Hot Best Seller

Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive

Availability: Ready to download

Play is how children explore, discover, fail, succeed, socialize, and flourish. It is a fundamental element of the human condition. It's the key to giving schoolchildren skills they need to succeed--skills like creativity, innovation, teamwork, focus, resilience, expressiveness, empathy, concentration, and executive function. Expert organizations such as the American Acade Play is how children explore, discover, fail, succeed, socialize, and flourish. It is a fundamental element of the human condition. It's the key to giving schoolchildren skills they need to succeed--skills like creativity, innovation, teamwork, focus, resilience, expressiveness, empathy, concentration, and executive function. Expert organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Centers for Disease Control agree that play and physical activity are critical foundations of childhood, academics, and future skills--yet politicians are destroying play in childhood education and replacing it with standardization, stress, and forcible physical restraint, which are damaging to learning and corrosive to society. But this is not the case for hundreds of thousands of lucky children who are enjoying the power of play in schools in China, Texas, Oklahoma, Long Island, Scotland, and in the entire nation of Finland. In Let the Children Play, Pasi Sahlberg, Finnish educator and scholar, and Fulbright Scholar William Doyle make the case for helping schools and children thrive by unleashing the power of play and giving more physical and intellectual play to all schoolchildren. In the course of writing this book, Sahlberg and Doyle traveled worldwide, reviewed over 700 research studies, and conducted interviews with over 50 of the world's leading authorities on education. Most intriguingly, Let the Children Play provides a glimpse into the play-based experiments ongoing now all over the world, from rural China, Singapore, and Scotland to North Texas and Oklahoma, as well as the promising results of these bold new approaches. Readers will find the book to be both a call for change and a guide for making that change happen in their own communities.


Compare

Play is how children explore, discover, fail, succeed, socialize, and flourish. It is a fundamental element of the human condition. It's the key to giving schoolchildren skills they need to succeed--skills like creativity, innovation, teamwork, focus, resilience, expressiveness, empathy, concentration, and executive function. Expert organizations such as the American Acade Play is how children explore, discover, fail, succeed, socialize, and flourish. It is a fundamental element of the human condition. It's the key to giving schoolchildren skills they need to succeed--skills like creativity, innovation, teamwork, focus, resilience, expressiveness, empathy, concentration, and executive function. Expert organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Centers for Disease Control agree that play and physical activity are critical foundations of childhood, academics, and future skills--yet politicians are destroying play in childhood education and replacing it with standardization, stress, and forcible physical restraint, which are damaging to learning and corrosive to society. But this is not the case for hundreds of thousands of lucky children who are enjoying the power of play in schools in China, Texas, Oklahoma, Long Island, Scotland, and in the entire nation of Finland. In Let the Children Play, Pasi Sahlberg, Finnish educator and scholar, and Fulbright Scholar William Doyle make the case for helping schools and children thrive by unleashing the power of play and giving more physical and intellectual play to all schoolchildren. In the course of writing this book, Sahlberg and Doyle traveled worldwide, reviewed over 700 research studies, and conducted interviews with over 50 of the world's leading authorities on education. Most intriguingly, Let the Children Play provides a glimpse into the play-based experiments ongoing now all over the world, from rural China, Singapore, and Scotland to North Texas and Oklahoma, as well as the promising results of these bold new approaches. Readers will find the book to be both a call for change and a guide for making that change happen in their own communities.

30 review for Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive

  1. 5 out of 5

    Yasin Denli

    Here is the basic layout: play is important, American kids don't play and American schools are horrible, Finnish schools are great and some promising research and some play initiatives. Though the layout was disappointing and cliché, still it was a good read. Here is the basic layout: play is important, American kids don't play and American schools are horrible, Finnish schools are great and some promising research and some play initiatives. Though the layout was disappointing and cliché, still it was a good read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    gold

    This book is far too long for the point it tries to make. After a while, it gets seriously repetitive and redundant. I think it might've greatly benefitted from more economical writing and/or a more thorough editing. I agree with the point it makes but the writing style burries expert opinions under a ton of unnecessary passages that do nothing but repeat the same 2 pieces of information over and over again, ruins the humane side of the writers' personal experiences with out of place data, and l This book is far too long for the point it tries to make. After a while, it gets seriously repetitive and redundant. I think it might've greatly benefitted from more economical writing and/or a more thorough editing. I agree with the point it makes but the writing style burries expert opinions under a ton of unnecessary passages that do nothing but repeat the same 2 pieces of information over and over again, ruins the humane side of the writers' personal experiences with out of place data, and leaves such little place for the voices it insists must be heard on this particular topic: children's. So it's well researched and includes a great deal of valuable information yet the writing styles leaves a lot to be desired.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Baruzzini

    I enjoyed the premise of the book but was looking for more practical information. The book read very much as research, which is excellent to have but not something I would necessarily pick up to read again. I did really appreciate the global perspectives on learning and play as well as the comprehensive list of ways little old me could take action to speak up for “play” in my slice of life. This was toward the end of the book. Overall, has me really thinking a lot about how to even approach the I enjoyed the premise of the book but was looking for more practical information. The book read very much as research, which is excellent to have but not something I would necessarily pick up to read again. I did really appreciate the global perspectives on learning and play as well as the comprehensive list of ways little old me could take action to speak up for “play” in my slice of life. This was toward the end of the book. Overall, has me really thinking a lot about how to even approach the day with my kids, let alone the decisions we’ll be making as a family about the kids’ education.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Every school administrator should read this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lara Mckaye

    I read this as the beginning step in research for my master's thesis. This is my off the cuff quick reflection after reading: An in-depth look at the benefits of play in learning, especially in early childhood development, the reasoning behind unfortunate disappearance of quality play in many school systems, especially in the USA (a term that they coin - GERM), and global case studies of systems and programs that have successfully implemented play. They look at the culture of standardization as I read this as the beginning step in research for my master's thesis. This is my off the cuff quick reflection after reading: An in-depth look at the benefits of play in learning, especially in early childhood development, the reasoning behind unfortunate disappearance of quality play in many school systems, especially in the USA (a term that they coin - GERM), and global case studies of systems and programs that have successfully implemented play. They look at the culture of standardization as one that kills innovation and creativity and poses research-based alternatives. Sahlberg and Doyle use a large amount of source material from published pieces in peer-reviewed journals, the American Academy of Pediatrics report (2018), their own experience, and conversations with countless education experts. The book is an easy read that does not require a background in education theory and is a great resource for parents, teachers, policymakers, and youth advocates. It gives a great detailed look into the Finnish school system and their use of play and includes small vignettes of other schools and programs (Anji Play in China, Fuji Kindergarten in Tokyo) that are doing interesting things in early childhood education. The biggest impact that this book had on me and will impact my continued research is the inequality in play. The fact that minority, poor students do not have the same opportunities to play and the way that it impacts their development is substantial. How can I link play to peace and really focus on advocating for play through peace education? They go hand in hand. With all of the information out there about the positive impact of play on both social and academic development, it is baffling that more has not been done to further the inclusion of quality play in the education agenda.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten T

    Maybe I should give this a slightly lower review because of a few flaws- but I felt the subject too important. Although slightly different in topics, I felt this went perfectly with "Last Child in the Woods" because "Let the Children Play" had all the research-based studies the first book was missing. This made me rethink how I want to have my children schooled. I felt the studies were really important in showing how children thrive through play-and what does not help. A bit repetitive and the a Maybe I should give this a slightly lower review because of a few flaws- but I felt the subject too important. Although slightly different in topics, I felt this went perfectly with "Last Child in the Woods" because "Let the Children Play" had all the research-based studies the first book was missing. This made me rethink how I want to have my children schooled. I felt the studies were really important in showing how children thrive through play-and what does not help. A bit repetitive and the audio book had a slightly monotone reader. But good stuff.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Lucas

    Reading this book as a parent and as a person who works in education helped open my eyes to how much kids really do need more play time. Less time on technology. How by trying to protect our children we are really doing them a disservice. I immediately tried to get my children to play more. I wish I would have read it when my kids were younger. It does run a bit long and repetitive but I believe it is just to bring their point home. Studies on the subject of play are referred to over and over wh Reading this book as a parent and as a person who works in education helped open my eyes to how much kids really do need more play time. Less time on technology. How by trying to protect our children we are really doing them a disservice. I immediately tried to get my children to play more. I wish I would have read it when my kids were younger. It does run a bit long and repetitive but I believe it is just to bring their point home. Studies on the subject of play are referred to over and over which supports their ideas/point but for me made the flow of reading less enjoyable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dmitri Colebatch

    This book is terrible. If the writing is an indication of how the important discussion of play in our schools is handled, it is no surprise that our kids are deprived their recess play. I can summarize the book as: 1. Play is important 2. We say so 3. Here are lots and lots of other studies that say so What's missing is any useful narrative expanding on the studies, and any useful actions that people can take. This book is terrible. If the writing is an indication of how the important discussion of play in our schools is handled, it is no surprise that our kids are deprived their recess play. I can summarize the book as: 1. Play is important 2. We say so 3. Here are lots and lots of other studies that say so What's missing is any useful narrative expanding on the studies, and any useful actions that people can take.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yalman Onaran

    A forceful reminder that kids learn best while playing on their own, with friends and without parents’ intervention. We need to leave lots of unstructured, unscheduled time in their lives so they can grow to be problem solvers the world needs. Also a strong reminder about the damage standardized testing is causing children around the world.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I love the message, but the authors repeated the point with more and more data. Which made me realize that the larger point is: look at the over 400 pages of data showing the benefits of play - why are we ignoring it?! I want to send this book to every principal and superintendent in the country!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nisha

    They share great research and communicate the thesis clearly: kids need to play and we could transform schools through play. But the boom probably could have been half the length. Still, a very worthwhile read for any educator or parent!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    4.5 stars - I think this book is so important - for educators certainly, but also for anybody - play is so important and so often pushed aside, and this book highlights the benefits and the ways in which play is one of the best "educators" for a child to have. 4.5 stars - I think this book is so important - for educators certainly, but also for anybody - play is so important and so often pushed aside, and this book highlights the benefits and the ways in which play is one of the best "educators" for a child to have.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katy Emanuel

    This books has a great message, however there is a great deal of repetition of the same point throughout the book. This books is in great need of proper editing as there are a great number of grammatical errors throughout the book including improper word usage.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Very helpful in reminding me what I know is best for kids. I loved the research to help justify the shift I would like to make in my classroom to non - professionals.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    I can't give this book enough stars! It needs to be required reading for every parent, teacher, administrator & politician! I can't give this book enough stars! It needs to be required reading for every parent, teacher, administrator & politician!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    Not a riveting book, but a good reference source.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Corrie

    I felt the point could have been made just as well in fewer pages, but overall a very well-researched and compelling book on the importance of play.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hettie

    That's the last book from my long list of winter/spring reading, which I wanted to write about. This book is relatively new, and based on my interest in education, especially in American and Finnish secondary education. I should have been among the first people reading and reviewing it. Indeed, this book was in my to-read list for a while. However, after I finished the book, I was unsure how I felt about it, and I decided to let it sit for a while. Then the quarantine happened, and the topic of That's the last book from my long list of winter/spring reading, which I wanted to write about. This book is relatively new, and based on my interest in education, especially in American and Finnish secondary education. I should have been among the first people reading and reviewing it. Indeed, this book was in my to-read list for a while. However, after I finished the book, I was unsure how I felt about it, and I decided to let it sit for a while. Then the quarantine happened, and the topic of in-person education was too painful to address. But since I do not believe that our education is altered forever, I decided I will still write a review. There are many excellent observations in this book, and all the right things are said, but there were still things that bothered me. What I didn't like, was a description of an American school and American parents. It does not seem to resonate with my experience. Sure, parents like that exist :), but that's not an accurate picture of a typical American parent. One of the reasons could be that Sahlberg experienced an American school in a very academic environment. He was trying to place his child into pre-school close to Sanford, where, I guess, the school standards were aligned with very specific demands of parents in academia. Moreover, I have a suspicion that many of these parents themselves never attended at American school when they were small children, and that their expectations might have come from a different culture. I may be wrong with the above speculations, but I am sure - it's not like a school my kids went. From day one in school, I admired the way their teachers made the learning process fun. The kids didn't even know it was "education." Fro their point of view, they were playing, doing art projects, listening to their teacher reading books, doing puzzles, and then all of a sudden - "check whether your child can count to one-hundred." My second objection is that I can't entirely agree with the authors that "letting children play" will resolve all school problems. Especially towards the end of the book, that's how it sounds: just let them play, and everything will be fine. Although the authors cite some experiences in low-income communities, underfunded schools need funds. And schools in communities with a history of socioeconomic disparities need more help as well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I legit did not realize I read this book four years ago. Still good stuff, and still relevant. I asked in a couple of online educator forums if cutting recess was still "a thing" because I haven't heard much of it in the news. I heard back about recess being replaced in elementary school with walking laps and about teachers who keep kids in if it rains or is chilly at all. I heard a LOT about trying to cram before standardized testing and cutting recess or keeping kids in who aren't preforming w I legit did not realize I read this book four years ago. Still good stuff, and still relevant. I asked in a couple of online educator forums if cutting recess was still "a thing" because I haven't heard much of it in the news. I heard back about recess being replaced in elementary school with walking laps and about teachers who keep kids in if it rains or is chilly at all. I heard a LOT about trying to cram before standardized testing and cutting recess or keeping kids in who aren't preforming well. It is a thing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Well researched but very very very long.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Macalpine

    A good solid justification of the importance of play. Having heard him talk, it was the same ideas.. but good to explore them again.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paige

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber Snow

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  26. 5 out of 5

    Odeviz Soto

  27. 5 out of 5

    Douglass Donnell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anne Paul

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...