Hot Best Seller

Saints of Hysteria: A Half-Century of Collaborative American Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

Collaborative poetry — poems written by one or more people — grew out of word games played by French surrealists in the 1920s. It was taken up a decade later by Japan’s Vou Club and then by Charles Henri Ford, who created the chainpoem, composed by poets who mailed their lines all over the world. After WW II, the Beat writers’ collaborative experiments resulted in the famo Collaborative poetry — poems written by one or more people — grew out of word games played by French surrealists in the 1920s. It was taken up a decade later by Japan’s Vou Club and then by Charles Henri Ford, who created the chainpoem, composed by poets who mailed their lines all over the world. After WW II, the Beat writers’ collaborative experiments resulted in the famous Pull My Daisy. The concept was embraced in the 1970s by feminist poets as a way to find a collective female voice. Yet, for all its rich history, virtually no collections of collaborative poetry exist. This exhilarating anthology remedies the omission. Featured are poems by two, four, even as many as 18 people in a dizzying array of forms: villanelles to ghazals, sonnets to somonkas, pantoums to haiku, even quizzes, questionnaires, and other nonliterary forms. Collaborators’ notes accompany many of the poems, giving a fascinating glimpse into the creative process.


Compare

Collaborative poetry — poems written by one or more people — grew out of word games played by French surrealists in the 1920s. It was taken up a decade later by Japan’s Vou Club and then by Charles Henri Ford, who created the chainpoem, composed by poets who mailed their lines all over the world. After WW II, the Beat writers’ collaborative experiments resulted in the famo Collaborative poetry — poems written by one or more people — grew out of word games played by French surrealists in the 1920s. It was taken up a decade later by Japan’s Vou Club and then by Charles Henri Ford, who created the chainpoem, composed by poets who mailed their lines all over the world. After WW II, the Beat writers’ collaborative experiments resulted in the famous Pull My Daisy. The concept was embraced in the 1970s by feminist poets as a way to find a collective female voice. Yet, for all its rich history, virtually no collections of collaborative poetry exist. This exhilarating anthology remedies the omission. Featured are poems by two, four, even as many as 18 people in a dizzying array of forms: villanelles to ghazals, sonnets to somonkas, pantoums to haiku, even quizzes, questionnaires, and other nonliterary forms. Collaborators’ notes accompany many of the poems, giving a fascinating glimpse into the creative process.

30 review for Saints of Hysteria: A Half-Century of Collaborative American Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    The first definitive collection of American collaborative poetry, ranging through the New York School, the Beats, Language poetry, to the present, with 140 poems by more than 200 authors culled from various magazines, out-of-print collections, and previously unpublished material, plus insightful process notes and author biographies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Bergman

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather Moss

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tony

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Lynn Brown

  7. 5 out of 5

    marlon

  8. 4 out of 5

    jo

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  10. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

  11. 4 out of 5

    Haines Eason

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn Cofell

  13. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donna Rae

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grey Pierce

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Naka Pierce

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Costello

  20. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Cornelius

  21. 4 out of 5

    smcdonaldpoet

  22. 4 out of 5

    Oliver

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna Chandler

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steve Teso

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Jonte

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bevharp64

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristi McGuire

  30. 5 out of 5

    Callista

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...