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Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism: Comics on Relationships, Life & Food

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#1 New Release in Art of Comics and Manga, Essays, and Women in Art - Cartoons About Feminism, Relationships, Self-Love and Adulthood by Planet PrudencePlanet Prudence book of comics: Popular online illustrator and Instagram sensation Prudence Planet Prudence Geerts presents her take on the struggles of adulting and finding your own voice. Funny Planet Prudence comics: Ba #1 New Release in Art of Comics and Manga, Essays, and Women in Art - Cartoons About Feminism, Relationships, Self-Love and Adulthood by Planet PrudencePlanet Prudence book of comics: Popular online illustrator and Instagram sensation Prudence Planet Prudence Geerts presents her take on the struggles of adulting and finding your own voice. Funny Planet Prudence comics: Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism is the debut collection from Prudence Geerts. Never before seen comic strips bundled with all the best Planet Prudence comics. This book will make you laugh at the awkward moments we all go through as we learn to be functioning adults in society and, hopefully, learn to make the world a better place. Graphic novel of humor, feminism, and relationships: We all think: "Am I the only one who acts like this? Am I the only one who goes through this moment in life?" Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism shows you that you're not. It laughs with you at the struggles you're going through as women fight for equal pay, respect and realistic role models. Filled with love, laughter and food Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism helps us realize that we're all not so different after all. Readers will find: Comic strips about the hilarious reality of work, relationships, dating, exercise, and beauty Inspirational illustrations about being confident and loving yourself If you liked We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham, or Herding Cats: A Sarah's Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen, you'll love Planet Prudence's Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism


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#1 New Release in Art of Comics and Manga, Essays, and Women in Art - Cartoons About Feminism, Relationships, Self-Love and Adulthood by Planet PrudencePlanet Prudence book of comics: Popular online illustrator and Instagram sensation Prudence Planet Prudence Geerts presents her take on the struggles of adulting and finding your own voice. Funny Planet Prudence comics: Ba #1 New Release in Art of Comics and Manga, Essays, and Women in Art - Cartoons About Feminism, Relationships, Self-Love and Adulthood by Planet PrudencePlanet Prudence book of comics: Popular online illustrator and Instagram sensation Prudence Planet Prudence Geerts presents her take on the struggles of adulting and finding your own voice. Funny Planet Prudence comics: Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism is the debut collection from Prudence Geerts. Never before seen comic strips bundled with all the best Planet Prudence comics. This book will make you laugh at the awkward moments we all go through as we learn to be functioning adults in society and, hopefully, learn to make the world a better place. Graphic novel of humor, feminism, and relationships: We all think: "Am I the only one who acts like this? Am I the only one who goes through this moment in life?" Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism shows you that you're not. It laughs with you at the struggles you're going through as women fight for equal pay, respect and realistic role models. Filled with love, laughter and food Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism helps us realize that we're all not so different after all. Readers will find: Comic strips about the hilarious reality of work, relationships, dating, exercise, and beauty Inspirational illustrations about being confident and loving yourself If you liked We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham, or Herding Cats: A Sarah's Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen, you'll love Planet Prudence's Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism

30 review for Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism: Comics on Relationships, Life & Food

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Honestly, this book seemed to be very little about "adulting" and very little about feminism (there were A LOT of comics about how the author is not like other girls). Did focus a lot on self worth, which was nice, it just wasn't for me. Honestly, this book seemed to be very little about "adulting" and very little about feminism (there were A LOT of comics about how the author is not like other girls). Did focus a lot on self worth, which was nice, it just wasn't for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    I’d like to crack a joke like, “I love this title because it’s basically my life” except that would be a lie, because I’m actually killing it at adulting this year … not that I want to be. Sometimes just have to. Still, Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism really does have an excellent title. Prudence Geerts has produced a cornucopia of tiny comics that illustrate, reflect upon, and poke fun at her own experiences, the way she sees the world, and the way the world might see her. As the title implie I’d like to crack a joke like, “I love this title because it’s basically my life” except that would be a lie, because I’m actually killing it at adulting this year … not that I want to be. Sometimes just have to. Still, Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism really does have an excellent title. Prudence Geerts has produced a cornucopia of tiny comics that illustrate, reflect upon, and poke fun at her own experiences, the way she sees the world, and the way the world might see her. As the title implies, she is, of course, discussing that millennial experience of growing up as the web came of age, of transitioning into adulthood in the age of social media, and, in her case, of being a woman all at the same time. There is a lot in here that I think would resonate with many readers, particularly people in that millennial bracket—but these experiences are by no means unique to that generation. Geerts’ cartoon style is interesting. Her comics usually feature a version of herself, with occasional guest characters (mostly her cat). They present a story in a minimum of words and an economy of visuals. The most predominant comic form is that of a side-by-side of two situations, either two of Geerts, or Geerts and someone else (often a hyper-idealized stereotypical woman), to depict the “expectation” versus the “reality” of a situation. These ones in particular are always clever, and even when they don’t apply to me, I can still sympathize with and understand the point Geerts makes with each one. Small content note/trigger warning for aromisic language: the section titled “Love Letters” begins with the phrase, “We all fall in love at least once in our lives…”, and the section is quite obviously about the ups and downs of romantic love. These kinds of blanket statements are dehumanizing for aromantic people; not everyone falls “in love” in the sense almost always meant by that phrase. One could simply change it to, “Many of us fall in love at least once in our lives…” and suddenly it isn’t a universal that excludes/erases aro people. There may be other problematic aspects to these comics, but most of them are about experiences quite different from my own, so it isn’t really my lane to comment on that. I have some thoughts about the “feminism” portion of the adulting/feminist content … suffice it to say, I just think that I’m in a somewhat different place right now in terms of the type of feminist reading I’m looking for. But I really don’t want to invalidate the work that Geerts has put into these comics, because they do embody feminist ideas and messages, and for some people they might land. Also, this is not the type of book I really enjoy reading. Novels are, of course, my primary jam. When I read comics, I tend to gravitate towards graphic novels. Collections of comics don’t do as well with me. If I had read some of Geerts’ comics individually somewhere, I would definitely be entertained, just as I am with xkcd, or The Oatmeal, etc., even though I’m not a huge fan of collection books in general. My friend Rebecca, who lent me this book, absolutely loved it. And I can see why she did! There are delightful things about it. She also pointed out to me that it wasn’t really meant to be read cover-from-cover, as I did, but rather dipped into and sipped at, and that’s a valid point. And this raises an interesting philosophical issue of literary criticism. When a reader doesn’t consume a book in the way it was intended to be consumed, is that on them? If I attend an arthouse drama and then complain there weren’t enough explosions, aren’t I being a dick for not tempering my expectations to the form? So can I really even properly rate a book if I think I haven’t experienced it in a way that does it justice? Aren’t I being a grumpy curmudgeon? I mean, you can see that I’ve obviously rated this book. But this is all just a long-winded disclaimer to remind you I’m just here to record my thoughts, and this review is probably not the one you want to be reading if you’re trying to decide whether or not to read this book. Unless you are me, in which case … you’ve already read this book, Ben. Get with the program. Anyway, I liked many of these comics individually. I like the idea behind the collection, even if the execution isn’t everything I wanted. I definitely think that a lot of people could pick up this collection and enjoy it—for me, personally, Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism has its moments but overall didn’t leave me wanting more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janna

    did you mean "bad at feminism" instead? truly, i don't feel like the author got what feminism actually means. cellulite and acne are not flaws, they're just part of your body, society makes you think these are flaws!! .. not very feminist for a feminist novel to say that they are flaws one can decide to love or not. bla. als why is the person that the author is always comparing themselves to always wearing makeup etc. hence kind of making fun of that, it feels very much like 'im not like other gir did you mean "bad at feminism" instead? truly, i don't feel like the author got what feminism actually means. cellulite and acne are not flaws, they're just part of your body, society makes you think these are flaws!! .. not very feminist for a feminist novel to say that they are flaws one can decide to love or not. bla. als why is the person that the author is always comparing themselves to always wearing makeup etc. hence kind of making fun of that, it feels very much like 'im not like other girl' (making yourself feel better by making fun of others) of course, discussions about periods are once again only focused on cis women. the author also says something like "we all fall in love at least once in our lives" (she means romantic love), sounds a bit arophobic to me or at least she isn't considering that some people might not fall in love.. and also she only uses he/him pronouns for romantic examples (when she's talking about us the readers in general), also feels queerphobic. tw: hp references

  4. 4 out of 5

    Oyinda

    Book 237 of 2021 2.5 ✨

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I’ve just read a few other books from people who are popular online for their comics and art, and because of that this one fell flat I think. I feel like at least 50% of it was just really boring, or full of generic examples of “other girls - then me”, or in some cases just a random drawing of something with no words, like one where it’s just her at a bar with two friends...standing there drinking? Ok? I don’t know, I was just really bored! And it might just be me, but I thought some of the sect I’ve just read a few other books from people who are popular online for their comics and art, and because of that this one fell flat I think. I feel like at least 50% of it was just really boring, or full of generic examples of “other girls - then me”, or in some cases just a random drawing of something with no words, like one where it’s just her at a bar with two friends...standing there drinking? Ok? I don’t know, I was just really bored! And it might just be me, but I thought some of the sections were so short as well. It was like “oh a bit about cats now? That’s fun- oh and it’s over.” I feel like I’m being really negative, because the art is cute and it’s great that it includes bits about CFS, chronic pain, body confidence and more, but the majority of it was just mild jokes or relatable stuff that everyone always does, and I’ve seen it done better in the other books I’ve just read. I’m pleased for the artist though, that she can do what she loves now because she obviously is really grateful and passionate about her art and being able to do it. And really my only problem is that this isn’t my cup of tea, I’m sure lots of people would enjoy it and obviously lots of people do.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mel ☀︎

    This should be called Okay-ish at adulting, bad at feminism. Though it's not really about either... For someone calling herself a feminist, the author spends a lot of time drawing comics pointing out how she's ~not like other girls~. Also uses the term spirit animal, erases aromantic people, doesn't use trigger warnings and throws around the word crazy. The fact that the chapter about period was called 'We are female, hear us roar' bothered me too. Not all women have periods and not everyone who This should be called Okay-ish at adulting, bad at feminism. Though it's not really about either... For someone calling herself a feminist, the author spends a lot of time drawing comics pointing out how she's ~not like other girls~. Also uses the term spirit animal, erases aromantic people, doesn't use trigger warnings and throws around the word crazy. The fact that the chapter about period was called 'We are female, hear us roar' bothered me too. Not all women have periods and not everyone who has periods is a woman. Reminder: feminism isn't feminism unless it's intersectional. That said, because I like ending on a positive note, the drawing style is cute and the focus on self-love is lovely. So there's that...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Machteld Bosmans

    10/10 would recommend it to everyone.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tania

    Literally filled with a lot of “ I’m not like other girls” stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily (em_isreading)

    What an utterly relatable series of comics! Everything from periods to chronic fatigue and social anxiety, I was nodding and laughing along. Highly recommend for a laugh and super fast read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Like other reviewers have pointed out, this book is not about adulting, and it is not about feminism. Maybe it's about depression, but the author wants to be chipper about it. She's a good enough cartoonist. I just found very little to enjoy here. Like other reviewers have pointed out, this book is not about adulting, and it is not about feminism. Maybe it's about depression, but the author wants to be chipper about it. She's a good enough cartoonist. I just found very little to enjoy here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I really wanted to like this. There is a lot to like: her honesty, relatable feelings/situations, and adorable artwork... but for some reason, I just kept feeling like... I SHOULD like this, but felt as though something was lacking or off, and I cannot explain why... I guess this just wasn't for me. I really wanted to like this. There is a lot to like: her honesty, relatable feelings/situations, and adorable artwork... but for some reason, I just kept feeling like... I SHOULD like this, but felt as though something was lacking or off, and I cannot explain why... I guess this just wasn't for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea B.

    I really liked this. So many were spot on. My favorite: "You don't have to prove your invisible illness to ignorant people." So true and so worth remembering. I will say I don't think the title really fits, though I do like it. 4.5 I really liked this. So many were spot on. My favorite: "You don't have to prove your invisible illness to ignorant people." So true and so worth remembering. I will say I don't think the title really fits, though I do like it. 4.5

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Scott

    Such a cute/funny and relatable comic! Feminism, funny moments, and life in general- you will be laughing your way through this! Highly recommend

  14. 5 out of 5

    E.

    Cute

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanie

    Cute

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amberfaye

    This book really made me smile while in a dark place. Beautiful.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jolie Adam

    Loved this gem.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Alternate title: OK at Adulting, Bad at Feminism.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    The comics were cute and the material covered was very relatable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin Williams

    Prudence gets right to the heart of why it’s so HARD to be a grown-ass woman right now. If you’ve ever looked at yourself and wondered if you’re doing it right then you can relate to the comics she’s drawn and shared in this book. Prudence takes you on a journey, a personal voyage, that not only lets you into her world but reminds you how connected our experiences are- regardless of where we’re from or what our age differences may be. You’ll see yourself drawn on these pages and it makes it all Prudence gets right to the heart of why it’s so HARD to be a grown-ass woman right now. If you’ve ever looked at yourself and wondered if you’re doing it right then you can relate to the comics she’s drawn and shared in this book. Prudence takes you on a journey, a personal voyage, that not only lets you into her world but reminds you how connected our experiences are- regardless of where we’re from or what our age differences may be. You’ll see yourself drawn on these pages and it makes it all seem a little more manageable. What is ‘it’? Heartbreak. Snacks. School. Shitty jobs. Periods. Chronic illness. Growing up and adulting in a world that is more tumultuous than we ever could have imagined.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    There are so many webcomics dealing with adulting experiences from the perspective of an awkward animal lover -- Sarah's Scribbles, Pigeon Gazette, Our Super Adventure, Adam Ellis etc-- that it takes originality and personality to stand out from the pack. This book is unfortunately a collection of familiar observations with a below average art style. And, for someone who claims to be good at feminism, there are an awful lot of comics negatively comparing herself to "other girls"-- portrayed as bu There are so many webcomics dealing with adulting experiences from the perspective of an awkward animal lover -- Sarah's Scribbles, Pigeon Gazette, Our Super Adventure, Adam Ellis etc-- that it takes originality and personality to stand out from the pack. This book is unfortunately a collection of familiar observations with a below average art style. And, for someone who claims to be good at feminism, there are an awful lot of comics negatively comparing herself to "other girls"-- portrayed as busty, sexed-up stereotypes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    mar

    I recently picked up getting back into reading again and for this to be the first source of material was pretty disappointing (And yes, I see this might be my fault on my part); I didn’t get past the first few pages. I could already see this wasn’t really about feminism or adulting but more about how not like other girls/ pick me the author is, whether or not that was her intention. I believe the best in people, so I hope the author has grown out of this mentality. Unless you’re just looking for I recently picked up getting back into reading again and for this to be the first source of material was pretty disappointing (And yes, I see this might be my fault on my part); I didn’t get past the first few pages. I could already see this wasn’t really about feminism or adulting but more about how not like other girls/ pick me the author is, whether or not that was her intention. I believe the best in people, so I hope the author has grown out of this mentality. Unless you’re just looking for a reallyyy easy read to pass time (such as waiting in line), I wouldn’t recommend at all.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    Honestly might have given it a higher rating (it's in the 2.5 range for me) if it had a different title since it's not about adulting or feminism. Some of the comics were really cute and relatable but there are also some that feel a little #notlikeothergirls - presumably as the artist gets older her perspective may change. Honestly might have given it a higher rating (it's in the 2.5 range for me) if it had a different title since it's not about adulting or feminism. Some of the comics were really cute and relatable but there are also some that feel a little #notlikeothergirls - presumably as the artist gets older her perspective may change.

  24. 4 out of 5

    TIFFANY

    3.5 stars Funny, relatable and a smooth quick read. I feel like this is the highest I can rate it since the book mainly consisted of comics about the author’s personality, career choice and struggle with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

  25. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    The animation in this novel is really great and funny. I also love how relatable it is. However, if you want a storyline this book doesn't have one, but it's a quick read, I think I read it in about 20 minutes. The animation in this novel is really great and funny. I also love how relatable it is. However, if you want a storyline this book doesn't have one, but it's a quick read, I think I read it in about 20 minutes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    I didn’t find many original concepts, it was all quite generic with minimal connections to the title. It was however light and quick and in some comics relatable, but it’s not one that will stand out to me over the years.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jasleen Kaur

    Partly good, partly okay.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emmah

    This wasn't bad, but it just wasn't for me. This wasn't bad, but it just wasn't for me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I appreciate the author and her quirky style, but I did not love this book. Maybe I'm too old and can't relate to the mid-twenties crowd anymore. I appreciate the author and her quirky style, but I did not love this book. Maybe I'm too old and can't relate to the mid-twenties crowd anymore.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alanah

    I immediately followed her Instagram account after reading the first few pages!

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