Hot Best Seller

Nighing REALITY: Quantum Fusion after 25 years of Confusion

Availability: Ready to download

After ‘Records of the Future’ and ‘Aiming at REALITY’, 'Nighing REALITY' is a step forward towards clutching the elusive notion of Reality. The InSight mission to Mars (book cover) is all about exploring the external world, with measurement being supreme: any instrument suspect of altering what it measures will be blamed on the incompetence of its designer -- not on Realit After ‘Records of the Future’ and ‘Aiming at REALITY’, 'Nighing REALITY' is a step forward towards clutching the elusive notion of Reality. The InSight mission to Mars (book cover) is all about exploring the external world, with measurement being supreme: any instrument suspect of altering what it measures will be blamed on the incompetence of its designer -- not on Reality. Whether we make close contact with Reality or not will depend upon how cogently we process the data that the InSight explorer will transmit to us. With a philosophical introduction, followed by a conceptual presentation of Classical Physics, the evolution towards the new quantum paradigm is narrated through the discussion of spontaneous radioactivity, Ray and Wave Optics, Hamilton’s mechanics, Einstein’s light quanta, Bohr’s atom, Quantum Entropy, and de Broglie’s Wave Mechanics. The book ends with a conceptual presentation of how, motivated by persistent disagreement between theory and experiment, the first formulation of modern Quantum Physics -Matrix Mechanics- was born. In the process, the reader will understand that: 1. The relational behavior of a physical object vis à vis its environment does not diminish a bit its reality -- let alone does it imply that we are creating the Reality we observe; 2. The object’s milieu is an essential part of the object’s quantum state; 3. The exponential function with both real and imaginary arguments holds a privileged status in Nature’s modus operandi; 4. Discreteness in physical attributes is very common in our level of common experience, e.g. the discrete frequencies of the standing waves established in a guitar string; 5. The classical wavelike interpretation of light diffraction utterly fails as light intensity is gradually reduced. Light is neither a wave nor a stream of Newton’s particles; 6. Photons are not Newton’s corpuscles because they do not have a rest mass and, due to energy conservation, their number is not conserved; 7. The classical relation between the motion of an electrically charged object and the electromagnetic radiation it creates completely fails in the micro-world; 8. Bosons (e.g. photons) are indistinguishable gregarious quantum objects, and Fermions (e.g. electrons) are indistinguishable separatist quantum objects; 9. With the new quantum statistics (Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac), plus Planck’s quantization of Boltzmann’s cell, the concept of Statistical Entropy finally becomes absolute and fully consistent with the Third Law of Thermodynamics; 10. De Broglie extended Einstein’s theory of the photon to massive particles, proving that Bohr’s mysterious quantization of the atom’s energy levels was equivalent to identifying the discrete stable states of a continuous system; 11. Heisenberg wrote down the mechanical laws not as equations for the trajectory of the electron orbiting the nucleus but as equations for their Fourier expansions. The Hamiltonian Function became a matrix. The famous matrix commutation relation came about as the generalization of Bohr’s quantizing condition; 12. The ‘Principle of Uncertainty’ is anticipated to have nothing to do with measurement disturbances or measurement errors. As the author likes to say: the fact that the reader may not have a scientific education does not mean that s/he does not have the intelligence to understand profound concepts -- as long as they are presented with semantic and epistemological clarity. After all, Einstein said that Science is simply the refinement of our intuition and everyday experiences.


Compare

After ‘Records of the Future’ and ‘Aiming at REALITY’, 'Nighing REALITY' is a step forward towards clutching the elusive notion of Reality. The InSight mission to Mars (book cover) is all about exploring the external world, with measurement being supreme: any instrument suspect of altering what it measures will be blamed on the incompetence of its designer -- not on Realit After ‘Records of the Future’ and ‘Aiming at REALITY’, 'Nighing REALITY' is a step forward towards clutching the elusive notion of Reality. The InSight mission to Mars (book cover) is all about exploring the external world, with measurement being supreme: any instrument suspect of altering what it measures will be blamed on the incompetence of its designer -- not on Reality. Whether we make close contact with Reality or not will depend upon how cogently we process the data that the InSight explorer will transmit to us. With a philosophical introduction, followed by a conceptual presentation of Classical Physics, the evolution towards the new quantum paradigm is narrated through the discussion of spontaneous radioactivity, Ray and Wave Optics, Hamilton’s mechanics, Einstein’s light quanta, Bohr’s atom, Quantum Entropy, and de Broglie’s Wave Mechanics. The book ends with a conceptual presentation of how, motivated by persistent disagreement between theory and experiment, the first formulation of modern Quantum Physics -Matrix Mechanics- was born. In the process, the reader will understand that: 1. The relational behavior of a physical object vis à vis its environment does not diminish a bit its reality -- let alone does it imply that we are creating the Reality we observe; 2. The object’s milieu is an essential part of the object’s quantum state; 3. The exponential function with both real and imaginary arguments holds a privileged status in Nature’s modus operandi; 4. Discreteness in physical attributes is very common in our level of common experience, e.g. the discrete frequencies of the standing waves established in a guitar string; 5. The classical wavelike interpretation of light diffraction utterly fails as light intensity is gradually reduced. Light is neither a wave nor a stream of Newton’s particles; 6. Photons are not Newton’s corpuscles because they do not have a rest mass and, due to energy conservation, their number is not conserved; 7. The classical relation between the motion of an electrically charged object and the electromagnetic radiation it creates completely fails in the micro-world; 8. Bosons (e.g. photons) are indistinguishable gregarious quantum objects, and Fermions (e.g. electrons) are indistinguishable separatist quantum objects; 9. With the new quantum statistics (Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac), plus Planck’s quantization of Boltzmann’s cell, the concept of Statistical Entropy finally becomes absolute and fully consistent with the Third Law of Thermodynamics; 10. De Broglie extended Einstein’s theory of the photon to massive particles, proving that Bohr’s mysterious quantization of the atom’s energy levels was equivalent to identifying the discrete stable states of a continuous system; 11. Heisenberg wrote down the mechanical laws not as equations for the trajectory of the electron orbiting the nucleus but as equations for their Fourier expansions. The Hamiltonian Function became a matrix. The famous matrix commutation relation came about as the generalization of Bohr’s quantizing condition; 12. The ‘Principle of Uncertainty’ is anticipated to have nothing to do with measurement disturbances or measurement errors. As the author likes to say: the fact that the reader may not have a scientific education does not mean that s/he does not have the intelligence to understand profound concepts -- as long as they are presented with semantic and epistemological clarity. After all, Einstein said that Science is simply the refinement of our intuition and everyday experiences.

17 review for Nighing REALITY: Quantum Fusion after 25 years of Confusion

  1. 4 out of 5

    WarpDrive

    Another excellent book by this gifted author, who manages to deliver a very entertaining, accessible yet highly informative book, presented with an ambitious scope and succinctly conveyed with concise clarity and conceptual precision. This book differs a little bit from previous publications by the same author, as some of the arguments and topics developed here might well be classified as belonging to a level of sophistication generally higher than his previous writings. Thus, while this book ca Another excellent book by this gifted author, who manages to deliver a very entertaining, accessible yet highly informative book, presented with an ambitious scope and succinctly conveyed with concise clarity and conceptual precision. This book differs a little bit from previous publications by the same author, as some of the arguments and topics developed here might well be classified as belonging to a level of sophistication generally higher than his previous writings. Thus, while this book can still be regarded as an accessible yet enlightening exploration of very interesting topics in the realm of popular science, I would recommend it to readers who do not fear some mathematical formalism and who are ready to invest the due time and focus on the fascinating topics presented here by the author. And I can only fully empathize with the author's efforts in his attempt to present his topics in a relatively rigorous manner for a book of serious popular science, which necessarily require a modicum of mathematical formalism: as Feynman said: “To those who do not know mathematics it is difficult to get across a real feeling as to the beauty, the deepest beauty, of nature ... If you want to learn about nature, to appreciate nature, it is necessary to understand the language that she speaks in.” It must also be said though that the same conceptual clarity, enthusiasm and refreshing blend of inter-related technical, scientific, philosophical themes (the author is not scared to highlight and confront the philosophical enigma that arise from contemporary science), and historical notes, characterise this book as much as all the author's previous publications, so the patient reader will be amply rewarded for his/her efforts. The conceptual and mathematical progression in the book is reasonably gentle, so the reader with even just basic prior exposure to the themes presented in the book will find the reading experience a very pleasurable one, an easy and engrossing read. I think that a decent prior exposure to undergraduate-level basic mathematical concepts (such as basics of multivariate calculus) is more than enough to ensure a fluent and trouble-free reading experience, and the author is always at pains to explain in detail the physical meaning of each equation as soon as it is introduced in the text. I loved reading this book as well as the other books by this author, but I must disclaim that I may well favorably disposed towards the authors views in my judgment, as I strongly share many of his views, in particular with regards to: - his emphasizing of the relational character of the object’s physical properties (which, as the author correctly claims, does not deny or diminish a bit its reality, let alone imply that it is the observer that creates the observed reality); this without denying, of course, the necessarily interpretative aspects of the process of scientific progress - his scientific realism and his commitment to the epistemological primacy of science - his skepticism towards unwarranted forms of mysticism, and his rejection of cheap teleological interpretation of the physical laws that characterise reality - his wariness when it comes to the huge amount of misleading oversimplifications, conceptual confusion, and pseudo philosophical mumbo-jumbo that sadly infect a portion of current popular science The themes treated in the first half of the books are pretty traditional (the exponential decay model, conservative fields, extremum principles for light refraction and reflection, the principle of least action, the harmonic oscillator, the wave equation and Schrodinger equation, a touch of Fourier analysis, the double-slit experiment, the Hamiltonian approach to dynamics, Bohr's model of the atom and its shortcomings etc.) but this will not necessarily induce any boredom in the more knowledgeable/experienced reader, as they are often approached by the author with an an original, personal slant, and the exposition progresses in a very integrated, organic, fluent and natural way from one theme to the next. I would not want to give the impression that it is just run-of-the-mill, common and traditional topics that are treated in this book. For example, starting from Chapter 4, interesting concepts and results from statistical mechanics (such as entropy and the famous Maxwell–Boltzmann statistics - topics that are not always introduced in traditional popular science books), are introduced by the author. Important results such as the Fermi-Dirac and the Bose-Einstein Statistics are treated with great clarity, and it is refreshing to see that the author does not introduce these important topics out of thin air, and that he also highlights their continuity with the classical Maxwell-Boltzmann Statistics under appropriate limiting conditions. In chapter 5, the De Broglie approach is extensively discussed, and the important concept of covariance is informally introduced. Chapter 6 might possibly presents a bit of a challenge to the less mathematically inclined, at least at first glance. But it is well-worth reading, as it is brilliantly executed and highly informative. Typical topics that are part of the core of Quantum Mechanics (such as the Quantum Matrix Mechanics and the Quantum Linear Harmonic Oscillator) are presented by the author. Here the book assume more of a semi-popular character, requiring focus and attention on part of the reader who did not have previous exposure to such items. Overall, this book has been a very pleasing reading experience, an informative and conceptually precise treatment of many topics of high interest, and deserving praise for the continuous attempt to reconcile rigour with accessibility. 4.5 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    BetseaK

    If you'd like to delve deeper into the mysteries of the Quantum World, yet you lack the formal education to go beyond the metaphoric explanations, Nighing Reality is a wonderful primer. It is presented for the lay persons brave enough to expose their brains to the challenge of discovering what intriguing insights lie hidden in the math formulae and symbols. If you're eager to stretch your synapses and clear the fog from many a concept you thought you knew all about, pick this book to equip yours If you'd like to delve deeper into the mysteries of the Quantum World, yet you lack the formal education to go beyond the metaphoric explanations, Nighing Reality is a wonderful primer. It is presented for the lay persons brave enough to expose their brains to the challenge of discovering what intriguing insights lie hidden in the math formulae and symbols. If you're eager to stretch your synapses and clear the fog from many a concept you thought you knew all about, pick this book to equip yourself to reach deeper and deeper in your further exploration of the intricacies of our Microworld Reality.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nico Alba

  4. 4 out of 5

    sophia yusuf

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  6. 5 out of 5

    Blair

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  8. 5 out of 5

    Max

  9. 5 out of 5

    Louis

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

  11. 4 out of 5

    Grandyura

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nick Benaglio

  13. 4 out of 5

    Darpan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Júnior

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Wojtyra

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nzcgzmt מזבעזצא

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dbarac

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...