another time. My favourite character is Spock. When I found out this book was being published, as the next instalment to the fantastic Star Trek autobiography series, I was excited. The book lives up to my expectations. Since it’s from Spock viewpoint it’s not I am a massive Star Trek fan. It’s one of my favourite things in life. I’m a fan of new trek, old trek and everything in-between. My favourite is the original series. I could go off on about why I think it’s so good, but I’ll save that for another time. My favourite character is Spock. When I found out this book was being published, as the next instalment to the fantastic Star Trek autobiography series, I was excited. The book lives up to my expectations. Since it’s from Spock viewpoint it’s not told as a typical autobiography but instead in the format of the t’san a’lat, a traditional Vulcan text that Vulcans would write towards the end of their lives to detail the wisdom they have gained over their lives. The book is written as if it was just before the events of the 2009 film, detailing Spock’s life up that point through a series of chapters, each one dedicated to someone important in Spock’s life. When I first started this book, I thought it was going to be something like a greatest hits tour, where it would go through the memorable episodes and films in the Star Trek universe. It doesn’t do this at all, in fact it barely mentions the 5 year mission and the events of Wrath of Kahn take up about two pages. I wouldn’t recommend this for anybody other than big-time Star Trek fans. It’s not for people who haven’t seen at least the original series, the accompanying films and Star Trek Discovery: Season 2. It brushes over a lot of details and assumes you already know those details. For example, the chapter about Captain Kirk is very brief and he is barely mentioned in the book, even though he is an important person to Spock in the universe. The reason for this is explained and it makes sense, but this is an add-on to everything else that has come before. It also touches on some non-canon books, such as The Pandora Principle, which I haven’t read but will be soon. It’s a really in-depth character study and is enjoyable to read. There is a lot of detail in sections of Spock’s life, especially his time on Romulus that is touched upon in Next Generation. It also feels like a prequel to Star Trek: Picard, with the events at the end of the book directly leading into that show. Spock is also writing this to Picard as the person who will deal with his legacy after death. I really enjoyed this book. It feels like Spock and you can almost hear it in Leonard Nimoy’s voice when reading. There are moments when the voice is lost and it doesn’t feel like the character at all but for the most part Uma McCormack does a really good job and it’s made me want to revisit my favourite episodes and films all over again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    4.5/5 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MR. SPOCK by Una McCormack is going to be something that I suspect will be controversial and yet rewarding for all of those audience members who choose to enjoy it. It is a book that is heavily tied to STAR TREK: DISCOVERY and if you have not experienced all three seasons of that show then you will miss out on a large number of details that may or may not make maximum sense. This includes the attempts on Sarek's life by "Logic Extremists", the 'Red Angel' plotline, and t 4.5/5 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MR. SPOCK by Una McCormack is going to be something that I suspect will be controversial and yet rewarding for all of those audience members who choose to enjoy it. It is a book that is heavily tied to STAR TREK: DISCOVERY and if you have not experienced all three seasons of that show then you will miss out on a large number of details that may or may not make maximum sense. This includes the attempts on Sarek's life by "Logic Extremists", the 'Red Angel' plotline, and the ultimate fate of the Romulans and Vulcans as revealed in the episode "Unification III." The "Romulan Warrior Nuns" from Picard (forgive me, I'm terrible with Trek names) also play an exceptional role. Those who restrict themselves to only TOS and the TNG era will find much of the book mystifying. Given that I am a die-hard DISCO and NuTrek fan, I have little problem here and think one of the best Star Trek books of all time was STAR TREK: DISCOVERY: THE WAY TO THE STARS by the same author. The premise is that Mr. Spock is writing his memoirs (using a Vulcan word for them) in the last days before he takes off in the Jellyfish to attempt his plan to save Romulus from a destructive supernova. The result of this event was detailed in the also-controversial (but very popular) Star Trek (2009). Basically, this is a book that homages and celebrates the past two decades as much as the previous thirty before that. As I've mentioned before, I think Una McCormack is someone who is able to provide depth and context to characters as well as situations that might otherwise lack it. THE LAST BEST HOPE is something that I have repeatedly said should have been the first two episodes or pilot of Picard. Here, she provides a fascinating (no pun intended) look at Spock's childhood relationship with Michael Burnham and even incorporates the much-maligned Sybok into the narrative in a way that is organic to making the universe's most famous Vulcan into the man he became. Much of this book is devoted to Spock's childhood on Vulcan and his unhappy relationship with his father Sarek that provides much of the narrative. I suspect this will provide most old school Trek fans their favorite parts of the story as well. In simple terms, Spock never gets on with his dad and even when they make up, they never make it last. One of the funniest in a black comedy sort of way scenes is where Spock talks at great length of how making peace with Cardassia was a fool's errand, that they were a brutal dictatorship, and they would never honor any treaties. His father was disgusted and it became the second great fight of their lives. This despite the fact that Spock was working on his Reunification movement (with Sarek's disapproval) and both of them had worked to make a lasting peace with the Klingons. Another thing to note is that this novel retcons the retcon of The Autobiography of James T. Kirk that postulated Star Trek V: The Final Frontier was an in-universe movie created by the people of the Roman planet in "Bread and Circuses." Here, the events of the film obviously happened and, furthermore, Una McCormack is able to salvage a coherent (even tragic) narrative from the underdeveloped Sybok's story. In simple terms, Spock and his elder "know him in a Vulcan Christmas Card sort of way" half-brother were both outcasts unfulfilled by Vulcan society. Whereas Spock was psychically contacted by V'Ger and developed a profound insight into the nature of the unievrse, Sybok ended up making contact with the "God" entity who misused his trust and led him down a dark path that resulted in his death. I've always believed TFF was a bunch of good ideas executed badly and the author shows how they might have played them. I do think there's some areas that could have gotten much attention like what happened to T'Prynn after the events of "Amock Time" and the fact that Spock is portrayed as never marrying despite the fact Picard met Sarek at his son's wedding (and Sybok presumably died on Sha'Ka'Ree). Still, she manages to fill in a lot of narrative holes. I was particularly impressed by her incorporation of Saavik's backstory as well as expansion on the character of Valeris. The latter isn't sympathetic at all but impressive in displaying all the nastiness that Spock admits underlies the Vulcan character. In conclusion, this is a great book but if you're not up on DISCOVERY and PICARD then you will miss out on a lot. Fans of the old-school Trek will possibly even think that Captain Kirk and McCoy were short changed as the book glosses over the TOS period. I don't think that's the case and we have massive amounts of information on their relationship from other sources but those looking for that may leave disappointed. I, however, salute her ability to tie classic Trek in with the new.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I don't remember ever not being a Trekkie. First run Next Gen and, later, Voyager were always my shows...I was too young for TOS and too easily bored for DS9, although I later went back to, and enjoyed very much, both of them. Like a lot of people, the outsider characters Data, Odo and Spock were the ones who fascinated me, and I jumped at the chance to read this autobiography of Spock. This isn't a book for someone who's not at least vaguely familiar with the original series, the movies, and Dis I don't remember ever not being a Trekkie. First run Next Gen and, later, Voyager were always my shows...I was too young for TOS and too easily bored for DS9, although I later went back to, and enjoyed very much, both of them. Like a lot of people, the outsider characters Data, Odo and Spock were the ones who fascinated me, and I jumped at the chance to read this autobiography of Spock. This isn't a book for someone who's not at least vaguely familiar with the original series, the movies, and Discovery, one of the newer series. It references all of those, but only in passing, so if you don't already know the background, you're likely to be very confused. You should also be at least a little familiar with the first of the three most recent movies, as this is written just before that and makes reference to it. I did love the touch of this being written to Captain Picard, the man who probably now knows Spock better than anyone else alive. It's so clever and perfect, although it did lead to a couple of "As you know, (explanation of something Picard knows but we the readers don't)" moments. I can forgive that, though, because it's such an inspired idea overall. (Also for the image of Spock and Picard sitting in the vineyard at La Barre, which I adore.) The tone is firmly Spockian throughout, not surprising as this is an older Spock looking back, not an accumulation of then-current writings. I was surprised that he mentioned Jim Kirk so very little, but Jim does better than most of the other original crew. Only McCoy is mentioned in any kind of detail, and I was a little sad about that. However, from Spock's perspective, those were crewmates for a very small portion of his life, so I can understand it a bit. Overall I really enjoyed reading this; it's clever, it's fun, and it gave Saavik an ending to her story, which I thought was fantastic. I'm off to look for more from the same series now!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    The life of Spock of Vulcan has perhaps been overshadowed by that of his contemporary, James T. Kirk, but Spock has a unique and fascinating life story which has many lessons to teach potential students. From his Starfleet career to his later life of service in diplomacy, Spock has helped to define the Federation's golden era. McCormack's editorial notes say that she hopes she has captured Spock's voice and, in many respects, she has done just done that. While reading this book, it is difficult n The life of Spock of Vulcan has perhaps been overshadowed by that of his contemporary, James T. Kirk, but Spock has a unique and fascinating life story which has many lessons to teach potential students. From his Starfleet career to his later life of service in diplomacy, Spock has helped to define the Federation's golden era. McCormack's editorial notes say that she hopes she has captured Spock's voice and, in many respects, she has done just done that. While reading this book, it is difficult not to hear Nimoy's measured baritone as Spock outlines the lessons he has learned throughout his long life.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gautam Bhatia

    Spock's voice comes through beautifully in this. Spock's voice comes through beautifully in this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josef D.

    It was ok, however… I started off mostly enjoying this book until they had to include Discovery. I am no fan of Discovery and to me it threw the whole tone of the book off. I do no recommend this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book is an absolute must for any fan of Star Trek and any fan of Spok. I watched this show as a little kid with my dad, then watched the JJ Abrams' movies. (Don't get me started on the second one) and watched some of the shows on Paramount+. I really like Star Trek This book added an in depth look at one of the series' most beloved characters. We get to learn so much about Spok, his family, his friends. His time as a cadet and onward. The inclusion of his sister Michael was really nice, love This book is an absolute must for any fan of Star Trek and any fan of Spok. I watched this show as a little kid with my dad, then watched the JJ Abrams' movies. (Don't get me started on the second one) and watched some of the shows on Paramount+. I really like Star Trek This book added an in depth look at one of the series' most beloved characters. We get to learn so much about Spok, his family, his friends. His time as a cadet and onward. The inclusion of his sister Michael was really nice, loved that and the book is addicting. I couldn't put it down even though my eyes were burning as I read. I will absolutely buy this book for myself and the Star Trek fans I have in my life. They'll appreciate a chance to get a look under the calm veneer of Spok to see what really made him tick. To see what his childhood was like. And the intricacies and difficulties he faced growing up half-Human and half-Vulcan. And with what happened after his sister joined the family. There's a lot I can't say because they would be spoilers for the book. One thing I can say is that the author handles this so well, the character and his life, with such respect, that it felt like I was reading about a real person. Not a character from a TV show, but a real living and breathing person. It comes out 9/14/2021. Buy it you won't regret it. Get it for the trekkie in your life. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Winsor

    This book purports to be Spock’s examination of his life as he nears death. It’s divided into sections which are each identified by an important person in that period of Spock’s life: Michael, T’pring, Sybok, Surak, Pike, Bones, etc. The book is mostly narration, with only its most important moments rendered in scenes. Also Spock spends a substantial amount of space examining his life in philosophical terms. I suspect that someone whose not already familiar with the character will find the book This book purports to be Spock’s examination of his life as he nears death. It’s divided into sections which are each identified by an important person in that period of Spock’s life: Michael, T’pring, Sybok, Surak, Pike, Bones, etc. The book is mostly narration, with only its most important moments rendered in scenes. Also Spock spends a substantial amount of space examining his life in philosophical terms. I suspect that someone whose not already familiar with the character will find the book hard going, but if you’re a Spock fan, you should enjoy this close look at him and the people who mattered to him.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Leah Charifson

    If you are eagerly awaiting the long anticipated The Autobiography of Mr. Spock, may I suggest you save your money and take it out of the library when it lands there. I pre-ordered the book from Amazon three years ago. The publication date was pushed back and pushed back until 2021. I now know why. The author and publisher needed to watch all the variations of Star Trek so they could be included in this text. True, Spock has been the anchor pin for all the incarnations of TOS. Unfortunately, the e If you are eagerly awaiting the long anticipated The Autobiography of Mr. Spock, may I suggest you save your money and take it out of the library when it lands there. I pre-ordered the book from Amazon three years ago. The publication date was pushed back and pushed back until 2021. I now know why. The author and publisher needed to watch all the variations of Star Trek so they could be included in this text. True, Spock has been the anchor pin for all the incarnations of TOS. Unfortunately, the editor/author, in my humble opinion selected the wrong genre for Spock's story. This 98% narrative would have been better served as a nonfiction analysis such as comprise our tech manuals and concordances. To my mind, it has failed as an autobiography, and not because it clashes in so many places with my personal interpretation of this character. To my mind, and I'm prepared to be corrected, an autobiography is a chronological series of stories about one's life. Each story should contain all the elements of stories: characters, setting, conflict, theme, dialogue, etc. This book is divided not chronologically but by individual characters that supposedly had an effect on Spock. It is all tell and virtually no show. It is in fact, a rehash of everything we've seen on the screen since Trek aired. And somehow, still, it managed to miss capturing Spock's voice. Spock does not usually make grammatical errors, for one thing and if Spock had proofread his own work, he would have corrected the multiple typos in the Kindle edition. (I know, I know. I'm one to talk, especially about my first earliest attempts at stories. But these things kept throwing me out of the book when I came across them.) To its credit, I managed to read the book through. This is unusual for me because if a story doesn't capture me in the first page, I'm likely to put it to the side and never get back to it. But… Spock. I kept reading and hoping that I would learn something new about my beloved character. It never happened. An author intrusion on the next to the last page in which Spock writes about an event that is not yet happened, sounded the death knell for this manuscript. For me, that is. A suspicion that had been growing within me was confirmed at the very end of the book. The author/editor, Una McCormack, borrowed liberally from pro novels and some fanzines, most notably Jean Lorrah's Amanda, in that Spock's mom had become an adept. She also included as an addendum, McCoy's recipe for beans, sans the special ingredient, and his recipe for a mint julep. What? Why? Which is exactly what I asked myself when I closed my Kindle on this two out of five stars book. (The above is my opinion. You are at liberty to disagree with me." Please note: Writing as Leslye Lilker, I have been a fan of Star Trek since Sept. 1966 and am the creator of the recntly-revived Sahaj Universe, as well as an author, editor, and publisher of the fanzine IDIC. Currently, I am a retired HS English/ESL teacher. .

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steven R. McEvoy

    This is the fourth volume in this series of Star Trek Autobiographies. To date they have only done captains. The first two written by David A. Goodman were on Kirk (2015) and Picard (2017). And in 2021 two more have been released a few weeks apart by Una McCormack on Janeway and the first volume not on a captain Mr. Spock. And I jumped the Janeway one to get right to the volume on Mr. Spock. I thoroughly enjoyed the volume on Kirk, and was surprised by the volume on Picard. And I eagerly await v This is the fourth volume in this series of Star Trek Autobiographies. To date they have only done captains. The first two written by David A. Goodman were on Kirk (2015) and Picard (2017). And in 2021 two more have been released a few weeks apart by Una McCormack on Janeway and the first volume not on a captain Mr. Spock. And I jumped the Janeway one to get right to the volume on Mr. Spock. I thoroughly enjoyed the volume on Kirk, and was surprised by the volume on Picard. And I eagerly await volumes on Sisko, Archer, even Worf, Riker or Data who all became captains in their own right. And would love for them to go back and do a volume on Pike. But I come away from this one with mixed feelings. Thios book begins with these words: “It has long been my custom, before embarking upon a great voyage, to set my affairs in order. I am motivated, in part, by a desire to make this as straightforward and painless as possible for the executors of my will. But the practice is also—perhaps substantially—for my own benefit, providing an opportunity to reflect upon what has gone before. Nevertheless, although i began writing the story of my life once before, this was never completed, and i find that i contemplate resuming work on this with some trepidation. To revisit years and people long gone, to reflect upon what has been learned—who among us, even the most ascetic, after a long life filled with incident, would not find this task a challenge? Still, i leave very soon upon an uncertain mission, and i cannot leave this book unwritten.” The writings is well done. And it is presented as am “t’san a’lat, which translates (I give a rough translation here; certain nuances are, necessarily, lost) a “wisdom book”. It is the physical manifestation of the lifelong practice of t’san s’at, the intellectual deconstruction of emotional patterns in which every Vulcan engages in order to turn impulse into considered action.” It is written to and left to Picard. And there are many personal notes to Picard along the way. But overall I was underwhelmed by this volume over all. Maybe it was because it was written as a t’san a’lat. Maybe it was trying to be too Vulcan. And maybe it was just so Spock, but not the Spock I was expecting. The chapters and sections in the volume are: Point Of Entry—2387: Shikahr, Vulcan Part One Ro’fori—Information—2230 –2254: Amanda Michael T’pring Sybok Surak Part Two Fai-Tukh—Knowledge—2254—2293: Angel Pike Enterprise “Bones” Saavik Part Three Kau—Wisdom—2293—2387: Valeris Pardek Sarek Picard Jim Point Of Exit—2387: Approaching The Romulan Border Leonard Mccoy’s Bean Stew Leonard Mccoy’s Mint Julep Editorial Note Both the recipes at the end look really good. I think for me the hardest part of this book was that there was so little about James T. Kirk, and that there was so much about Bones. I am glad that I read it. But of the three in the series to date it is my least favourite, and overall left me feeling underwhelmed an somewhat disappointed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    George Leclair

    I'll begin by saying that I enjoyed this book. But I didn't enjoy it as much as I'd hoped to. For some background, I picked up the autobiographies of Kirk and Picard as soon as they were available. Those were written by a different author. I enjoyed both immensely and have re-read them each a couple of times since. I've been eagerly anticipating the Mr. Spock edition since it was announced and subsequently delayed, and then switched from one author to Ms. McCormack. When I finally got my hands on I'll begin by saying that I enjoyed this book. But I didn't enjoy it as much as I'd hoped to. For some background, I picked up the autobiographies of Kirk and Picard as soon as they were available. Those were written by a different author. I enjoyed both immensely and have re-read them each a couple of times since. I've been eagerly anticipating the Mr. Spock edition since it was announced and subsequently delayed, and then switched from one author to Ms. McCormack. When I finally got my hands on this book I found it was just... ok. At no point in the book was I able to clearly "hear" Mr. Spock. I tried imagining the words in the voice of young Leonard Nimoy, old Leonard Nimoy, Ethan Peck... none of it worked and the words did not feel like they had been spoken by the character. This was somewhat of an issue with the Janeway book but not an issue in the least with the autobiographies of either Kirk or Picard. That, more than anything, diminished my enjoyment of this piece. The writing is quite good, except that the author has a tendency to repeat words often. Alacrity, for example. I didn't count but I suspect that the phrase, "with alacrity" is used nearly ten times. After a while, you tire of reading it. Sort of like when Tom Clancy became obsessed with the word "gaggle" and it appeared all over the place. What I DO like is how Ms. McCormack handled the various "sources" for Mr. Spock's life. She weaved the new material from Discovery into the book which I very much appreciated. This is tough for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is the fact that we are about to have a whole new series showing new adventures with Spock. Similarly, I feel like the events we see in all other aspects of Spock's life have been weaved together very well. Overall, I am happy with this purchase and it is a fine addition to my collection. Just not my favorite,

  13. 5 out of 5

    RumBelle

    I have waited years for this book, and the publication date just kept getting pushed back. After having now finished it, I can say unequivocally that the wait was worth it. Spock has always been one of my favorite characters, and this book was thoroughly enjoyable. Infinite diversity in infinite combinations. It was how this book started, and in a way how it ended, and it summed up not only Spock's life portrayed in this book, but also how the book was put together. Many different versions of Sp I have waited years for this book, and the publication date just kept getting pushed back. After having now finished it, I can say unequivocally that the wait was worth it. Spock has always been one of my favorite characters, and this book was thoroughly enjoyable. Infinite diversity in infinite combinations. It was how this book started, and in a way how it ended, and it summed up not only Spock's life portrayed in this book, but also how the book was put together. Many different versions of Spock's story, that have been shown on TV and in film came together to weave his life. We began with his childhood, a childhood that included Michael Burnham. We then saw him progress to joining Starfleet, assisting Captain Pike to Talos IV and serving with Captain Kirk. Then the story progressed to include several moments from the various Original series films. In addition, we saw his experience with Jean Luc on Romulus, as well as a reference to the synth war that influenced the Picard series. The book ended with Spock's journey to set off the Red Matter, as we saw in the Star Trek reboot. In between, and at the heart of this book was family. Not only his flesh and blood family, but also others who came to fill that role over time. Other such as Jim, Bones and Saavik. Intermingled with this was Vulcan philosophy and history, and how much of that shaped Spock's life. I will say, I found it a little odd that, overall throughout the novel, Jim Kirk did not have nearly as big a presence as I had anticipated. He spoke more to Jean Luc than he did to Jim, though that is due to Jean Luc's connection to the book. Only at the end was a chapter devoted to Jim Kirk. This book was not fast paced, or exciting, but then it's "author" was neither of those things. It was written in such a way to really evoke Spock. The man, and the Vulcan.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

    I'll start with the negative and end with the positive. The book is cheaply bound. The paper is thin and the book feels like the cheap binding they used to use with the book of the month club selections. (Remember those?) The writing: oh, gosh. Was the author paid by the comma? I've never seen so many run-on sentences in my life! It reminded me of Arthur Conan Doyle's writing: the stories he wrote that were from the point of view of Holmes himself. That writing was typical of the Victorian era. B I'll start with the negative and end with the positive. The book is cheaply bound. The paper is thin and the book feels like the cheap binding they used to use with the book of the month club selections. (Remember those?) The writing: oh, gosh. Was the author paid by the comma? I've never seen so many run-on sentences in my life! It reminded me of Arthur Conan Doyle's writing: the stories he wrote that were from the point of view of Holmes himself. That writing was typical of the Victorian era. But, we live in the 21st century and the story takes place 200 years in the future. So, the writing style is frankly too verbose for an ascetic Vulcan. Honestly, I got impatient and skipped parts of the book. Additionally, way too much TNG and not enough TOS. The book goes on endlessly about Romulans and whatever...enough already! And Spock has an adopted sister? No. Nope. Nada. Bad idea. Here's what I considered good about the book: McCoy is written perfectly. The book captures his bad temper, harsh candor, love of his family, medical talents, and loyalty to his friends. Kirk is also well described and the book clears up misconceptions about him. This was a good idea since some of this is discussed on social media and this book handles it very well. But there is only one short chapter about Kirk, which is ridiculous. Kirk was one of Spock's most important friends and he only gets one short chapter? I did like the idea that Spock has never visited his grave, the book suggesting it's simply too painful. And Amanda's death is also well described, moving and totally believable. In summary: I've read ALOT of ST books in my life. Some are outstanding, such as the Alan Dean Foster adaptions. Some are okay, such as some of the movie novelizations. This one is okay but not good and I doubt I'll re-read it as I do my favorites.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ben Dutton

    Una Mccormack's The Autobiography of Mr Spock tells, as its title suggests, the life story of one of Star Trek's most iconic characters. It takes us on a whirlwind trip through many of the key moments and many of the smaller moments of this great characters life. It draws on the Original Series, The Next Generation and onwards into Discovery and Picard to take its stories, as well as details from other Star Trek novels. One does not need to know these various sources to appreciate this novel, bu Una Mccormack's The Autobiography of Mr Spock tells, as its title suggests, the life story of one of Star Trek's most iconic characters. It takes us on a whirlwind trip through many of the key moments and many of the smaller moments of this great characters life. It draws on the Original Series, The Next Generation and onwards into Discovery and Picard to take its stories, as well as details from other Star Trek novels. One does not need to know these various sources to appreciate this novel, but it does help. The story is without tension, ultimately. We know Spock is writing this near the end of his life, long in the future. But Mccormack is not interested in creating tension, she is interested in bringing us into the mind of this Vulcan, letting us hear his thoughts and perspectives on events we have not seen or heard from him before on, and letting the reader luxuriate in the almost perfect recreation of that familiar, Nimoy-voice. She really does capture the tone, inflection inflection depth of character. This is a character story, with shards of wisdom cracking through. It will never top the list of best Star Trek novels, but it is a fascinating and beautiful wallow, and if you love Spock you will take a lot away with you. Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for an ARC.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leona

    Spock has lived a life that is so unique and one that encompasses so many roles of consequence that you sometimes don’t see the complicated man behind the impressive reputation. In this autobiography, Spock has produced his own version of the Vulcan t’san a’lat, a book of his reflections & words of wisdom about the people so important in his life. After all he’s not a typical Vulcan or Human, so his autobiography should be something in between both cultures giving the reader a glance at what & w Spock has lived a life that is so unique and one that encompasses so many roles of consequence that you sometimes don’t see the complicated man behind the impressive reputation. In this autobiography, Spock has produced his own version of the Vulcan t’san a’lat, a book of his reflections & words of wisdom about the people so important in his life. After all he’s not a typical Vulcan or Human, so his autobiography should be something in between both cultures giving the reader a glance at what & who is truly meaningful to him. My emotions were front & centre reading this book and McCormack has given life to the majestic Leonard Nimoy once again. I heard his voice in every personal revelation, every sentence, in fact. The idea of Spock sharing his history with a trusted friend who he respected was a good way to approach the idea of talking about his past. It seems fitting for the character and made the book even more enjoyable. McCormack has brought one of my favourite characters back and in a way that was fitting for such a legendary personality. I loved it! I received a copy from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for a review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alicea

    As I was shelving one day, I happened to come across this book. (Imagine my surprise when I discovered there are other books in this quasi series!) This is a (obviously) fictionalized autobiographical account of Spock's life. He focuses on several characters from the various TV iterations and films who had an impact on his life. There are some surprising choices in my opinion but in the end I think they made since as part of the narrative whole. It's framed as a look back on his life right up un As I was shelving one day, I happened to come across this book. (Imagine my surprise when I discovered there are other books in this quasi series!) This is a (obviously) fictionalized autobiographical account of Spock's life. He focuses on several characters from the various TV iterations and films who had an impact on his life. There are some surprising choices in my opinion but in the end I think they made since as part of the narrative whole. It's framed as a look back on his life right up until that fateful mission to create a black hole and save Romulus (the beginning of the Star Trek reboot). His accounts are written much like a diary but are directed to a specific individual. (Don't worry, no spoilers here.) It was so much fun to read and reminded me of the joy I felt when I read the Vulcan travel guide last year. It brings this iconic character to life in an immersive way that causes the reader to forget that he's a fictional character. I really think if your a Trekkie you'll enjoy this one...and you might want to start looking for the other Trek autobiographies as well. ;-)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Una McCormack brilliantly weaves together various threads from the complex continuity that makes up 55 years of Star Trek to tell the life story (at least so far) of Spock of Vulcan. It reads very much like it comes straight from Spock's own pen (or data pad) and I could easily hear the words in Leonard Nimoy's voice. It's no small feat to bring together plot points from across the Trek Universe including Star Trek: TOS and Star Trek: TNG, as well as the original movies, but we get details from Una McCormack brilliantly weaves together various threads from the complex continuity that makes up 55 years of Star Trek to tell the life story (at least so far) of Spock of Vulcan. It reads very much like it comes straight from Spock's own pen (or data pad) and I could easily hear the words in Leonard Nimoy's voice. It's no small feat to bring together plot points from across the Trek Universe including Star Trek: TOS and Star Trek: TNG, as well as the original movies, but we get details from the Kelvin Timeline movies, the newer shows Discovery and Picard and even the Star Trek Animated Series amongst others. It wasn't just retelling those stories in chronological order though, it was pulling them to together to create a narrative of a man's life and how those experiences made him into what he was. Very enjoyable and on par with "real" biographies I have read. (Special Note: I received an digital ARC from Titan Books)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    The Autobiography of Mr. Spock (Kindle Edition) by Una McCormack Looking into the difficult life that was Spock had with his heritage that made the man he was is amazing. Seeing how he struggles with his sense of self, his identity, and his life goals. More explanation to the psychological problems hinted at in the movies and the episodes. This book is a life story, told to Jean Luc Picard. Its interesting how much is revealed. As you see how he views the relationships we have seen grow on the sil The Autobiography of Mr. Spock (Kindle Edition) by Una McCormack Looking into the difficult life that was Spock had with his heritage that made the man he was is amazing. Seeing how he struggles with his sense of self, his identity, and his life goals. More explanation to the psychological problems hinted at in the movies and the episodes. This book is a life story, told to Jean Luc Picard. Its interesting how much is revealed. As you see how he views the relationships we have seen grow on the silver screen, and boob tube. I found this remarkably enduring as Spock questions the logic of the Vulcan society, their theology and affect on the universe. He questions some of the decisions of his superiors, and his friends. Shows the regrets he has for the loss and pain of the adventures he has been on. This book makes the reader understand the depth of the character brought to life by Lenard Neomi.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scott Williams

    I have mixed feelings about this. It was originally going to be published in 2018 and “edited” by David Goodman. They must have pulled it to be re-written when so much of Spock’s childhood was dealt with on Discovery. I would be really interested to read the original version if it was completed. For me, Spock’s voice is not quite right. I know it’s meant to be a kinder, gentler Spock who’s more at peace with his emotions near the end of his life but it’s just a little too emotional for me. I thin I have mixed feelings about this. It was originally going to be published in 2018 and “edited” by David Goodman. They must have pulled it to be re-written when so much of Spock’s childhood was dealt with on Discovery. I would be really interested to read the original version if it was completed. For me, Spock’s voice is not quite right. I know it’s meant to be a kinder, gentler Spock who’s more at peace with his emotions near the end of his life but it’s just a little too emotional for me. I think the story is just fine. McCormack does a great job of integrating the Discovery elements. The one thing that’s missing is any discussion of Spock’s marriage. Picard tells Riker that he attended Spock’s wedding. Since this book is written to Picard it seems odd that this part of Spock’s life would be missing. My head canon was always that Spock married Saavik, but that’s not what happens here.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Myarn

    The Autobiography of Mr. Spock by Una Mccormank 4.5 stars A slightly slow, but engrossing autobiography of a beloved fictional character. This covers the life of Spock, son of Sarek and Amanda - Starfleet Officer, scientist, explorer and diplomat. From his childhood to the events preceding the reboot of the Star Trek franchise and the "Kelvin" universe. It covers the Original Series, the Next Generation, Star Trek Discovery and barely touches the J.J. Abrams Star Trek reboot. As part of the "Auto The Autobiography of Mr. Spock by Una Mccormank 4.5 stars A slightly slow, but engrossing autobiography of a beloved fictional character. This covers the life of Spock, son of Sarek and Amanda - Starfleet Officer, scientist, explorer and diplomat. From his childhood to the events preceding the reboot of the Star Trek franchise and the "Kelvin" universe. It covers the Original Series, the Next Generation, Star Trek Discovery and barely touches the J.J. Abrams Star Trek reboot. As part of the "Autobiography series" (Kirk, Picard, Janeway) it shows the main points and make reference to some of the best Star Trek novels that focused on Vulcan (i.e. Diana Duane's Spock's World) I enjoyed this book very much and read it in one reading. Bravo, I would like a McCoy one next. Thank you Netgalley and Titan Books for this ARC.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Randee Green

    Written in his own words and directed to Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the legendary Mr. Spock shares his life story in a t’san a’lat—a traditional text that Vulcans write towards the end of their lives as a way to pass on their wisdom and experiences to future generations. Spock tells Captain Picard (and the readers) about his childhood on Vulcan, his time spent at the Starfleet Academy as both a student and a teacher, his adventures on the Enterprise under Captain Pike and Captain Kirk, and his dip Written in his own words and directed to Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the legendary Mr. Spock shares his life story in a t’san a’lat—a traditional text that Vulcans write towards the end of their lives as a way to pass on their wisdom and experiences to future generations. Spock tells Captain Picard (and the readers) about his childhood on Vulcan, his time spent at the Starfleet Academy as both a student and a teacher, his adventures on the Enterprise under Captain Pike and Captain Kirk, and his diplomatic career working with the Klingons and the Romulans. Along the way, the reader is introduced to Spock's human family, his Vulcan father and their exalted ancestors, his many friends, and his enemies. We also relive the defining moments that made Spock who he is. While I am not a die-hard Trekkie, I did spend my formative years watching reruns of "Star Trek: The Original Series." I'll admit that Kirk was my favorite. But I was also a fan of Spock. When I saw that THE AUOBIOGRAPHY OF MR. SPOCK would be released, I knew I had to check it out. While not as exciting or bombastic as THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF JAMES T. KIRK, Spock's autobiography is still an interesting read. A bit slow-moving at times, Spock's is a subdued story about an admirable and intellectual Vulcan. It is a must read for fans of "Star Trek: The Original Series." Live long and prosper. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I'm not a fan of the original Star Trek series (sorry!), but I did love the films as a kid and Spock was always my favourite character. I think I like him even more now! "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" is incredibly well-written, and really brings an extra dimension to this well-loved character. This is a book I would enjoy reading over and over again... and I must check out the rest of the series too! Live long and prosper! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was writ I'm not a fan of the original Star Trek series (sorry!), but I did love the films as a kid and Spock was always my favourite character. I think I like him even more now! "The Autobiography of Mr. Spock" is incredibly well-written, and really brings an extra dimension to this well-loved character. This is a book I would enjoy reading over and over again... and I must check out the rest of the series too! Live long and prosper! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andy Parkes

    I've really enjoyed this series of books doing autobiographies of various Star Trek characters. While reading this one I couldn't help but hear it in Spock's voice! I'd recommend watching Star Trek Discovery (end of season 2) before getting into this otherwise a big chunk of Spock's childhood will make little to no sense Other than that, very enjoyable. It spends a huge chunk of time in his early years and his later years and not enough touching some of the famous bits in the middle but if this i I've really enjoyed this series of books doing autobiographies of various Star Trek characters. While reading this one I couldn't help but hear it in Spock's voice! I'd recommend watching Star Trek Discovery (end of season 2) before getting into this otherwise a big chunk of Spock's childhood will make little to no sense Other than that, very enjoyable. It spends a huge chunk of time in his early years and his later years and not enough touching some of the famous bits in the middle but if this is meant to round out the story of Spock you can understand that.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd Matthew Thompson

    Una McCormack has quickly become one of the most amazing Star Trek authors, brilliantly orchestrating major key stories in the Star Trek universe as it expands and weaves its many parts together. She moved me in Picard's The Last Best Hope, and has done it again with one of the most beloved--and my favorite--characters, Spock of Vulcan. Such a life, such a multi-faceted character that shows growth and evolution inspiring to us all as we strive toward unification in our own world. Thank you so mu Una McCormack has quickly become one of the most amazing Star Trek authors, brilliantly orchestrating major key stories in the Star Trek universe as it expands and weaves its many parts together. She moved me in Picard's The Last Best Hope, and has done it again with one of the most beloved--and my favorite--characters, Spock of Vulcan. Such a life, such a multi-faceted character that shows growth and evolution inspiring to us all as we strive toward unification in our own world. Thank you so much, Una! 🖖

  26. 5 out of 5

    S Modi

    It is always compelling to see how a beloved character reflects on his life, the way he struggles with his half human, half Vulcan identity and how someone would reason through his choices in life. Memoirs mirror similar struggles in our own lives and the relationships we have to people. The author does a good job of weaving through his life story and making it an intimate correspondence between him and Jean Luc Picard. An enjoyable read. 3.5 stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve Chmielnik

    I realize that anything that appears on screen (tv, movies and cartoons) becomes Star Trek canon. I also know this Autobiography of Mr Spock was delayed. My guess is it had to be rewritten to include Discovery storyline. My only wish was to read the book as it was originally intended. Either way, I enjoyed reading it immensely.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    It took a bit to write this review as I was on the edge not being sure if I liked it or not. It's quite slow, there're some interesting parts that made me discover new aspects of Spock but I think that his wedding and sentimental life were missing. I think it's a good book but not my cup of tea. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine It took a bit to write this review as I was on the edge not being sure if I liked it or not. It's quite slow, there're some interesting parts that made me discover new aspects of Spock but I think that his wedding and sentimental life were missing. I think it's a good book but not my cup of tea. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Grate

    True to Cannon Ms. McCormack has, again, outdone herself. She captures Stock's voice exquisitely and portrays the office/ambassador in a way that shows her love for the character and the genre. Ill be trying those recipes this evening. True to Cannon Ms. McCormack has, again, outdone herself. She captures Stock's voice exquisitely and portrays the office/ambassador in a way that shows her love for the character and the genre. Ill be trying those recipes this evening.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Wow! I sure hope they continue with these awesome Star Trek sci-fi biographies, and not just with the captains and other main characters but all the other crew as well. This was a fantastic, well-written read.

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