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Dove Song: Heavenly Mother in Mormon Poetry

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“She used to be a rumor. She used to be the one not to be named. We listened so hard at the edges of the conversation to hear anything—any detail, any dropped syllable. But thanks to the work of the visionary writers and editors who crafted DOVE SONG the Mormon concept of a Heavenly Mother now has so much presence! So many words! May we never lose her again.” —Joanna Brook “She used to be a rumor. She used to be the one not to be named. We listened so hard at the edges of the conversation to hear anything—any detail, any dropped syllable. But thanks to the work of the visionary writers and editors who crafted DOVE SONG the Mormon concept of a Heavenly Mother now has so much presence! So many words! May we never lose her again.” —Joanna Brooks DOVE SONG is an anthology of poetry and art centered on the Mormon concept of Heavenly Mother. It includes 138 poems from 80 poets and artists from the early church, to the late 20th Century to today. “DOVE SONG is unique in the canon of Mormon literature. And uniquely important. Not only is it a work of fine art, a carefully arranged series of poems that the poets have used their finest skill and training to create, but it is a work of history, a work of inspiration, and a sacred record of many individuals’ spiritual quest for additional revealed knowledge about Mother in Heaven.” —Susan Elizabeth Howe “This anthology is a shattering summary of poetic revelation, feminist theology, and Mormon history about our Mother God. Over seventy poets speak across time from 1844-2017, describing their visions and yearnings for the divine feminine, like soul mates through the veil. They begin in 1844 with W.W. Phelps, Eliza R. Snow, and Lula Green Richards in 1899, then disappear from the fin de siè·cle to the 1970s when Carol Lynn Pearson and Linda Sillitoe sing our Mother back. Like holy scribes, these poets persist, wondering and writing in the wilderness, seeking a promised land where God is home.” —Maxine Hanks


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“She used to be a rumor. She used to be the one not to be named. We listened so hard at the edges of the conversation to hear anything—any detail, any dropped syllable. But thanks to the work of the visionary writers and editors who crafted DOVE SONG the Mormon concept of a Heavenly Mother now has so much presence! So many words! May we never lose her again.” —Joanna Brook “She used to be a rumor. She used to be the one not to be named. We listened so hard at the edges of the conversation to hear anything—any detail, any dropped syllable. But thanks to the work of the visionary writers and editors who crafted DOVE SONG the Mormon concept of a Heavenly Mother now has so much presence! So many words! May we never lose her again.” —Joanna Brooks DOVE SONG is an anthology of poetry and art centered on the Mormon concept of Heavenly Mother. It includes 138 poems from 80 poets and artists from the early church, to the late 20th Century to today. “DOVE SONG is unique in the canon of Mormon literature. And uniquely important. Not only is it a work of fine art, a carefully arranged series of poems that the poets have used their finest skill and training to create, but it is a work of history, a work of inspiration, and a sacred record of many individuals’ spiritual quest for additional revealed knowledge about Mother in Heaven.” —Susan Elizabeth Howe “This anthology is a shattering summary of poetic revelation, feminist theology, and Mormon history about our Mother God. Over seventy poets speak across time from 1844-2017, describing their visions and yearnings for the divine feminine, like soul mates through the veil. They begin in 1844 with W.W. Phelps, Eliza R. Snow, and Lula Green Richards in 1899, then disappear from the fin de siè·cle to the 1970s when Carol Lynn Pearson and Linda Sillitoe sing our Mother back. Like holy scribes, these poets persist, wondering and writing in the wilderness, seeking a promised land where God is home.” —Maxine Hanks

30 review for Dove Song: Heavenly Mother in Mormon Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Segullah

    Under the full moon, I opened the package of bees. For me, it was a holy act. There is a little plastic sleeve that pulls back and underneath is the queen bee in a tiny wooden casket with a metal grid on one side. She sits in isolation, while thousands of bees rest in a plastic mesh box beneath her, poking out their tongues, humming out their ache, and straining their tiny legs to escape. I pulled out the queen bee and put her in the waiting empty hive. “Once you’ve placed the queen, just open t Under the full moon, I opened the package of bees. For me, it was a holy act. There is a little plastic sleeve that pulls back and underneath is the queen bee in a tiny wooden casket with a metal grid on one side. She sits in isolation, while thousands of bees rest in a plastic mesh box beneath her, poking out their tongues, humming out their ache, and straining their tiny legs to escape. I pulled out the queen bee and put her in the waiting empty hive. “Once you’ve placed the queen, just open the bottom of the hive and the top of the plastic box. Rest the hive on top. Let it sit through the night. By the morning, the bees will have captured her scent and will rise up out of the box and into the hive,” were my instructions. The bees will eat through the fondant cork that holds the queen bee inside her little box. They will free her and when they do (to the adulation and adoration of thousands of bees) she will begin her work. I woke up at 5:30 am the next day and couldn’t sleep anymore. I had to know about the bees. I put on my bee suit and went out just as the sky was beginning to become light, but it was still cold. Many of the bees had found their way into the hive and to the queen, but there were still hundreds in the box. Some were out, but sitting on the stump or outside of the hive, trying to find their way in. All throughout the day, I watched them. They seemed dazed and confused. The heady aroma of spring lilacs and burgeoning apple tree blossoms nearby was calling. They flew in circles around the hive, smelling the queen and searching for the entrance, but not finding their way in. Hours passed. I went to check on them again once the moon had risen and the night air spread its blanket over my backyard. Everything was silent at the hive. I panicked. I shined my flashlight through the little window at the bottom of the hive and it was empty! No bees! Where could they have gone? Carefully, I opened the top to peek into the top tier of the hive. It was thrumming and full. They had all found their mother, tight and clumped around her smell. If I could somehow capture the flight patterns, the leg scratches, and the dances the bees make, I believe they would recreate the poetry and art in Dove Song: Heavenly Mother in Mormon Poetry... to read the rest of this lyrical review, please visit us at https://segullah.org/book-review/book...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    An interesting and stirring compilation of poetry featuring Heavenly Mother. A vastly important work for any library seeking to more fully understand the tradition of Heavenly Mother in LDS theology.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Exponent II

    There has been no greater longing in my life as a member of the LDS Church than to feel true, divine womanhood. Hours upon hours of hearing from leaders and members alike that I have divine womanhood has not quenched that thirst at all because it has felt hollow and without meaning in its context. If the men are to be like God, about whom volumes are written, and women are to be something else entirely, then we must look to an invisible Goddess that we can’t see, know virtually nothing about, an There has been no greater longing in my life as a member of the LDS Church than to feel true, divine womanhood. Hours upon hours of hearing from leaders and members alike that I have divine womanhood has not quenched that thirst at all because it has felt hollow and without meaning in its context. If the men are to be like God, about whom volumes are written, and women are to be something else entirely, then we must look to an invisible Goddess that we can’t see, know virtually nothing about, and to whom we are forbidden to pray (certainly not openly, where others can hear us). With so little explicitly said about Her, at least in terms of sheer volume relative to Her counterpart, we are forced to gather bits and pieces, opaque clues and flutters of inspiration, and quilt them together silently. She is still a very abstract concept, so it follows that so much of our hearts’ crying out for Her is expressed through the arts. That is usually how people try to make the abstract concrete and discernible.... to read the rest of this review, please visit the Exponent webpage @https://www.the-exponent.com/christma...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dallas

    More info needed First of all let me say I didn’t read every poem here. I did “heavily sample” them. I enjoyed Carol Lynn Pearson’s poetry the best of the bunch. It seems that lots of people have questions about Heavenly Mother, which they should. A couple seem tinged with anger, but most just want to know more. More about Her and Her role. All-n-all we need to let our curiosity and need to know tend more toward patience than with with irritation. That of course is true with everything that God ho More info needed First of all let me say I didn’t read every poem here. I did “heavily sample” them. I enjoyed Carol Lynn Pearson’s poetry the best of the bunch. It seems that lots of people have questions about Heavenly Mother, which they should. A couple seem tinged with anger, but most just want to know more. More about Her and Her role. All-n-all we need to let our curiosity and need to know tend more toward patience than with with irritation. That of course is true with everything that God holds in reserve for His purposes. We need to try to view this current lack of information through spiritual acceptance and hopefully spiritual understanding, eventually, rather than our current culture of “I want what I want now”. It appears that God’s culture and ours are not yet in alignment. I do think real effort to understand and desire and effort to seek that understanding are what is represented here. Thanks!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaylee

    Beautiful and thought provoking. I loved that so many of the poems see Heavenly Mother in nature. In The Power of Myth I remember reading about the idea that cultures that worship a male god tend to see god as being separated from humans, and cultures that worship a female god usually see god as part of the earth. I don't see why the two have to be mutually exclusive. The friend who gave me this book told me she wished my piece "Projects" had been published early enough to be included. I fly high Beautiful and thought provoking. I loved that so many of the poems see Heavenly Mother in nature. In The Power of Myth I remember reading about the idea that cultures that worship a male god tend to see god as being separated from humans, and cultures that worship a female god usually see god as part of the earth. I don't see why the two have to be mutually exclusive. The friend who gave me this book told me she wished my piece "Projects" had been published early enough to be included. I fly high as a kite every time I think of that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Disclaimer: Two poems I wrote are in this book. This is the definitive collection of poetry about Heavenly Mother, ranging from the early days of the LDS Church to poems written in 2017. The chronological order emphasizes a dearth of this type of poetry between the end of the nineteenth century and about 1970, which is an interesting thing. The endnotes and other back matter are well worth reading. Some poems spoke to me more than others, but that's the nature of poetry. Disclaimer: Two poems I wrote are in this book. This is the definitive collection of poetry about Heavenly Mother, ranging from the early days of the LDS Church to poems written in 2017. The chronological order emphasizes a dearth of this type of poetry between the end of the nineteenth century and about 1970, which is an interesting thing. The endnotes and other back matter are well worth reading. Some poems spoke to me more than others, but that's the nature of poetry.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Genet

    I cannot put my love for this book into words. The poetry is moving and compelling. I have marked my favorites and return them often. Poetry seems like the perfect way to talk about Heavenly Mother and to come to know Her better.

  8. 5 out of 5

    GreenJellybean

    A wide collection of treasures. I believe this book reflects all experiences of Mother and leaves the reader feeling loved and warm.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Incredible collection of treasures

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Voelker

  11. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Jo

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Pinborough

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luisa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Analeis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emily Wagner

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mattie Mortensen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert Moody

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin Guinevere

  20. 4 out of 5

    Arianna

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Haley

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  24. 4 out of 5

    Terresa

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lina

  27. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alynne Hendricks

  29. 4 out of 5

    Debra McCracken

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lambooks

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