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New to Big: How Established Businesses Can Grow Like Startups

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In The Growth OS, startup guru David Kidder and the Bionic Team reveal their blueprint for helping companies recapture their growth skills--by funding a portfolio of startups and monitoring their progress to encourage entrepreneurship within companies. When David Kidder was invited to speak at GE's annual leadership conference in 2012, he yelled down to chairman and CEO Jef In The Growth OS, startup guru David Kidder and the Bionic Team reveal their blueprint for helping companies recapture their growth skills--by funding a portfolio of startups and monitoring their progress to encourage entrepreneurship within companies. When David Kidder was invited to speak at GE's annual leadership conference in 2012, he yelled down to chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt, "How many $50 million companies did you launch last year?" The answer was zero. But Immelt, rather than being angry or offended at the interruption, candidly said to his teams, "That was the most important question in the thirty-seven years of this conference." The fact is, as Kidder shows in The Growth OS, entrenched thinking and outdated bureaucracy is at war with new ideas. Yet, of the top five companies by market cap in 2001, only Microsoft remains in 2016. Traditional companies have tumbled off the list. To think like a scaled startup, companies today need to look for markets that haven't been discovered or created yet. They need to identify a customer problem and work backward from the outside in to discover a business model for that solution. The Growth OS is designed to instill the mindsets, methods, and tools that veteran venture investors and experienced entrepreneurs use to discover the future in the face of the unknowable. But even most bets placed by VC's fail, more than 80 percent of the time. That is why you need a portfolio of investments and a growth board to measure the progress of each business, only continuing to fund those that show validated progress.


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In The Growth OS, startup guru David Kidder and the Bionic Team reveal their blueprint for helping companies recapture their growth skills--by funding a portfolio of startups and monitoring their progress to encourage entrepreneurship within companies. When David Kidder was invited to speak at GE's annual leadership conference in 2012, he yelled down to chairman and CEO Jef In The Growth OS, startup guru David Kidder and the Bionic Team reveal their blueprint for helping companies recapture their growth skills--by funding a portfolio of startups and monitoring their progress to encourage entrepreneurship within companies. When David Kidder was invited to speak at GE's annual leadership conference in 2012, he yelled down to chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt, "How many $50 million companies did you launch last year?" The answer was zero. But Immelt, rather than being angry or offended at the interruption, candidly said to his teams, "That was the most important question in the thirty-seven years of this conference." The fact is, as Kidder shows in The Growth OS, entrenched thinking and outdated bureaucracy is at war with new ideas. Yet, of the top five companies by market cap in 2001, only Microsoft remains in 2016. Traditional companies have tumbled off the list. To think like a scaled startup, companies today need to look for markets that haven't been discovered or created yet. They need to identify a customer problem and work backward from the outside in to discover a business model for that solution. The Growth OS is designed to instill the mindsets, methods, and tools that veteran venture investors and experienced entrepreneurs use to discover the future in the face of the unknowable. But even most bets placed by VC's fail, more than 80 percent of the time. That is why you need a portfolio of investments and a growth board to measure the progress of each business, only continuing to fund those that show validated progress.

30 review for New to Big: How Established Businesses Can Grow Like Startups

  1. 5 out of 5

    A.G. Stranger

    "Unlike established businesses obsessed with shareholder returns, start-ups look to provide new solutions to customer problems. They seek to identify a “pain point” or “friction point” for consumers." "Unlike established businesses obsessed with shareholder returns, start-ups look to provide new solutions to customer problems. They seek to identify a “pain point” or “friction point” for consumers."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Kidder and Wallace provide a highly readable playbook for companies that deal with the many sticky issues of developing in-house farm teams. The authors argue that New to Big must sit alongside Big to Bigger in the corporate mindset. “In the same way an MBA program teaches a form of management for administering and growing existing businesses, entrepreneurship and venture capital are, together, a form of management for discovering and building new businesses. Enterprises need both,” note the auth Kidder and Wallace provide a highly readable playbook for companies that deal with the many sticky issues of developing in-house farm teams. The authors argue that New to Big must sit alongside Big to Bigger in the corporate mindset. “In the same way an MBA program teaches a form of management for administering and growing existing businesses, entrepreneurship and venture capital are, together, a form of management for discovering and building new businesses. Enterprises need both,” note the authors. They offer just a few examples of companies that have deployed these methods (Uber, Amazon, Nike, TD Ameritrade). Perhaps this area is still too new. But this is quite a thoughtful read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    According to the Small Business Administration, eighty percent of new businesses don’t make it past their first year. Those that do make it and continue to grow, focus on developing policies and procedures in pursuit of operational efficiency and long-term viability. Once you reach that ‘legacy company’ stage, the need for survival is replaced with the need for quarter-on-quarter growth. For authors David Kidder and Christina Wallace, that change comes with its own issues. In their new book New t According to the Small Business Administration, eighty percent of new businesses don’t make it past their first year. Those that do make it and continue to grow, focus on developing policies and procedures in pursuit of operational efficiency and long-term viability. Once you reach that ‘legacy company’ stage, the need for survival is replaced with the need for quarter-on-quarter growth. For authors David Kidder and Christina Wallace, that change comes with its own issues. In their new book New to Big: How Companies Can Create Like Entrepreneurs, Invest Like VCs, and Install a Permanent Operating System for Growth, they examine how big bureaucratic businesses can still discover new opportunities that and grow them into bigger businesses. Buy Your Way In One established option is to buy your way into a new opportunity by investing or purchasing outright. A new startup may have enough of a lead in the market to make an outright purchase more expedient, but you then face the challenge of assimilating that new company into your established corporate culture. Growth Operating System What if there was an established blueprint you could follow that would combine the tools, systems, and mind-sets of an entrepreneurial venture with the leverage of an established business? Kidder and Wallace’s book offers precisely that. The foundation of the Growth OS is the conviction that “world-altering businesses...can be discovered and scaled in a methodical way.” Instead of counting on continuous incremental improvement (kaizen) and operational excellence, established businesses can achieve market-leading innovation by thinking like venture capitalists (VCs) and planning to launch $50 million businesses as a core component of their long-term business strategies. This, the authors argue, requires a dramatically different perspective. Instead of looking internally at leaner operations within your existing lines of business, or potential synergies between existing divisions, New to Big companies must focus on customer problems. Startups do this with a level of passion and attention to detail that most big businesses cannot match. The Growth OS addresses that. Much of the mechanics of the Growth OS involves behaving like the over-optimistic and highly enthusiastic founders that VCs see every day. Ask your customers directly about their pain points rather than just observing their behavior through focus groups. Treat those pain points as problems to be fixed rather than projects to be investigated, and then commit to action plans to fix them. With examples as diverse as GE, TD Ameritrade, and the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), the authors present a compelling proposition for big businesses to revisit their history and start operating as much smaller ones. New to Big argues that long-term growth requires a balance of operational efficiency and entrepreneurial vision. With a comprehensive set of tools, systems, and examples, the authors map out a clear path for big businesses to identify and grow new opportunities with the same dexterity as new startups. Soundview subscribers get in-depth summaries of the key concepts in best-selling business books (like this one) delivered to them every month! Take your career to new heights by staying up-to-date with the trends and ideas affecting business leaders around the globe.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Juan Castro

    Build a Growth Mindset inside your company, and act like a startup. Modern startups have developed a more dynamic way of doing business and innovation than traditional companies. By keep continuing to seek solutions for endless customer problems, companies with a startup mindset can grow. Companies should shift from a Total Addressable Market model to a Total Addressable Problem model. Discovering new market and new solutions to grow. Anticipating what customers want (look at what customers actually Build a Growth Mindset inside your company, and act like a startup. Modern startups have developed a more dynamic way of doing business and innovation than traditional companies. By keep continuing to seek solutions for endless customer problems, companies with a startup mindset can grow. Companies should shift from a Total Addressable Market model to a Total Addressable Problem model. Discovering new market and new solutions to grow. Anticipating what customers want (look at what customers actually do, instead of what they say they’ll do in market research questionnaires) Build a good team to achieve a new-to-big philosophy. Seek out the iconoclasts, free thinkers and contrarians. They should be adaptable. They should be able to detect patterns between disparate and unrelated sources and trends and build innovative business ideas from them. They should be humble and know how to work collaboratively. It’s a team effort. Invest in new projects with more intelligent risk and dynamism. Install a Growth Board (small team at the top of the company) who will judge the merits and allocates funding and monitors development of each scheme. Investing small amounts at the beginning of each project.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mauricio Coindreau

    I would read this book only if you are planning on implementing a startup investment fund inside of an organization or if this is already installed and you want to improve it. The book has some great advice for implementing a successful internal fund with the tools to how to create teams, choose founders, track progress and measure success. I mention the first paragraph because if you are not going through this process, the book might be to specific to learn something relevant outside this space. I would read this book only if you are planning on implementing a startup investment fund inside of an organization or if this is already installed and you want to improve it. The book has some great advice for implementing a successful internal fund with the tools to how to create teams, choose founders, track progress and measure success. I mention the first paragraph because if you are not going through this process, the book might be to specific to learn something relevant outside this space. That being said, if you are buying the book for this particular reason, you will for sure enjoy the content, the writing and the overall thoughtful experience that went into the publication. Personally I really enjoyed it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Plamann

    Kidder and Wallace have produced an exceptional playbook for business owners, executives, entrepreneurs, and anyone interested in the inner workings of successful companies. It is a delightful read, free of heavy indistry jargon, with real-world insights and clever tips for success. It is a fresh, open-minded approach to leadership that leaves readers invigorated and equipped to tackle challenges.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Cuatrecasas

    I didn’t expect to even like this book but I ended up LOVING it! David explains so well how to use one of the most important tools companies have - talented and committed people. Decision-makers of every “traditional” company should read this book. In fact I’d say it is required reading. Today you either think big - and GO big - or you die. There are only a few ways to “go big” and “new to big” is one of them!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jap Hengky

    Big companies seeking growth must act with the dynamism and flexibility of new start-ups. Otherwise, they face stagnation and obsolescence. The key to growth is to provide new solutions to customer pain points, which can be ascertained by an attentive approach to market research. To introduce this growth model into a big organization, a special team of maverick innovators must be employed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aniq N

    I was fortunate enough to get an advance copy of this book. David and Christina did a wonderful job explaining a framework for large corporations to streamline thinking and innovate. This is should be required reading for big companies to compete in the modern era of capitalism.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    A good playbook for enterprise to innovate from new to big, from big to bigger. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER2h8... (done) https://shows.acast.com/mastering-inn... (done) Table of Contents 1 New to Big 1 2 How We Got Here 10 3 From TAM to TAP 23 4 The Growth Leader Challenge 40 5 Discover a Big, Unmet Customer Need 70 6 Validate Like an Entrepreneur 91 7 Invest Like a VC 120 8 It All Comes Down to People 146 9 Install a Permanent Growth Capability 167 10 Go on Offense 196 Acknowledgments 203 Glossary 207 N A good playbook for enterprise to innovate from new to big, from big to bigger. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER2h8... (done) https://shows.acast.com/mastering-inn... (done) Table of Contents 1 New to Big 1 2 How We Got Here 10 3 From TAM to TAP 23 4 The Growth Leader Challenge 40 5 Discover a Big, Unmet Customer Need 70 6 Validate Like an Entrepreneur 91 7 Invest Like a VC 120 8 It All Comes Down to People 146 9 Install a Permanent Growth Capability 167 10 Go on Offense 196 Acknowledgments 203 Glossary 207 Notes 209 Resources 217 Index 223

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Cowie

    To be reviewed in the May-June issue of Global Business and Organizational Excellence.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mcmillin

  13. 4 out of 5

    BG

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Ikeda

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aileen Tse

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Sauriol

  17. 4 out of 5

    TΞΞL❍CK Mith!lesh

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Robinson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stu Iverson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alexandros Moutopoulos

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Crown

  22. 4 out of 5

    Em Bambi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  24. 5 out of 5

    irfan bekleyen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian Spitler

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Stufflebeam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Product Pearson

  29. 4 out of 5

    David

  30. 5 out of 5

    William Wang

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