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World War II Battle of Britain: A History From Beginning to End

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World War II Battle of Britain * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The British people had no sooner finished rescuing their trapped army from Dunkirk than they found themselves preparing for an attack from the Germans once again. This time, the Nazi menace struck fr World War II Battle of Britain * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The British people had no sooner finished rescuing their trapped army from Dunkirk than they found themselves preparing for an attack from the Germans once again. This time, the Nazi menace struck from the air, as Hitler’s Luftwaffe bombed the British in an attempt to break their spirit and force Great Britain to accept peace terms. But as the skies above London filled with the German planes, the Royal Air Force pilots, alerted by radar, flew to intercept them. The Luftwaffe had started the Battle of Britain confident that the RAF was no match for German aircraft and skill, but the pilots of the RAF, the people of England, and the bulldog tenacity of Prime Minister Winston Churchill did not intend to give way. Inside you will read about... ✓ Battle for the Skies ✓ The Home Front ✓ The London Blitz ✓ Churchill at War ✓ The End of the Battle of Britain And much more! The heroism of the RAF and the fortitude of the British people turned Germany’s certain victory into defeat, forcing Hitler to abandon his plans to invade England. “We shall never surrender,” Churchill vowed, and his words rallied a nation, delivering a blow to the Nazi war machine that would, in the end, prove to be a turning point in World War II.


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World War II Battle of Britain * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The British people had no sooner finished rescuing their trapped army from Dunkirk than they found themselves preparing for an attack from the Germans once again. This time, the Nazi menace struck fr World War II Battle of Britain * * *Download for FREE on Kindle Unlimited + Free BONUS Inside!* * * Read On Your Computer, MAC, Smartphone, Kindle Reader, iPad, or Tablet. The British people had no sooner finished rescuing their trapped army from Dunkirk than they found themselves preparing for an attack from the Germans once again. This time, the Nazi menace struck from the air, as Hitler’s Luftwaffe bombed the British in an attempt to break their spirit and force Great Britain to accept peace terms. But as the skies above London filled with the German planes, the Royal Air Force pilots, alerted by radar, flew to intercept them. The Luftwaffe had started the Battle of Britain confident that the RAF was no match for German aircraft and skill, but the pilots of the RAF, the people of England, and the bulldog tenacity of Prime Minister Winston Churchill did not intend to give way. Inside you will read about... ✓ Battle for the Skies ✓ The Home Front ✓ The London Blitz ✓ Churchill at War ✓ The End of the Battle of Britain And much more! The heroism of the RAF and the fortitude of the British people turned Germany’s certain victory into defeat, forcing Hitler to abandon his plans to invade England. “We shall never surrender,” Churchill vowed, and his words rallied a nation, delivering a blow to the Nazi war machine that would, in the end, prove to be a turning point in World War II.

30 review for World War II Battle of Britain: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Young Kim

    ...Never in the field of human conflict has so much been owed by so many to so few. —Winston Churchill (Kindle Ed. pp. 28-29) ...Two hours after that, a second attack got underway; this one lasted until 4:30 the next morning. For the following 57 days, London would undergo fierce bombing during the period of the Battle of Britain that would come to be known as the Blitz. Much of the city was destroyed by fire from the bombs. During the night, over 170,000 people fled to the underground stations fo ...Never in the field of human conflict has so much been owed by so many to so few. —Winston Churchill (Kindle Ed. pp. 28-29) ...Two hours after that, a second attack got underway; this one lasted until 4:30 the next morning. For the following 57 days, London would undergo fierce bombing during the period of the Battle of Britain that would come to be known as the Blitz. Much of the city was destroyed by fire from the bombs. During the night, over 170,000 people fled to the underground stations for shelter. A school that served as an air raid shelter became a grave as 450 people were killed when a bomb struck it; that was the most deadly single bombing incident during the Blitz. But more was to come. September 15 would later come to be known as Battle of Britain Day, but for the people of Britain, it was the unleashing of Nazi terror from above. The Germans had unwittingly provided the RAF with a bit of a break by switching their methods to bombing London rather than attacking the RAF bases and radar stations. The RAF pilots had used the respite to repair and rest their planes as squadrons were replenished. The head of Fighter Command, Air-Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, had brought planes to the southeast region of England from all over the country. The Germans, however, were convinced that the RAF was nearing the end of its ability to defend the nation... The lines might cause misunderstanding among the readers. Don't misunderstand, folks. The military wasn't just watching the attack with folded arms. While they were conducting the same numbers of sorties, based on the principle, to repel the German aircrafts inside the British territorial air, they could repair their radars, air fields and all sort of damaged facilities because, for the first time since the battle began, they were not "directly" targeted. (Kindle Ed. p. 2) ...The Battle of Britain, the first military engagement fought entirely between enemy air forces, would be the first defeat that the Germans would suffer. But the Battle of Britain was more than a military encounter. It was a test of the human will... While attacking the British mainland Hitler also launched another important attack to take over the Northern African coastline, a vital passage towards the Suez Canal for the mineral-rich Middle East, Indian Ocean and beyond, so the declining British Empire lacked military power to defend its mainland. The very reason of the famous British civilian actions in the beach of Dunkirk is found in this situation. The Battle of Britain thwarted the "rising" German challenge to the existing global order under British naval dominance over the global water passages, which had begun since the Battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo in the early-19th century, by invading its mainland like, in the mid- to late-17th century, then-challenger to the existing order, Bourbon-France, did against the Habsburg-Spain and its old subject (newly independent) Dutch Republic, while the Kingdom of England, not the parliamentary "United" Kingdom of Great Britain yet, was suffering hard from the devastating English Civil War. This German failure pushed Hitler to attack Russia like Napoleon did to get to the other side of the world full of riches and resources the Europeans desired so dearly after his Franco-Spanish Armada was defeated by the United Kingdom Navy Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson in 1805. While the book explains well the meaning of British “unity” among the leaders and the people during the Nazi air raid, which brought them a great victory, it doesn't really explain the "geopolitical" significance of the historic fight that changed the course of history like the Battle of Trafalgar did. Nonetheless, the book demonstrates a great description of the “path” towards the Battle of Britain, helping the readers vividly experience the British psychology before and during the desperate fight. Here’re just a few examples among many: (Kindle Ed. p. 23) “It was terrible last night. We were up for nine hours and the sky was lit by the most lurid glow from the tremendous fires in London. I watched the flames and the planes and the guns and I thought of you and had a terrible feeling that you were in danger. Please, my darling, do not get hurt. Please keep alive for me to come back to you, to love you and look after you and see my beautiful baby again. I am now living without sleep and I suppose you are too, and that is much worse. A peaceful night now seems too remote to be considered.” —Lieutenant John Belsey (Kindle Ed. pp. 26-27) The government was dubious at the prospect of using the underground system tunnels and stations for air raid shelters, but the people of London felt that they were safer underground than above it. The stations were supplied with first aid facilities, chemical toilets, and bunks. There were 124 canteens. Shelter marshals were assigned to provide first aid and assistance if the tunnels flooded. The underground began to be used as a shelter on September 21, 1940. On its busiest night, it sheltered 177,000 people who brought pillows, blankets, sandwiches, and thermoses with them to ride out the bombing attack. Indeed, the book is well-written in simple, plain English describing not only the lives in military actions, but the living condition of the majority civilian population during the German air raid. There are also some errors found to be edited. (Kindle Ed. pp. 25-26) ...and sleep was difficult, if not impossible, inside the shelter. Correction: ...and inside the shelter, sleep was difficult, if not impossible. (Kindle Ed. pp. 28-30) On September 7, 1940, at 4:00 pm, 617 German fighters were escorted by 348 bombers...Targeting London for raids, while it increased the distress for the civilians, also posed problems for the German aircraft. Their escort planes, with limited fuel capacity, only had ten minutes of flying time left by the time they reached their destination, after which they had to turn back home. That left the bombers undefended by fighter escorts... Correction: On September 7, 1940, at 4:00 pm, 348 German bombers were escorted by 617 fighters. (Kindle Ed. pp. 29-30) At 11:00 am on September 15...Germans adapted the Messerschmitts to improve this deficiency, but not until later in the autumn of 1940. British autumn starts in mid to late September: Therefore, correction: "...Soon," the Germans "adopted" the Messerschmitts... And what is the Messerschmitts? It's the name of a German aerospace company, and the Germans "adopted" a new model developed by the company at the time to improve the deficiency. The book needs an explanation of it for the readers. (Kindle Ed. pp. 30-31) The Royal Family did not abandon London, staying in Buckingham Palace when they were not at Windsor Castle visiting princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. During the intense bombing of September 1940, Buckingham Palace was damaged. Bombs landed on the grounds and exploded just 80 yards away from where King George VI and Queen Elizabeth were located in a small sitting room. Elizabeth, mother of Queen Elizabeth II, had already explained the family’s position when others urged the Royal Family to escape to Canada for their safety... That's the leadership! Anyways, correction: The king and his queen did not abandon London... What, the princesses were not considered as royal family members? A few more errors have been found, but not that many, and they don't seriously disturb the read. Despite some lines that need an editing work, the book appears to deserve minimum 4 stars as a complete product. (Kindle Ed. p. 27) The Blitz was a time of great travail for the British public. But it was also a period of national unity, as the civilians worked together, confident of their purpose and cohesive in their resistance to the common enemy. During the eight months of the Blitz, the Luftwaffe dropped 50,000 tons of bombs in its attack upon the British civilians. Over a million people were left homeless, and more than 40,000 were killed. This was the first time in Europe that a civilian population was punished by bombing on such a massive scale. Not to mention the development of industrial weapons of mass destruction such as machinegun that had caused the scary number of KIAs in the field, literally hundreds of thousands every day during the previous round of the global war... Yet, at the end of the 19th century they believed that, with their hearts full of optimistic hope, this kind of "inhuman" weapons wouldn't be really used for large-scale wars in the new coming century of "peace and interdependency." How about our times now? Y’all really think it won’t happen again? Well, I, too, want to believe it, but... (Kindle Ed. p. 10) ...Great Britain’s military scoffed at the notion that the Germans would be able to successfully invade Norway, and the Norwegians trusted that the British Navy would assist if the Germans did attempt an invasion. (Kindle Ed. p. 11) The surprise attack by the Germans was so effective that the local commander at the port of Narvik thought the ships were from the British Navy coming to help... (Kindle Ed. pp. 11-12) The Scandinavian countries were not Hitler’s ultimate target, but they were strategically significant. Occupying Denmark would provide Germany with naval bases, and it would protect the iron-ore shipments from Sweden that Germany needed. The German explanation for its invasion of the two countries was sanitized to make the claim that Germany was protecting Denmark and Norway against what it described as the aggression of the Allied powers. Belgium was next. Belgian neutrality was ignored, as it had been in the First World War. The Germans sent their divisions, paratroopers, and air gliders to conquer Belgium. The Belgians did not give up without a fight, but after 18 days, the military surrendered. Ya both heard it, Taiwan and South Korea? The history tells a good lesson to us today facing another possible global war between the old global hegemon and a rising “giant” challenger. So we better prepare for war if we want to avoid it. Don't tell me I didn't warn y'all. (Kindle Ed. p. 10) “Britain and France had to choose between war and dishonor. They chose dishonor. They will have war.” —Winston Churchill (Kindle Ed. p. 17) ...Even though the Germans dispatched the free nations of Europe with seeming ease, Churchill felt a sense of relief. Later, he would write, “At last I had authority to give directions over the whole scene. I felt as if I were walking with destiny, and that all my past life had been but a preparation for this hour and this trial.” There's no argument that the book, despite its short length, is super informative and helpful. It clearly informs the readers the reason why the British people under the unprecedented attack and fear were to win the fight, so that I am now reading this English book, not a German book of the event, writing a review of the book in English while staying in a far-away land from England as our world speaks, not German, but English as its official international language.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pritam Patil

    Had seen Dunkirk movie, now I know the history Good short book. Know the turn of tide when Germany attacked GB and how Churchill was important during the blitz.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    The Nazis had taken over almost all of Europe and there next target was England. This book deals iwth the period of time during which the Nazi air forces attempted to bomb the English to the point where they would come to the negotiating table. The book goes into how there was virtually no bombing for 'the phony war' and how this tactic changed to intense bombing of England, particularly of London. The book discusses other aspects of the war. It points out that some 40,000 civilians in England we The Nazis had taken over almost all of Europe and there next target was England. This book deals iwth the period of time during which the Nazi air forces attempted to bomb the English to the point where they would come to the negotiating table. The book goes into how there was virtually no bombing for 'the phony war' and how this tactic changed to intense bombing of England, particularly of London. The book discusses other aspects of the war. It points out that some 40,000 civilians in England were killed during the bombing raids and it also covers how the British fighter pilots managed to save the country. The types of shelters are also covered and how many people sought shelter in the undergrounds. The book does a good job giving a concise history of what amounts to the Nazis trying to slaughter civilians.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ahbet

    Hourly History does it again Easy to follow, gives all the major events, dates and players. Anyone interested in learning about history, this is the place to start. Just the bare bones facts. A perfect starting place - it makes it much easier to tackle headier history books later. These books are always the perfect place to learn history without having to spend hours upon hours doing so.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Muñoz

    Valentía y resistencia admirable de un pueblo Es admirable la valentía con la que el pueblo británico enfrentó en el sexenio del 39 al 45 del siglo pasado, los ataques de los nazis. Hoy podrá resultar fácil narrarlo, más que difícil debió ser vivirlo. Una narrativa breve e interesante, de un período de la historia tan difícil.

  6. 4 out of 5

    jparvinjr

    Excellent,great piece of reading. The battle of Britain has always fascinated me, haven't read much about it,watch several videos, the books and the videos tell the stories of the people of Great Britain and how they won the Battle of Britian. Excellent,great piece of reading. The battle of Britain has always fascinated me, haven't read much about it,watch several videos, the books and the videos tell the stories of the people of Great Britain and how they won the Battle of Britian.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Mihalchick

    Another great book This is another great book in the series. Before this book I never realized the extent of the damage and casualties the British people endured. As are all the others in the series, It's well researched and speaks plainly. Another great book This is another great book in the series. Before this book I never realized the extent of the damage and casualties the British people endured. As are all the others in the series, It's well researched and speaks plainly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Summer Hurst

    Battle of Britian Some parts were good getting details and such however as always with these books personal bias of the writers and publishers without calling it thus, gets in the way especially toward the end

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Acharyya

    Short read on a big event Nice concise booklet on a very important Battle of WWII. Written in lucid and simple language. Must read for anyone interested in history and especially in aerial warfare. I wish writer had given more information about the battle.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Passingham

    Not much to say really. A reasonable introduction to the subject but several very salient points were not even mentioned and much wartime propaganda was reinforced and presented as fact

  11. 4 out of 5

    Renee Svendsen

    Great overview - recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Guy

    A GOOD READ! It's a quick read, only 40 pages, paints a picture of life in London that is incredible. Thanks for opening the window to the world the Londoners lived during WWII A GOOD READ! It's a quick read, only 40 pages, paints a picture of life in London that is incredible. Thanks for opening the window to the world the Londoners lived during WWII

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joe D. Mayfield

    Britain’s Finest Hour Great synopsis of the Battle of Britain. I enjoyed reading this and believe it to be very informative and accurate.

  14. 5 out of 5

    DEBrianKelley

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Towler

  16. 4 out of 5

    srinivas k reddy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caren Reed

  18. 4 out of 5

    Philip Rogers

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ron Ireland

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda Younger

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hazel

  22. 4 out of 5

    William R. Keller

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tami Campbell-Bishop

  24. 5 out of 5

    michael f bocchinfuso

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Davies

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nagaraj

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Ille

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hermie Family

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stelios

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

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