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Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 9: Deface the Face

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Once upon a time, Harvey Dent was the best man in Gotham City. Now he's two of the worst as the bifurcated criminal called Two-Face. Harvey's devilish duality is a painful reminder of the force for good he once was as Gotham's district attorney...and as the close friend and ally of Batman and Jim Gordon. But when a series of double-themed crimes breaks out and a sinister te Once upon a time, Harvey Dent was the best man in Gotham City. Now he's two of the worst as the bifurcated criminal called Two-Face. Harvey's devilish duality is a painful reminder of the force for good he once was as Gotham's district attorney...and as the close friend and ally of Batman and Jim Gordon. But when a series of double-themed crimes breaks out and a sinister terrorist organization slithers back into town, the Dark Knight must turn to Two-Face to unravel the mystery and stop the invasion. For Harvey, it's a chance to crack the one case he could never solve...if he can keep his dark side under control. If he wins, his unlikely partnership with Batman could pay off, and mark a turning point in his tragic life. But when the balance between good and evil can be decided with the flip of a coin, all bets are off. Some scars run deep. And the conspiracy Batman, Gordon and Two-Face are about to uncover runs even deeper... Comics writer James Robinson is joined by artists Stephen Segovia and Carmine Di Giandomenico for Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 9: Deface the Face--a thrilling adventure that takes the Dark Knight deep inside the mind of one of his most fascinating foes. Collects issues #988-993!


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Once upon a time, Harvey Dent was the best man in Gotham City. Now he's two of the worst as the bifurcated criminal called Two-Face. Harvey's devilish duality is a painful reminder of the force for good he once was as Gotham's district attorney...and as the close friend and ally of Batman and Jim Gordon. But when a series of double-themed crimes breaks out and a sinister te Once upon a time, Harvey Dent was the best man in Gotham City. Now he's two of the worst as the bifurcated criminal called Two-Face. Harvey's devilish duality is a painful reminder of the force for good he once was as Gotham's district attorney...and as the close friend and ally of Batman and Jim Gordon. But when a series of double-themed crimes breaks out and a sinister terrorist organization slithers back into town, the Dark Knight must turn to Two-Face to unravel the mystery and stop the invasion. For Harvey, it's a chance to crack the one case he could never solve...if he can keep his dark side under control. If he wins, his unlikely partnership with Batman could pay off, and mark a turning point in his tragic life. But when the balance between good and evil can be decided with the flip of a coin, all bets are off. Some scars run deep. And the conspiracy Batman, Gordon and Two-Face are about to uncover runs even deeper... Comics writer James Robinson is joined by artists Stephen Segovia and Carmine Di Giandomenico for Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 9: Deface the Face--a thrilling adventure that takes the Dark Knight deep inside the mind of one of his most fascinating foes. Collects issues #988-993!

30 review for Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 9: Deface the Face

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Yup, it’s another one of those “art’s good, writing stinks” (ie. 90% of most comics) reviews! Detective Comics, Volume 9: Deface the Face looks exactly how I want a Batman comic to look. In a word: awesome. Dramatic, dark, exciting, polished - I totally enjoyed this book from a visual standpoint and cowls off to Stephen Segovia and Carmine Di Giandomenico for that. James Robinson though - pee-yew! What a rubbish story. Some crap about Kobra contaminating the Gotham water supply to turn everyone Yup, it’s another one of those “art’s good, writing stinks” (ie. 90% of most comics) reviews! Detective Comics, Volume 9: Deface the Face looks exactly how I want a Batman comic to look. In a word: awesome. Dramatic, dark, exciting, polished - I totally enjoyed this book from a visual standpoint and cowls off to Stephen Segovia and Carmine Di Giandomenico for that. James Robinson though - pee-yew! What a rubbish story. Some crap about Kobra contaminating the Gotham water supply to turn everyone into followers of Kobra. Who the fuck are Kobra?! Maybe they’ve been introduced in earlier books - I haven’t kept up with the series as James Tynion IV is a terrible writer I can’t stand. I guess the League of Shadows was busy? Two-Face “shockingly” helps out Batman even though blah blah predictable crap and status quo is reinstated by the end. A couple Fire Flies are thrown in the mix too. It’s nice to look at but the convoluted and forgettable story makes Deface the Face a total waste of time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A psuedo-sequel to Robinson's Face the Face. Two-Face teams up with Batman to stop Kobra. The explanation for why Two-Face is helping Batman is very contrived. This feels like nothing more than a holdover before Peter Tomasi takes over the book and builds to issue #1,000. I liked Stephen Segovia and Carmine di Giandomencio's art on the arc although they don't mess very well. The coloring was outstanding. A psuedo-sequel to Robinson's Face the Face. Two-Face teams up with Batman to stop Kobra. The explanation for why Two-Face is helping Batman is very contrived. This feels like nothing more than a holdover before Peter Tomasi takes over the book and builds to issue #1,000. I liked Stephen Segovia and Carmine di Giandomencio's art on the arc although they don't mess very well. The coloring was outstanding.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    The dialog is sooo bad, so so so bad. World: The art is okay for the most part, until Di Giandomencio, then the art gets fugly as all hell. I am not a fan of his scratchy and blurry art and the colors that he chooses and to see him do the Flash and now Batman it makes my eyeballs want to bleed. The world building here is okay, it's a continuation of Batman 50 but where King continues to kill and moves the story forward in that area here the world looks backwards and pulls pieces of the DCU for Ba The dialog is sooo bad, so so so bad. World: The art is okay for the most part, until Di Giandomencio, then the art gets fugly as all hell. I am not a fan of his scratchy and blurry art and the colors that he chooses and to see him do the Flash and now Batman it makes my eyeballs want to bleed. The world building here is okay, it's a continuation of Batman 50 but where King continues to kill and moves the story forward in that area here the world looks backwards and pulls pieces of the DCU for Batman and tells the same story on a familiar stage. Story: Wow I cannot express how terribly bad the dialog for this arc is, you have to read it to believe it. It reads like a 5 year old trying to be Batman and falling flat on his face. The lines and banter are painful to read they are so over the top and not in a good 1966 way, this is just terrible writing. The story is aight, it's nothing really special and the idea of Batman teaming up with Two Face has been done before because of the dual personality, it's nothing new here and nothing new is presented to the table. The idea of the two gunshots and who shot first and the pop psychology behind the idea is contrived. Robinson doesn't know what to do with Batman, is he the world's greatest detective, cause he calls himself that in the books, and is he inept cause is pretty much is, the characters are wildly inconsistent but more of that below. The story drags on, it really drags on, normally I like stories that slow burn and give readers a wonderful world and story to enjoy and here, I just wanted it to end cause it was so familiar and the same stuff again and again. I recently read Batgirl Vanishing Point and the same problems are here, why are we retreading the same story again can a writer be not more creative with Two Face? Nope. In the end the story doesn't matter and the stakes doesn't matter and the last issue is laughable in it's conceit. I've already forgotten about this arc and most readers should just skip it, you won't miss much. Characters: Every character in this book is written poorly and out of character because of the horrid dialog, it's really stunted, janky, and over the top. The dialog makes my eyes want to bleed (along with the art) and reading it makes me laugh out loud in the not good way, this writing is bad. With that the characters don't feel like themselves but feels like a child playing with action figures pretending to be these characters and therefore this entire story is not really real. The same old note with Two Face is old, it's been done so many times I am so bored of lazy writers not trying. Scott Snyder did the same thing in All Star Batman and even there at least the writing was better. Not a good arc, not a memorable arc, not an arc you need to read...unless you want to experience the painful dialog. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This was... incredibly boring for me. This had all the elements of the Batman books I don't like to read: a bunch of cool poses, one or two one liners and no real appearances from the Batfamily. The family and the team are what made the first few volumes so enjoyable. Without them, I'm reminded of how boring I find Batsy as a character on his own. So, this wasn't that enjoyable for me - which is fine. I'm sure other people found something to love in this book. This was... incredibly boring for me. This had all the elements of the Batman books I don't like to read: a bunch of cool poses, one or two one liners and no real appearances from the Batfamily. The family and the team are what made the first few volumes so enjoyable. Without them, I'm reminded of how boring I find Batsy as a character on his own. So, this wasn't that enjoyable for me - which is fine. I'm sure other people found something to love in this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    I like James Robinson but this was kinda painful. The dialogue is actually laughable in parts. Art is inconsistent but has really strong moments.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    James Robinson returns to Two-Face, one of his favourite characters, in a pseudo-sequel to Face The Face that drags Batman and Commissioner Gordon along for the ride as the character attempts to unravel a conspiracy featuring not one but two Fireflies, and Cobra! This arc's kind of filler. After James Tynion IV's run ended and Bryan Hill's Outsiders backdoor pilot arc, Robinson steps in to fill these issues before Pete Tomasi takes over with the next volume. There's definitely a sense that this s James Robinson returns to Two-Face, one of his favourite characters, in a pseudo-sequel to Face The Face that drags Batman and Commissioner Gordon along for the ride as the character attempts to unravel a conspiracy featuring not one but two Fireflies, and Cobra! This arc's kind of filler. After James Tynion IV's run ended and Bryan Hill's Outsiders backdoor pilot arc, Robinson steps in to fill these issues before Pete Tomasi takes over with the next volume. There's definitely a sense that this story isn't essential, and it doesn't really touch on much going on around it aside from Batman feeling a little off as a result of Selina Kyle's decision in Batman #50. The story itself is fine. It's not as crazy as it could be, and it winds around a little too much in the middle, but it comes to a good conclusion and uses everything Robinson sets up along the way to feed into the eventual ending. It's not even really a character study of Two-Face like Face The Face was, just kind of an excuse for Robinson to use him again. The art is divided between Stephen Segovia and Carmine Di Giandomenico - Segovia's art is probably more weighty, but Di Giandomenico's unique visuals are always going to be my favourite. Deface The Face is the definition of a three star story. It's okay, but in the grand scheme of things, it's not going to stand out much.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If there’s one person who truly embraced both sides of the law, it’s the once-district-attorney Harvey Dent who now embraces his different personalities as he deals in criminality and insanity. His two-sided features make him a force to not reckon with as his friendship with Bruce Wayne and James Gordon gives him a little bit of a cushion on which to land on in times of trouble. With everyone praying that his best side could one day take over, T You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If there’s one person who truly embraced both sides of the law, it’s the once-district-attorney Harvey Dent who now embraces his different personalities as he deals in criminality and insanity. His two-sided features make him a force to not reckon with as his friendship with Bruce Wayne and James Gordon gives him a little bit of a cushion on which to land on in times of trouble. With everyone praying that his best side could one day take over, Two-Face is a villain that you just can’t see coming unless you put yourself in his shoes. Channeling his success with Batman: Face the Face in 2006, writer James Robinson returns to helm a new story-arc within the Detective Comics series with the return of Two-Face and his maleficent plans in Gotham. What is Batman: Detective Comics: Deface the Face about? Collecting issues #988-993, the story takes place after Tom King’s infamous issue #50 of his Batman series with the brutal aftermath regarding his wedding with Catwoman—an unprecedented reference to the ongoing series that has never been done before. Gotham now sees the breakout of a series of double-themed crimes elaborated by a sinister terrorist organization looking to rupture the unusual peace and quiet in this city of doom and gloom. With obvious hints towards the only supervillain who loves duality more than himself, Batman hunts down Harvey Dent for answers only to find out that to end this crisis, they will need to cooperate. This story-arc turned out to be a disaster. The first disappointment comes from the fact that the previous volume served as a trampoline to launch a new series written by Brian Hill called Batman and the Outsiders, leaving the newly-introduced team in Batman: Detective Comics: On the Outside irrelevant for James Robinson’s story. With almost no sense of continuity, this story arc thus takes on the burden of being a stand-alone tale and you can bet that my expectations for those kinds of stories are pretty high. The second disappointment presents itself when you understand that Deface the Face focuses on Batman rather than the rest of the Bat Family, leading you to wonder what exactly is the Detective Comics series now looking to do differently compared to the ongoing Batman series. With no more identity, this story was bound to be put under the microscope. The third disappointment rises from the incredibly dull and unmemorable story written around Two-Face without presenting anything fresh or extensive about any of the characters included in this mystery. Although I love the duality in Harvey Dent’s character, as his story shifts him from good to evil following a tragedy, writer James Robinson beautifully fails to deliver an authentic arc with his story, his characters and his ending utterly incomprehensible. In this situation, he horribly depicts his characters, making no effort in getting the traits and characteristics of his characters right, giving them unrealistic dialogues that make no sense. Take, for example, Batman openly self-proclaiming himself as the world’s greatest detective to Commissioner James Gordon. I think it’s safe to say that being cocky, eccentric, and wordy is not something you’d associate to the Dark Knight. The story also unfolds ambiguously, with motives that are either unknown or impossible to identify with villains that were never heard of before. To help James Robinson visually translate his ideas, two artists are put to work, each sharing half of the story arc. First comes artist Stephen Segovia who offers some really stunning artwork with some stellar panels that reflect the gothic atmosphere often associated with Gotham, with meticulous attention to detail. Then comes artist Carmine Di Giandomenico who shifts the artwork in another direction that was far from being the worse style imaginable but still wasn’t appealing to my eyes. Ivan Plascencia consistent work with colours does help a lot in giving the overall volume a somber yet vibrant tone but the result is far too unrewarding, and the artwork could never redeem for the horrible writing and plotting. Batman: Detective Comics: Deface the Face is a terrible story arc that barely stays glued together as it invites Batman to join forces with Two-Face to uncover a confusing conspiracy. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    While clearly a fill-in arc that doesn’t relate to any of the major stories going on in Batman’s world, this is a solid Two-Face story. The art styles might be a bit jarring, but it’s worth the read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Let me start by saying its refreshing to have a good writer on a mainline Batman comic! I won't lie, I haven't been a fan of Tom King's Batman or Tynion's Detective; I haven't read the previous Byran Hill volume but I'm sure its better than anything Tynion ever wrote! Now we have James Robinson on the title and he does a decent job! So the story has Batman investigating a murder when he soon finds out Two-Face and the Fireflies are involved. In terms of what I liked, I enjoyed that this was a st Let me start by saying its refreshing to have a good writer on a mainline Batman comic! I won't lie, I haven't been a fan of Tom King's Batman or Tynion's Detective; I haven't read the previous Byran Hill volume but I'm sure its better than anything Tynion ever wrote! Now we have James Robinson on the title and he does a decent job! So the story has Batman investigating a murder when he soon finds out Two-Face and the Fireflies are involved. In terms of what I liked, I enjoyed that this was a story about Batman actually being a detective; then the whole team batman debacle. But if your a fan of Two-Face you will enjoy this, as the story very much is about him and the duality between him and Harvey Dent. The artwork as well was pretty decent. Overall this volume won't exactly set the world on fire, but it is definitely a return to good form for me. I now have an ongoing Batman title that I can actually read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: Twists and turns abound as Batman teams up with Two Face to take down Kobra. I really liked the complexities of this plot. It kept me wondering where the story was going and it moved fast as a result. The art was only ok, but there were some very interesting panel layouts, especially for Two Face, that caught my eye.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    It was so nice to have "Detective Comics" go back to being an actual detective/mystery book for once. My only complaint was that Batman was a but if a chatty Cathy who was always tooting his own horn throughout the course of the book, which seemed extremely out of character. It was so nice to have "Detective Comics" go back to being an actual detective/mystery book for once. My only complaint was that Batman was a but if a chatty Cathy who was always tooting his own horn throughout the course of the book, which seemed extremely out of character.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Will Robinson Jr.

    Not bad! But not spectacular! I am big fan of the Two-face character so this book was a definite read for me. Harvey Dent has always been one of Batman's most fascinating villains. Their is just so much potential in telling a story about a character that has a ying & yang like personality. James Robinson is a wonderful comic book writer. I enjoyed his writing in Earth 2, Vol. 1: The Gathering-Earth 2, Vol. 3: Battle Cry, All-New Invaders, Vol. 1: Gods and Soldiers-All-New Invaders, Vol. 3: The M Not bad! But not spectacular! I am big fan of the Two-face character so this book was a definite read for me. Harvey Dent has always been one of Batman's most fascinating villains. Their is just so much potential in telling a story about a character that has a ying & yang like personality. James Robinson is a wonderful comic book writer. I enjoyed his writing in Earth 2, Vol. 1: The Gathering-Earth 2, Vol. 3: Battle Cry, All-New Invaders, Vol. 1: Gods and Soldiers-All-New Invaders, Vol. 3: The Martians are Coming, his underrated Fantastic Four, Volume 1: The Fall of the Fantastic Four- Fantastic Four, Volume 4: The End is Fourever run, and his work in Wonder Woman, Volume 6: Children of the Gods. Those are just a few of the books he has written I really enjoyed. I always feel a since of wonder and fun adventure in his books. This was an okay Batman story. The truth is Detective comics has been like a recovery Batman center for me since Tom King is writing the main Batman book. I have slowly begun to not like his take on Batman. The artwork and coloring really works well with the tone of the book. The pacing is where things really fell apart for me. Those who like a slow burning detective story will be okay here. The story I felt just to long to get to the action. Most of the real plot kicks in towards the end. But to Robinson's credit I love the idea of Two-face's good Harvey wanting to finish a case began as District attorney before he became the villain he is today. There will always be this tug of war between Batman's hope that he can save Harvey and the hopeless realization that he may already be gone. Overall this was a great filler story for the Detective comics series as we move into the Peter Tomasi run.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    [Read as Single Issues] Man I miss James Tynion IV's run in Detective comics . So This was good in parts , the first part of the book , running in continuity with the aftermath of the Bat-wedding , sees Batman do some Detective work , and it was fun to read that . Lately it does feel like the only detective work Batman does is punching people . This was him actually visiting crime scenes and tracing fallacies and collective evidence and then later.... well punching people . This was also the firs [Read as Single Issues] Man I miss James Tynion IV's run in Detective comics . So This was good in parts , the first part of the book , running in continuity with the aftermath of the Bat-wedding , sees Batman do some Detective work , and it was fun to read that . Lately it does feel like the only detective work Batman does is punching people . This was him actually visiting crime scenes and tracing fallacies and collective evidence and then later.... well punching people . This was also the first book that connected the Scott Snyder All Star Batman run , which I really did enjoy a lot , so I will count that as a pro for this book .And the best part of this book for me was the stunning artwork , Some of the splash panels in particular , I kept staring for way too long to appreciate them. There was also a short bit about Firefly and that was quite fascinating to read as well But the plot in the end came off as way too convoluted , with a distinct lack of a proper villain. But the most grating thing for me was how Robinson's Batman behaved , he talked too lot , he threw jokes and kept explaining things to his enemies and making puns even and acting all jovial . This was in contrast to how the story started with Bruce struggling to cope with the events of Bat-wedding . And all the chatty things really made me feel like I was reading Dick Grayson's Robin and not Bruce Wayne's Batman

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kris Ritchie

    2 for the art, but god was that story awful. If you look at other ratings of Robinson's work, you'll see I also hated his take on Wonder Woman. But I am not one to give up a series, without at least giving the new team a shot. So what can I say I liked? Well, the art was great and the colors seemed really rich. I think part of that is also DC's switch to a new style of paper for their trades which seems less reflective of the ink (no more overhead lights r lamps casting a reflection!). But Robinson 2 for the art, but god was that story awful. If you look at other ratings of Robinson's work, you'll see I also hated his take on Wonder Woman. But I am not one to give up a series, without at least giving the new team a shot. So what can I say I liked? Well, the art was great and the colors seemed really rich. I think part of that is also DC's switch to a new style of paper for their trades which seems less reflective of the ink (no more overhead lights r lamps casting a reflection!). But Robinson wrote Batman like he was a quipping combination of Bart Simpson and Peter Parker. So thanks but no thanks. Next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    It's a decent enough Two Face story, but the dialog just isn't very good, and the character motivations are somewhat lacking. Also, Robinson is clearly not collaborating with King at all, because his version of Batman, post non-wedding, is completely different from King's version. And to be honest, King's version strikes me as much more likely. It's a decent enough Two Face story, but the dialog just isn't very good, and the character motivations are somewhat lacking. Also, Robinson is clearly not collaborating with King at all, because his version of Batman, post non-wedding, is completely different from King's version. And to be honest, King's version strikes me as much more likely.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarospice

    Doesn't deliver the bang you'd think this team up would. Someone do a wellness check on Robinson. He hasn't been good for a long time now. Doesn't deliver the bang you'd think this team up would. Someone do a wellness check on Robinson. He hasn't been good for a long time now.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lucille

    booooooring

  18. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Poor dialgoue poor plotting with so so art. Cant wait for the new author.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 🌟 Batman and Two-Face stop Kobra from taking over Gotham.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    I do enjoy Two Face and Batman together.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Two-face's scarred psyche had been explored before, and better. Chatty, angsty Batman should never be eplored again. Two-face's scarred psyche had been explored before, and better. Chatty, angsty Batman should never be eplored again.

  22. 5 out of 5

    M

    James Robinson, Stephen Segovia, and Carmine di Giandomenico turn the spotlight on Two-Face for this ninth volume of the Detective Comics series. Unsettled after being left at the altar by Catwoman, Batman decides to lose himself in a traditional murder mystery to clear his head. Yet the deceased turns out to be using another dead man’s alias - and part of a Kobra terrorist cell. The links in the chain lead to a pair of Fireflies operating as arsonists for hire, and a cold case prosecuted by one James Robinson, Stephen Segovia, and Carmine di Giandomenico turn the spotlight on Two-Face for this ninth volume of the Detective Comics series. Unsettled after being left at the altar by Catwoman, Batman decides to lose himself in a traditional murder mystery to clear his head. Yet the deceased turns out to be using another dead man’s alias - and part of a Kobra terrorist cell. The links in the chain lead to a pair of Fireflies operating as arsonists for hire, and a cold case prosecuted by one Harvey Dent. Things take a twist when Harvey saves the GCPD from Kobra, and even teams with Batman to take down the multiple schemes in play all around Gotham. Though he seemingly goes out with a bang, the Dark Knight knows Two-Face will resurface once again. Robinson tries to set up a nice murder mystery, but opts to discard it in favor of a fanboy teamup instead. He tries too hard to get Harvey Dent involved in the Kobra conspiracy, allowing the thin plot to overtake the characters. The introduction of the new Firefly and their eventual swarm is a woefully overlooked idea; here’s hoping it makes a resurgence somewhere down the line. The art chores are done well by both Segovia and di Giandomenico, despite being given very little to work with. Detective Comics: Deface the Face would benefit from some facial reconstruction surgery in order to stand with the best of Batman lore.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Detective Comics: Deface the Face picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next six issues (Detective Comics #988–993) of the 2016 on-going series and covers one story: "Deface the Face". "Deface the Face" is a six-issue storyline (Detective Comics #988–993) has Bruce Wayne as Batman investigating a murder cases that links the identity of the victim leads to a conspiracy among the strangest foes in Jason Burr as Kobra and his Cobra Cult, Deefer Tweed as Tweedledee, Dumfree T Detective Comics: Deface the Face picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next six issues (Detective Comics #988–993) of the 2016 on-going series and covers one story: "Deface the Face". "Deface the Face" is a six-issue storyline (Detective Comics #988–993) has Bruce Wayne as Batman investigating a murder cases that links the identity of the victim leads to a conspiracy among the strangest foes in Jason Burr as Kobra and his Cobra Cult, Deefer Tweed as Tweedledee, Dumfree Tweed as Tweedledum, Ted Carson as Firefly, introducing Bridget Pike as Lady Firefly, and Harvey Dent as Two-Face. James Robinson penned the entire trade paperback. For the most part, it is written rather somewhat well and tries to connected lesser villains to the Cobra Cult and Two-Face. However, in the end, the execution was done rather poorly with wooden dialogue and ultimately a forgettable story. Stephen Segovia (Detective Comics #988–990) and Carmine Di Giandomenico (Detective Comics #991–993) penciled the entire trade paperback. For the most part, their penciling styles are rather distinct and somewhat meshed well with each other, making the artistic flow rather rough. All in all, Detective Comics: Deface the Face is a somewhat good continuation to what would hopefully be a wonderful series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars. When crime scenes start revealing things in twos (The Tweedles as well as both Fireflys), you know that Two-Face can't be far behind. This Volume gives the character a new and welcome depth that we haven't seen for a while. Batman is investigating a simple murder, or at least it seems simple. When you tie in that the victim was the last criminal Harvey Dent failed to put behind bars before his accident, AND that the diseased was recently was a part of the re-emerging Kobra Cult, Bats he 3.5 Stars. When crime scenes start revealing things in twos (The Tweedles as well as both Fireflys), you know that Two-Face can't be far behind. This Volume gives the character a new and welcome depth that we haven't seen for a while. Batman is investigating a simple murder, or at least it seems simple. When you tie in that the victim was the last criminal Harvey Dent failed to put behind bars before his accident, AND that the diseased was recently was a part of the re-emerging Kobra Cult, Bats heads off to find the dual natured criminal. He finds a man divided even more so than usual. We learn that the evil Two-Face identity hadn't killed Twist, the good Harvey identity had done it in a fit of rage. In an effort to keep "Harvey" as the moral side of Two-Face, the bad persona frames himself for the murder and works with Batman and Gordon to shut down the Kobra Cult. Also, Two-Face "dies" in an explosion during the battle... but Batman tracks him down quickly and finds that he is selling some of Kobra's toxins to Leviathan. When will Leviathan's motives reveal themselves? Which graphic novel am I missing? Overall, a good Volume. Simple, straightforward, and the entire story contained in one book. Recommend

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    When he's not playing around in a Golden Age of Silver Age playground, James Robinson can be very hit or miss. But it was nice to see him running Batman through his paces. Not only that, but in a story that at least for the first two acts is an actual mystery. Detective Comics rarely if ever really plays with its original idea, Batman is the world's greatest detective. Not only that but it makes interesting use of Two-Face and manages to use Kobra without turning it into a racist and xenophobic When he's not playing around in a Golden Age of Silver Age playground, James Robinson can be very hit or miss. But it was nice to see him running Batman through his paces. Not only that, but in a story that at least for the first two acts is an actual mystery. Detective Comics rarely if ever really plays with its original idea, Batman is the world's greatest detective. Not only that but it makes interesting use of Two-Face and manages to use Kobra without turning it into a racist and xenophobic conspiracy theorists wet dream that cause me to saw he's a character DC should have put him out to pasture back in my days as a fanzine columnist. The story has its flaws but it hits just the right balance for me of Batman going in over his head without going cosmic on his own. Overall, good job.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I wanted to like this more than I did. It was fun, and a bit old-fashioned, in a way. It doesn't make a lot of sense, though, and I'm not a huge fan of either of the artists who worked on this arc. (They're fine, but just not my style.) The story is somewhat clever, though it relies on Batman and Gordon doing some pretty dumb things, just to advance the plot. There are moments of dialog that reminded me of how good a writer Robinson can be. (There's some good Batman/Alfred banter, and Batman/Gord I wanted to like this more than I did. It was fun, and a bit old-fashioned, in a way. It doesn't make a lot of sense, though, and I'm not a huge fan of either of the artists who worked on this arc. (They're fine, but just not my style.) The story is somewhat clever, though it relies on Batman and Gordon doing some pretty dumb things, just to advance the plot. There are moments of dialog that reminded me of how good a writer Robinson can be. (There's some good Batman/Alfred banter, and Batman/Gordon banter. There's some pretty clunky narration too though.) I also appreciate that this is a complete story, with a clear ending. Too many arcs these days manage to fill six issues without even telling a complete story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    New regular writer James Robinson puts the detective back into Detective Comics. A seemingly routine murder quickly displays multiple layers of complexity, leading Batman to a race to stop terrorists from decimating Gotham City. Batman works mostly alone in this arc, but doesn't shy away from getting help from his Bat-family when needed, and also help from one of his most deranged foes. Although there are a few loose ends, likely leading to some bigger problems for Batman, this volume is essenti New regular writer James Robinson puts the detective back into Detective Comics. A seemingly routine murder quickly displays multiple layers of complexity, leading Batman to a race to stop terrorists from decimating Gotham City. Batman works mostly alone in this arc, but doesn't shy away from getting help from his Bat-family when needed, and also help from one of his most deranged foes. Although there are a few loose ends, likely leading to some bigger problems for Batman, this volume is essentially self-contained. The artwork by Segovia and Di Giandomenico is complementary and is not distractingly different. It's dark and moody crimefighting we like to see from a Batman story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Well that was dumb. The only person who can help Batman stop Kobra, a new terrorist organization, is Two-Face. Why? The reasons are convoluted and honestly not worth dissecting. Two-Face switches from villain to hero basically instantly. It's all-together absurd. The art is decent and the action scenes are good. There's an intriguing subplot for Firefly, but it's underdeveloped. Pretty much everything here is underdeveloped. Deface the Face is a thought experiment - what if Two-Face switched side Well that was dumb. The only person who can help Batman stop Kobra, a new terrorist organization, is Two-Face. Why? The reasons are convoluted and honestly not worth dissecting. Two-Face switches from villain to hero basically instantly. It's all-together absurd. The art is decent and the action scenes are good. There's an intriguing subplot for Firefly, but it's underdeveloped. Pretty much everything here is underdeveloped. Deface the Face is a thought experiment - what if Two-Face switched sides? Turns out there's not much to the answer.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    Wow, this was superbly terrible. Like extravagantly awful. The dialogue is just so bad. I don't know what else to say... At first, I thought an honest and "candid" Batman was novel, but then after a few pages, I just realized he was out of character. His interactions with Alfred (my usual, no matter the book, in-character stalwart rock) and Jim Gordon were cringy and stilted. The art was ok/good (I liked the art by Stephen Segovia #988-990). I liked the colors and mate pages. 1.5 stars. Wow, this was superbly terrible. Like extravagantly awful. The dialogue is just so bad. I don't know what else to say... At first, I thought an honest and "candid" Batman was novel, but then after a few pages, I just realized he was out of character. His interactions with Alfred (my usual, no matter the book, in-character stalwart rock) and Jim Gordon were cringy and stilted. The art was ok/good (I liked the art by Stephen Segovia #988-990). I liked the colors and mate pages. 1.5 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    *I’ve read A LOT and not reviewed in a long time, so to catch up: Three sentence reviews! (More or less.)* After all the doom and gloom of the wedding-that-didn't-happen, this felt more like a classic Batman adventure: Two-Face and Batman team-up to save Gotham. It had action, some nice emotion, and even a couple decent twists and turns. Nothing super dramatic, but that's what we need after the intensity of the last couple volumes. Enjoyable from start to finish. *I’ve read A LOT and not reviewed in a long time, so to catch up: Three sentence reviews! (More or less.)* After all the doom and gloom of the wedding-that-didn't-happen, this felt more like a classic Batman adventure: Two-Face and Batman team-up to save Gotham. It had action, some nice emotion, and even a couple decent twists and turns. Nothing super dramatic, but that's what we need after the intensity of the last couple volumes. Enjoyable from start to finish.

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