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The Shores of Another Sea (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 3)

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Chad Oliver's The Shores of Another Sea is a chilling account of alien contact and thought-provoking look at how man regards other species and how other species might regard him across the unbridgeable gulf of separate evolutionary history and an enigmatic intelligence vastly superior to our own. Chad Oliver's The Shores of Another Sea is a chilling account of alien contact and thought-provoking look at how man regards other species and how other species might regard him across the unbridgeable gulf of separate evolutionary history and an enigmatic intelligence vastly superior to our own.


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Chad Oliver's The Shores of Another Sea is a chilling account of alien contact and thought-provoking look at how man regards other species and how other species might regard him across the unbridgeable gulf of separate evolutionary history and an enigmatic intelligence vastly superior to our own. Chad Oliver's The Shores of Another Sea is a chilling account of alien contact and thought-provoking look at how man regards other species and how other species might regard him across the unbridgeable gulf of separate evolutionary history and an enigmatic intelligence vastly superior to our own.

30 review for The Shores of Another Sea (Classics of Modern Science Fiction 3)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This is a very good alien-contact story, as well as a science fiction story that reminds us that anthropology is a science, too. Oliver is often overlooked, but was an excellent story-teller and had a knack of describing his lush settings very evocatively. His work is almost always thoughtful and enjoyable.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Picked up because I've very much enjoyed other anthropological speculative fiction by Oliver. He's intelligent, educated, and thoughtful, a joy to read. So far, about 1/3 in, this reminds me a lot of the early 'classics' by Michael Crichton. Not as intricate, so it will be shorter. But immersive and educational in the sense that Crichton and some other HF and SF can be. Haven't gotten to the SF part of this yet.... ---------- Not as analytical as the blurb and imply; turns into a somewhat more supe Picked up because I've very much enjoyed other anthropological speculative fiction by Oliver. He's intelligent, educated, and thoughtful, a joy to read. So far, about 1/3 in, this reminds me a lot of the early 'classics' by Michael Crichton. Not as intricate, so it will be shorter. But immersive and educational in the sense that Crichton and some other HF and SF can be. Haven't gotten to the SF part of this yet.... ---------- Not as analytical as the blurb and imply; turns into a somewhat more superficial adventure than I was hoping for. Still a fun fast read, esp. for those who like 'manly' books. (It's only a bit sexist, in that the one woman is respected, but this community is male-dominated by it's very nature.) Africa is another world, not just an exotic safari resort: "Some men, the dead ones that still walked, never could feel it. They were men who might glance at a trout stream in Rockies and see just another creek." "He did not move. He forced himself to stay where he was. He could not afford the luxury of [violent] action." I will continue to read Oliver's works as I find them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Rugged Outdoorsman: "The Shores of Another Sea" by Chad Oliver “Suppose that one day man landed on some distant planet. Why would he have come, what impulse would have driven him across the darkness and the light-years? Could he explain, and would he even try? If he set out to explore that fearful world, if he trapped some specimens, what would he do if he were attacked by monstrous beings he could not understand?” In “The Shores of Ano If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Rugged Outdoorsman: "The Shores of Another Sea" by Chad Oliver “Suppose that one day man landed on some distant planet. Why would he have come, what impulse would have driven him across the darkness and the light-years? Could he explain, and would he even try? If he set out to explore that fearful world, if he trapped some specimens, what would he do if he were attacked by monstrous beings he could not understand?” In “The Shores of Another Sea” by Chad Oliver Right after the Bishop’s “No Enemy but Time”, I re-read “The Shores of Another Sea” by Chad Oliver, a first contact story also set in Eastern Africa. Though it devoted a good deal of space to story elements arising from its Kenyan setting, the character setup was pretty minimal, a sympathetic protagonist built on a fairly standard “rugged outdoorsman” chassis.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah B

    This is a science fiction tale with somewhat strong elements of horror in it. Basically it's about an American living in Africa with his family. He catches baboons to send back to the US. But lately some mighty weird stuff is going on and he has to protect his family from danger...if he can. He's basically living out in the middle of nowhere and any help is far away so he's basically on his own. I really enjoyed this story. It's well written and full of suspense, the dread of the dangerous unknow This is a science fiction tale with somewhat strong elements of horror in it. Basically it's about an American living in Africa with his family. He catches baboons to send back to the US. But lately some mighty weird stuff is going on and he has to protect his family from danger...if he can. He's basically living out in the middle of nowhere and any help is far away so he's basically on his own. I really enjoyed this story. It's well written and full of suspense, the dread of the dangerous unknown building slowly. Weather events make it even worse. Blood is spilt. Truthfully I just didn't see how he was going to get out of the situation. It seemed rather hopeless and that the other side was in control. Lots of dangerous moments and uncertainty. The environment is a big part of this story and because the author had actually spent time there the land of Africa seems very real. It comes alive. And it's not just the wildlife you have to worry about out there. The story makes that very clear. There's other dangers too and some of those could kill you much faster than a leopard or a crocodile. I really liked what the main character learned at the end of the story and how he applied that to Big Buck. There are lessons and similies in here if you pay attention.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Oliver writes exotic man-against-nature adventure that is much better than average fare here. Unfortunately, the SciFi element is tossed-together, unconvincing, and goes nowhere. For a better book with much of the same appeal (but no SF, and closer to horror-suspense), I recommend Geoffrey Household's Dance of the Dwarfs. Oliver writes exotic man-against-nature adventure that is much better than average fare here. Unfortunately, the SciFi element is tossed-together, unconvincing, and goes nowhere. For a better book with much of the same appeal (but no SF, and closer to horror-suspense), I recommend Geoffrey Household's Dance of the Dwarfs.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I like Chad Oliver's anthropological science fiction. I like Chad Oliver's anthropological science fiction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bill FromPA

    A tale of African adventure into which a horror / SF plot is gradually introduced. With a handful of people menaced by a largely unseen extraterrestrial threat, there's a strong B-movie vibe, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. (view spoiler)[The ending both undercuts and reinforces the B-movie impression: there's no climactic violent human vs. alien confrontation in which the invaders are vanquished, but the imperiled young daughter of the protagonist improbably (to me) survives her abduction A tale of African adventure into which a horror / SF plot is gradually introduced. With a handful of people menaced by a largely unseen extraterrestrial threat, there's a strong B-movie vibe, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. (view spoiler)[The ending both undercuts and reinforces the B-movie impression: there's no climactic violent human vs. alien confrontation in which the invaders are vanquished, but the imperiled young daughter of the protagonist improbably (to me) survives her abduction unharmed. I can't really fault this happy ending as a concession to audience expectations, as it evidently embodies the message Oliver wanted his novel to convey, as indicated in its epigraph, from which the title is taken. But the behavior of the aliens up to that point, as far as it can be humanly understood, hardly makes such an ending seem likely. (hide spoiler)]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joachim Boaz

    Full review: https://sciencefictionruminations.com... "Chad Oliver is a well-known proponent of anthropological science fiction. John Clute (of SF encyclopedia) proclaims him “pioneer in the application of competent anthropological thought to sf themes.” Despite being relatively prolific between the 50s-70s (a handful of short stories appeared in the 80s), The Shores of Another Sea (1971) retains a distinctly 50s tone, style, [...]" Full review: https://sciencefictionruminations.com... "Chad Oliver is a well-known proponent of anthropological science fiction. John Clute (of SF encyclopedia) proclaims him “pioneer in the application of competent anthropological thought to sf themes.” Despite being relatively prolific between the 50s-70s (a handful of short stories appeared in the 80s), The Shores of Another Sea (1971) retains a distinctly 50s tone, style, [...]"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brent Winslow

    As interesting in the descriptions of running a Baboonery in Kenya as the alien contact story. The author - Chad Oliver - was chair of the department of anthropology at the University of Texas - Austin, which is obvious in his academic descriptions of Kenya's people, weather, and fauna. As interesting in the descriptions of running a Baboonery in Kenya as the alien contact story. The author - Chad Oliver - was chair of the department of anthropology at the University of Texas - Austin, which is obvious in his academic descriptions of Kenya's people, weather, and fauna.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Simón

    3.5. Buena prosa, paisajes y ambientación cautivante, pero la trama se queda corta. Una historia más bien pulp.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Blackburn

    A first contact story with an anthropological twist, The Shores of Another Sea, first published in 1971, is one of Chad Oliver's best Science Fiction novels. The action takes place in a remote station on the African plains of Kenya. The baboons are acting strange. Royce Crawford, a transplanted Texan and his family, feel suddenly threatened. Soon they are cut off from the rest of the world by torrential rains and must face new threats alone. Calamity and catastrophe follow and Royce must use all A first contact story with an anthropological twist, The Shores of Another Sea, first published in 1971, is one of Chad Oliver's best Science Fiction novels. The action takes place in a remote station on the African plains of Kenya. The baboons are acting strange. Royce Crawford, a transplanted Texan and his family, feel suddenly threatened. Soon they are cut off from the rest of the world by torrential rains and must face new threats alone. Calamity and catastrophe follow and Royce must use all his intellect and will to survive. Something or someone is studying them and that someone is not averse to using fear and intimidation. Finally, Royce must make the ultimate sacrifice in order to see his family freed. This is a moving and fast-paced story of a man coming to terms with and understanding of his own humanity and the best way to display his new-found insight. I recommend any and all of Chad Oliver's works, all done with a restrained and humane outlook.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sidra

    The first sci fi book I ever read and I loved it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cws

    SF-Oli

  14. 4 out of 5

    George Bradford

    Anthropology professor Chad Oliver was a founding father of science fiction writing. His stories are wonderful.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Osier

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellem_world •

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve Johnsen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Agostino De matteis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carol Tensen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tbfrank

  23. 4 out of 5

    Øyvind

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pierre Eklöf

  25. 4 out of 5

    William

  26. 4 out of 5

    CRB

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hendrik

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keith Bastianini

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marzell

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