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Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform Education

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New in Paperback! Make learning more meaningful by teaching the "whole game" David Perkins, a noted authority on teaching and learning and co-director of Harvard's Project Zero, introduces a practical and research-based framework for teaching. He describes how teaching any subject at any level can be made more effective if students are introduced to the "whole game," rathe New in Paperback! Make learning more meaningful by teaching the "whole game" David Perkins, a noted authority on teaching and learning and co-director of Harvard's Project Zero, introduces a practical and research-based framework for teaching. He describes how teaching any subject at any level can be made more effective if students are introduced to the "whole game," rather than isolated pieces of a discipline. Perkins explains how learning academic subjects should be approached like learning baseball or any game, and he demonstrates this with seven principles for making learning whole: from making the game worth playing (emphasizing the importance of motivation to sustained learning), to working on the hard parts (the importance of thoughtful practice), to learning how to learn (developing self-managed learners). Vividly explains how to organize learning in ways that allow people to do important things with what they know Offers guidelines for transforming education to prepare our youth for success in a rapidly changing world Filled with real-world, illustrative examples of the seven principles At the end of each chapter, Perkins includes "Wonders of Learning," a summary of the key ideas.


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New in Paperback! Make learning more meaningful by teaching the "whole game" David Perkins, a noted authority on teaching and learning and co-director of Harvard's Project Zero, introduces a practical and research-based framework for teaching. He describes how teaching any subject at any level can be made more effective if students are introduced to the "whole game," rathe New in Paperback! Make learning more meaningful by teaching the "whole game" David Perkins, a noted authority on teaching and learning and co-director of Harvard's Project Zero, introduces a practical and research-based framework for teaching. He describes how teaching any subject at any level can be made more effective if students are introduced to the "whole game," rather than isolated pieces of a discipline. Perkins explains how learning academic subjects should be approached like learning baseball or any game, and he demonstrates this with seven principles for making learning whole: from making the game worth playing (emphasizing the importance of motivation to sustained learning), to working on the hard parts (the importance of thoughtful practice), to learning how to learn (developing self-managed learners). Vividly explains how to organize learning in ways that allow people to do important things with what they know Offers guidelines for transforming education to prepare our youth for success in a rapidly changing world Filled with real-world, illustrative examples of the seven principles At the end of each chapter, Perkins includes "Wonders of Learning," a summary of the key ideas.

30 review for Making Learning Whole: How Seven Principles of Teaching Can Transform Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    This was recommended by one of my colleagues from the Center for Teaching and Learning. I really didn't know what I was in for...I was just attracted by the title. I appreciated the author's paradigm shifting metaphor for learning. He suggests that our approach to instruction should be more like teaching baseball. Instead of dissecting learning into isolated facts and skills, we need to start by exposing students to the "whole game". In the health professions, this may mean exposing them to pati This was recommended by one of my colleagues from the Center for Teaching and Learning. I really didn't know what I was in for...I was just attracted by the title. I appreciated the author's paradigm shifting metaphor for learning. He suggests that our approach to instruction should be more like teaching baseball. Instead of dissecting learning into isolated facts and skills, we need to start by exposing students to the "whole game". In the health professions, this may mean exposing them to patient care, even when they can't care for patients yet. The author pushes his metaphor further by suggesting that we also need to pay attention to things like "playing out of town" (learning to perform when the circumstances aren't exactly the same) and "learning from the team" (observing others, receiving mentorship from others, not focusing solely on learning from teachers). Once again, my reading was made more meaningful by reading this with a colleague (thanks Nikki!) and discussing the implications of each strategy the author advocates. I would recommend reading this book over time and pondering changes that might be possible. The author fosters this by closing each chapter with a series of questions to ask yourself to start moving in the directions discussed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Harvard professor David Perkins writes an engaging and unpretentious book of educational theory based, of all things, on a baseball game. That is, he uses seven principles that work for both baseball and teaching, further breaking the principles down into more detailed theories. The seven are: 1. Play the Whole Game 2. Make the Game Worth Playing 3. Work on the Hard Parts 4. Play Out of Town 5. Uncover the Hidden Game 6. Learn from the Team 7. Learn the Game of Learning Each principle gets its own chapt Harvard professor David Perkins writes an engaging and unpretentious book of educational theory based, of all things, on a baseball game. That is, he uses seven principles that work for both baseball and teaching, further breaking the principles down into more detailed theories. The seven are: 1. Play the Whole Game 2. Make the Game Worth Playing 3. Work on the Hard Parts 4. Play Out of Town 5. Uncover the Hidden Game 6. Learn from the Team 7. Learn the Game of Learning Each principle gets its own chapter with examples and exhaustive explanation. Mostly, however, the book deals in theories, and sometimes Perkins floats off on his abstract raft a bit too much, but overall, the self-evident principles are sound and grounded in all manner of research (as he points out). For beginning teachers, his humor and disarmingly easy style makes for a perfect introduction to recent theories on how to teach. And for grizzled veterans, the book gives a nice theoretical foundation for the practices and strategies they've learned from other, more explicit professional development authors who deal more in the "how-to," the strategies and ideas, all ready to go for the classroom.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fawn Georgina

    This book proposes some useful principles of effective teaching and learning, but it certainly doesn't share anything new and groundbreaking. It is often said that in education, seemingly new initiatives are really just old best practices repackaged with a new fancy title. The seven principles in this book are indeed second nature to truly good teaching. But that being said, it is nearly impossible to do them all at once and to get it right. Perkins' writing also gets side tracked throughout his This book proposes some useful principles of effective teaching and learning, but it certainly doesn't share anything new and groundbreaking. It is often said that in education, seemingly new initiatives are really just old best practices repackaged with a new fancy title. The seven principles in this book are indeed second nature to truly good teaching. But that being said, it is nearly impossible to do them all at once and to get it right. Perkins' writing also gets side tracked throughout his explanations and it is easy to lose the point he is getting to with his long, comma laden lists. And although his principles may seem useful at face value and most educators would agree with the importance of the applications of his principles, the book does not offer practical application of these principles. Perkins relates stories of how they could be performed with no concrete suggestions of how to do this in the classroom. So the book ends up being reflective and conceptual rather than practical.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    David Perkins lays out a comprehensive framework for learning theory wrapped around the metaphor of "playing the whole game." Drawing upon research across the range of education, psychology, and learning theories, Perkins makes the convincing argument that to learn anything deeply people need to engage in seven core principles. Using the "whole game" metaphor, the seven principles are: 1. Play the Whole Game (engage in an authentic full version of the content or skills that you want to learn), David Perkins lays out a comprehensive framework for learning theory wrapped around the metaphor of "playing the whole game." Drawing upon research across the range of education, psychology, and learning theories, Perkins makes the convincing argument that to learn anything deeply people need to engage in seven core principles. Using the "whole game" metaphor, the seven principles are: 1. Play the Whole Game (engage in an authentic full version of the content or skills that you want to learn), 2. Make the Game Worth Playing (find what will motivate you to learn), 3. Work on the Hard Parts (focus on the parts of what you are learning that are difficult with deliberate practice), 4. Play Out of Town (be mindful of how you will transfer the learning to different contexts), 5. Uncover the Hidden Game (learn the underlying rules, strategies, and processes of the topic), 6. Learn from the Team (utilize the social context of the learning environment to construct understanding), and 7. Learn the Game of Learning (be metacognitive about the learning processes). This is a powerful synopsis of how to structure learning experiences and should be read by everyone interested in education.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Juggleandhope

    Great introduction to teaching for meaningful learning. The basic framework feels simple but also full of possibilities and nuance. Really appreciated the emphasis on teaching only what really matters and the specific criteria the author proposes for that - "disciplinary significance", "societal significance", "personal significance" (for learners & teacher), and "charisma". His criteria for charisma are, "Are the ideas magnetic, alluring, arresting?". I'm thinking about how to integrate this fr Great introduction to teaching for meaningful learning. The basic framework feels simple but also full of possibilities and nuance. Really appreciated the emphasis on teaching only what really matters and the specific criteria the author proposes for that - "disciplinary significance", "societal significance", "personal significance" (for learners & teacher), and "charisma". His criteria for charisma are, "Are the ideas magnetic, alluring, arresting?". I'm thinking about how to integrate this framework with the challenge-based learning with the idea of carefully tracking growth on prioritized standards.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Cassie

    There's so much in this book to motivate and inspire students of education. Whether you are an education administrator, a teacher, parent or student, Perkins offers in this book highly salient ways of thinking about thinking and learning about knowledge that should inform schools and education practice throughout the country. Chapter 5 "Uncover the Hidden Game" should be required reading for anyone with an interest in schools. Start there. There's so much in this book to motivate and inspire students of education. Whether you are an education administrator, a teacher, parent or student, Perkins offers in this book highly salient ways of thinking about thinking and learning about knowledge that should inform schools and education practice throughout the country. Chapter 5 "Uncover the Hidden Game" should be required reading for anyone with an interest in schools. Start there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Interesting ideas about making learning more natural. Takes ideas from how we learn in informal/non-school settings and tries to see how we could apply those ideas to school learning for more engagement and understanding. Great applications in non-school settings too. I've got some ideas to try out in my classroom next fall and know I will find more when I re-read it at some point... Interesting ideas about making learning more natural. Takes ideas from how we learn in informal/non-school settings and tries to see how we could apply those ideas to school learning for more engagement and understanding. Great applications in non-school settings too. I've got some ideas to try out in my classroom next fall and know I will find more when I re-read it at some point...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I read this with other colleagues at work. Most of the instructors do not have formal training in teaching so this may be useful -- a sort of "crash course" MAT... I didn't think it was that wonderful, but certainly the ideas in it are sound. I read this with other colleagues at work. Most of the instructors do not have formal training in teaching so this may be useful -- a sort of "crash course" MAT... I didn't think it was that wonderful, but certainly the ideas in it are sound.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy Scheck

    This book models what it is trying to teach in the best way! The best advice for teachers comes at the end- "skim" and use what works for you. I will definitely integrate some key ideas from the book into my practice. This book models what it is trying to teach in the best way! The best advice for teachers comes at the end- "skim" and use what works for you. I will definitely integrate some key ideas from the book into my practice.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Good - a little long winded (read: not very entertaining) when many of the concepts could been clearly made with an example or two and then move on. Some good points here that are always worth revisiting for all educators. My favorite: play out of town.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Thinking about his ideas, layered on my beliefs and practices re: reading/writing workshop, layered on TEACHING WITH POVERTY IN MIND.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Even though I'm only to chapter 2, I can tell that this will be one of my most referenced books as I work with educators. More later after I've read more. Even though I'm only to chapter 2, I can tell that this will be one of my most referenced books as I work with educators. More later after I've read more.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    This book has been helpful not only for classroom use but in any teaching situation, especially parenting.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris Heim

    I felt this book was long on ideas that are not as profound as the author would have you believe, and too often vacillating as to whether to be an easily accessible read or a textbook.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephenmrichardson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rob Levit

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Williams

  18. 5 out of 5

    George Disher

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Hingely

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julián Hidalgo

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adam Dube

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candace Saar

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juvenzeng

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Chronz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeralyn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Natpat Mon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sunderland

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pete Welter

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mer Lara

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Pelich

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