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Drinking the Rain: A Memoir

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A memoir of spiritualism and self-discovery from the acclaimed, award-winning author At fifty, Alix Kates Shulman, author of the celebrated feminist novel, Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen, left a city life dense with political activism, family and literary community, and went to live alone on an island off the coast of Maine. On a windswept beach, in a cabin with no plumbing, p A memoir of spiritualism and self-discovery from the acclaimed, award-winning author At fifty, Alix Kates Shulman, author of the celebrated feminist novel, Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen, left a city life dense with political activism, family and literary community, and went to live alone on an island off the coast of Maine. On a windswept beach, in a cabin with no plumbing, power, or telephone, she found that she was learning to live all over again. In this luminous, spirited book, she charts her subsequent path as she learned not simply the joys of meditative solitude, but to integrate her new awareness into a busy, committed, even hectic mainland life. “A ten-year voyage of discovery . . . Shulman's honesty and sense of inquiry carry us with her all the way--could even, if we were willing, change our lives.” —San Francisco Sunday Examiner & Chronicle


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A memoir of spiritualism and self-discovery from the acclaimed, award-winning author At fifty, Alix Kates Shulman, author of the celebrated feminist novel, Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen, left a city life dense with political activism, family and literary community, and went to live alone on an island off the coast of Maine. On a windswept beach, in a cabin with no plumbing, p A memoir of spiritualism and self-discovery from the acclaimed, award-winning author At fifty, Alix Kates Shulman, author of the celebrated feminist novel, Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen, left a city life dense with political activism, family and literary community, and went to live alone on an island off the coast of Maine. On a windswept beach, in a cabin with no plumbing, power, or telephone, she found that she was learning to live all over again. In this luminous, spirited book, she charts her subsequent path as she learned not simply the joys of meditative solitude, but to integrate her new awareness into a busy, committed, even hectic mainland life. “A ten-year voyage of discovery . . . Shulman's honesty and sense of inquiry carry us with her all the way--could even, if we were willing, change our lives.” —San Francisco Sunday Examiner & Chronicle

30 review for Drinking the Rain: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy Wilder

    When I read this book I was twenty years old and it had never occurred to me before but I realized it was quite true that I might live my whole life without ever being really on my own. That year I drove south to Mexico and north to Idaho and then back home from Arizona to Boston - all three trips on my own (and very much over my father's objections) - and I was keenly aware of everything I had been taught to fear about being a woman alone in a strange place. Almost nothing happened to me that y When I read this book I was twenty years old and it had never occurred to me before but I realized it was quite true that I might live my whole life without ever being really on my own. That year I drove south to Mexico and north to Idaho and then back home from Arizona to Boston - all three trips on my own (and very much over my father's objections) - and I was keenly aware of everything I had been taught to fear about being a woman alone in a strange place. Almost nothing happened to me that year that I had been warned about - most of my problems on the road were of my own creation (side note: never try to peel a grapefruit while driving on the interstate). But the fear that I carried around was monumental and facing it was both exhilarating and humbling. Alix Kates Shulman's memoir of living on a remote island by herself and meeting that fear head-on meant so much to me that I wrote her a letter (a physical one on paper, I believe) and she sent me back a card. I was floored. An inspiring and honest book and a gracious and generous author.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan Albert

    A tender, revealing memoir about a woman (a long-time feminist/pacifist activist) at mid-life, dealing with a divorce and a new lover and trying to find a place for herself in nature.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This book doesn't inspire the reader very much; it's mostly self serving and superficial. Only the last few pages had any thing worthwhile to offer. I had trouble getting through the endless food reports, what she ate, how she prepared it, where the food came from, and on and on. (Why do women authors do this? Sorry, Ladies, but it's true. So many women authors feel the need to write about what everyone is eating and who spent how much time in the kitchen. Male authors focus on action, I guess, This book doesn't inspire the reader very much; it's mostly self serving and superficial. Only the last few pages had any thing worthwhile to offer. I had trouble getting through the endless food reports, what she ate, how she prepared it, where the food came from, and on and on. (Why do women authors do this? Sorry, Ladies, but it's true. So many women authors feel the need to write about what everyone is eating and who spent how much time in the kitchen. Male authors focus on action, I guess, but women authors focus on food. Why? I'll bet I get some criticism for saying this.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Keeping with my current "back to basics" theme, in books, I am reading this. The woman of privilege heads to Maine to live in a cabin alone. And finds her food on the ground and in the water. Okay, so there are flaws. But it's a placeholder, for when my hold books come in. Why do they torture me and make me wait? It is detestable. Okay, so only the first third of this book is actually compelling. I enjoyed the writing about discovering that nature isn't so bad after all (I might be coming around Keeping with my current "back to basics" theme, in books, I am reading this. The woman of privilege heads to Maine to live in a cabin alone. And finds her food on the ground and in the water. Okay, so there are flaws. But it's a placeholder, for when my hold books come in. Why do they torture me and make me wait? It is detestable. Okay, so only the first third of this book is actually compelling. I enjoyed the writing about discovering that nature isn't so bad after all (I might be coming around) -- even thinking about getting a compost bin (don't tell anyone). But the rest, it was a chore, I found myself skipping chunks. She lost focus, and not in a delightful way.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    This is a beautiful coming-of-age (age 50, that is) memoir of a woman living on an inhabited Maine coastal island. Moving away from New York City for a while, Shulman learns to slow down, forage for mussels, and live life simply for a restorative spell.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sallee

    One of my favorite "coming of age, surviving divorce" books ever! One of my favorite "coming of age, surviving divorce" books ever!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cosmic Arcata

    Memorable. I especially like her wildcrafting her food on the island. She has a second book about her "husband". Did she really get a divorce or is this a second husband? Memorable. I especially like her wildcrafting her food on the island. She has a second book about her "husband". Did she really get a divorce or is this a second husband?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Solitude This teaches about solitude and finding what really matters. I was there on the island. I could see nubble. The author bright the string alive.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tejas Janet

    I struggled thru this book at times and came away with mixed feelings. The author has great ability with expository writing, but left me swimming at times thru too many repetitive details. However, it was still a really good book. The downside is that by book's end, I had tired of reading overly specific listings of wild foods harvested and descriptions of foods prepared. Editing towards this end, I think, would have raised this book from 4 to 5 stars for me. Detail is crucial in fine writing, b I struggled thru this book at times and came away with mixed feelings. The author has great ability with expository writing, but left me swimming at times thru too many repetitive details. However, it was still a really good book. The downside is that by book's end, I had tired of reading overly specific listings of wild foods harvested and descriptions of foods prepared. Editing towards this end, I think, would have raised this book from 4 to 5 stars for me. Detail is crucial in fine writing, but so is the ability to summarize and do without, and knowing when to do which is quite often what elevates the really good to the superb. Despite this criticism, I greatly admire this book, and enjoyed it very much. It resonated with me for many reasons. One being that I'm about the age she was when she embraced a life of isolation and simplicity (partial life - during warmer months primarily) on the coast of Maine. Secondly, I admire her pursuit of a simpler, solitary, more meditative life. Third, she is a skilled and interesting writer, though prone to including too many details as already noted. Fourthly, I appreciate her insights into her life and our life at large, especially with its many inconsistencies and comic/tragic complexities. Lots of good stuff here. Here are a few quotes I marked while reading that struck me as illustrative and significant (wish I'd marked more): "How can one live without rancor in a world steeped in suffering and injustice -- or live without contentment in a world bathed in birdsong at sundown?" "She (Sappho) is out to break records, I to establish mine by discovering how little I need in order to have everything, how much awaits me under the tide, how long I can stretch the season without freezing or cracking. My new rules are few and simple: follow my interest; go as deep as I can; change the rules whenever I like." "The very separation and compartmentalizing I escaped by coming to the nubble now reproduce themselves inside my garden as I reintroduce waste and trade my continuous harvest for rare, chancy joy." Note "the nubble" is how the author refers to her reclusive, island retreat. The name is a reference to the little island off Cape Neddick, called the Nubble. Various islands off the coast of Maine are similarly suited to being called the same, which is presumably how the name arose for her own island retreat. (I apologize if I missed where she explained this. I read this over about a 6 week period since I preferred to savor it and read it more slowly.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alli

    I have a pretty close connection to Long Island Maine and go there every summer. I know exactly the house she lived in and have stared at it from the beach below many an afternoon thinking two things: one, it had been abandoned and two who the hell would ever leave the most amazing and beautiful spot on earth or at least not spend every second of every summer there? My sister had told me about the writer that owned it- the story of her living in seclusion there and how she came to write "Drinki I have a pretty close connection to Long Island Maine and go there every summer. I know exactly the house she lived in and have stared at it from the beach below many an afternoon thinking two things: one, it had been abandoned and two who the hell would ever leave the most amazing and beautiful spot on earth or at least not spend every second of every summer there? My sister had told me about the writer that owned it- the story of her living in seclusion there and how she came to write "Drinking the Rain." This summer we both decided to read it, finally. I really liked it! And most of the time, I liked the author. She's quite a bit older than me and as a woman, at times I could not relate to the disappointments and dilemnas of that particular generation- a second wave feminist in repose and all of that....I did relate to (and admire) her sincere quest of self-discovery and her desire to change her life and make those changes on her own, internally. It was slow in places and she is quite philosophical in her reflections but all in all I found the pace do-able. Her quest for solitude was admirable too and something I could totally relate to. There's enough flashbacks to her life back in Manhattan and her life-long relationships interspersed with digging mussels, and steaming dandelion greens to keep the story moving. They allow for a sense of the whole person. Not just a long internal meditation on nature and one's relationship to it- alone.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan Braiden

    If I could only own one book, it would be this. Alix Kates Shulman helped me discover the art of long, slow conversations; the abundance in solitude; fearlessness and resilience in reinvention; and the gifts of the natural feast. I discovered this book at a time when, like the author, I was approaching 50, wrestling with the death of a marriage and a restless hunger to reinvent myself (or perhaps actually meet myself for the very first time). Reading it is like immersing in a love letter that yo If I could only own one book, it would be this. Alix Kates Shulman helped me discover the art of long, slow conversations; the abundance in solitude; fearlessness and resilience in reinvention; and the gifts of the natural feast. I discovered this book at a time when, like the author, I was approaching 50, wrestling with the death of a marriage and a restless hunger to reinvent myself (or perhaps actually meet myself for the very first time). Reading it is like immersing in a love letter that you would write to yourself a handful of years and "Aha!" moments after taking this in. It's brilliant comfort and an incantation to that courageous part of ourselves that secretly knows the wisdom of simple pleasures, and of our own company. I read it again and again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    While the world was on an Eat, Pray, Love craze I found this gem of a memoir in a small bookstore on Cape Cod. I have since lent it out to some of my favorite people and almost everyone has loved it. Although the author seems a bit self serving at times, and that can be a huge turn off, her story is fascinating and brave-and quite funny at times. This is a book that proves the power of overcoming your fears and flaws and learning to live again mid-life. While the world was on an Eat, Pray, Love craze I found this gem of a memoir in a small bookstore on Cape Cod. I have since lent it out to some of my favorite people and almost everyone has loved it. Although the author seems a bit self serving at times, and that can be a huge turn off, her story is fascinating and brave-and quite funny at times. This is a book that proves the power of overcoming your fears and flaws and learning to live again mid-life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cath Van

    Easily one of this years favourites. I started out at only two pages a day as I wanted to enjoy the book as long as possible, yet soon squeezed in a few more pages every day. I liked the way the story built from experiencing the island and how to live on less and in solitude, to connecting those experiences to mainlandlife and it's noise and distraction, and in the third section to the world with it's waste and pollution, making it into a book in which all Shulman's feminist issues of years gone Easily one of this years favourites. I started out at only two pages a day as I wanted to enjoy the book as long as possible, yet soon squeezed in a few more pages every day. I liked the way the story built from experiencing the island and how to live on less and in solitude, to connecting those experiences to mainlandlife and it's noise and distraction, and in the third section to the world with it's waste and pollution, making it into a book in which all Shulman's feminist issues of years gone by are interconnected.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer P

    A little dated, but a lovely exploration of solitude in nature.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    I read this book soon after it came out in 1995. I loved it then, but I appreciate it even more on this second reading. Beautifully written, almost poetry, it recounts the author's time seeking solitude and a better connection with her self on an island off the coast of Maine as she turns fifty. She lived for part of each year following, in an undeveloped cabin, securing most of her food from the surrounding earth and sea, discovering the abundance of nature in the mostly overlooked plants surro I read this book soon after it came out in 1995. I loved it then, but I appreciate it even more on this second reading. Beautifully written, almost poetry, it recounts the author's time seeking solitude and a better connection with her self on an island off the coast of Maine as she turns fifty. She lived for part of each year following, in an undeveloped cabin, securing most of her food from the surrounding earth and sea, discovering the abundance of nature in the mostly overlooked plants surrounding her home and from which she concocted delicious meals. But the book moves beyond that island to her life in New York City as an activist for women's rights and writer, a woman in a marriage that has died, a mother of two grown children who don't entirely approve of this new phase in their mother's life. And it takes her to Boulder, Colorado, where she spends two years teaching at the university and writing, while also exploring a terrain new to her ... the mountains and forests. She also engages in a protest of the nuclear weapons at Los Alamos. And always back again to the island nubble ... after ten years very much changed since her initial trips. In addition to being a fine writer, Alxx Kates Shulman is a wisdom woman, extracting the rich marrow from her experiences, reflecting, and offering it up for others to partake at the table she sets. It's a feast. Along the way we meet Margaret, ten years older than Alix, and also a wisdom woman, and Charles, Alix's found again lover ... both richly steeped in life on their own terms. But what made this book especially poignant for me at this particular time is Shulman's reflections on climate change, on the destruction of the Amazon rain forest through fires set by farmers clearing land, on the accident at Chernobyl, on the pollution of the seas and the killing of sea life, and on the use of pesticides. It's been over twenty years since Shulman wrote this book, and the world today is in worse shape that it was then ... because people don't listen and too many of us put short term profit ahead of everything else. This book is even more timely now than when it was written, and for those wanting to consider another way of being on the earth, living more gently and more intentionally, it is a wonderful guide, without setting out to be that. This book should become a classic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I didn't particularly enjoy this memoir because of her style of writing, a bit fluffy and pompous, but I can appreciate her spiritual trip in life to find herself, to find answers and solidity in what she actually believes and truly wants out of her life. She's very lucky to have been supported by her now ex-husband to go off on her own, and leaving the kids behind, to different remote places over the years for the self-feeding of her inner soul, and especially for going off alone summers at a t I didn't particularly enjoy this memoir because of her style of writing, a bit fluffy and pompous, but I can appreciate her spiritual trip in life to find herself, to find answers and solidity in what she actually believes and truly wants out of her life. She's very lucky to have been supported by her now ex-husband to go off on her own, and leaving the kids behind, to different remote places over the years for the self-feeding of her inner soul, and especially for going off alone summers at a time to their little shack on a small remote island off the coast of Maine. Here she tested herself in living naturally and in oneness with nature by doing her very best to eat only what the earth provided in the way of weeds and berries for salads, and herbs growing around the cabin for seasoning, and mussels, crabs and clams for her food source. I love that she had great books on identifying wild weeds for her specific area on food sources that she could read and learn more about as the days passed. But, she ended up divorced and mentally wondered about her sanity. Admitting to being a feminist activist, I believe she had her priorities all wrong in life. She was fighting for all the wrong things. But, I don't think she put the two together. Only time alone on this island where she could think and live freely, was she finally able to separate the GARBAGE she had been indocrinated into from the real, God-given life she was meant to live. Now, this is only my opinion because I don't believe she actually saw how much happier she was to clear her mind of such self-absorbing thoughts while alone on the island. Her attentions turned from self-centered and impowering herself as a woman to protecting nature and the foods we eat. She sets the best example that she can, never perfect. She sees how we humans are destroying this earth. So do I. But, since you can't control the whole world, you adapt to the changing times and you just do your best to leave a smaller footprint.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Powell

    The words Alix Shulman strings across a page voice a suspension of judgment by a mind, conditioned like mine, to ignore and dismiss wonders of the world outside it. The book, taken as a whole, is very funny. I can't remember laughing so happily uncontrolledly , actually slapping my knee, since James Thurber. Anyone who buys the book on the basis of that recommendation will feel duped . . . for a while. It hadn't occurred to me for quite a spell, that Shulman had a sense of humor at all. The whol The words Alix Shulman strings across a page voice a suspension of judgment by a mind, conditioned like mine, to ignore and dismiss wonders of the world outside it. The book, taken as a whole, is very funny. I can't remember laughing so happily uncontrolledly , actually slapping my knee, since James Thurber. Anyone who buys the book on the basis of that recommendation will feel duped . . . for a while. It hadn't occurred to me for quite a spell, that Shulman had a sense of humor at all. The whole first part, before I started laughing, is wonderful in its own right. She shared minute discoveries. I was awed. I came to the computer to share this gem of a read after laughing so heartily. I'm dying to hint where and what she described so perfectly for my funny bone. Other reviewers have revealed the charm of a New Yorker meditating on a pool of blue mussels. Better, for me, than descriptions of sea shells by the novelist whose work forced the Senate to investigate migrant housing. I don't remember laughing while reading the Sea of Cortez or the Grapes of Wrath. But I'm not going to spoil it for you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    4.5 stars. I read this over the course of almost a month, mostly because it begs to be read slowly, in the same way that Shulman lived on her island retreat — carefully and methodically learning what was edible and how to prepare it and spending large parts of each day collecting, preparing, and eating that day's meals. At times the detail was a little too much, but on the whole I really appreciated her reflections. After a long period of feminist activism, she wrestles with whether living off t 4.5 stars. I read this over the course of almost a month, mostly because it begs to be read slowly, in the same way that Shulman lived on her island retreat — carefully and methodically learning what was edible and how to prepare it and spending large parts of each day collecting, preparing, and eating that day's meals. At times the detail was a little too much, but on the whole I really appreciated her reflections. After a long period of feminist activism, she wrestles with whether living off the land in isolation is embracing her values or running away from the fight. She watches in real-time as the relationship becomes evident between the destructiveness and pollution of human beings — even those she's gone a far distance from — and the animals and plant life she depends on. She wonders whether finding a lover means she's sacrificed the independence she gained or whether her time alone has better prepared her to be in relationship with others. It may not be the book for everyone, but for me — feminist, parent, newly divorced — it was an excellent read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauri

    I have mixed feelings about this book. I found it at a Little Free Library, and I loved the premise: a 50-year-old woman leaves her comfortable life in NYC to spend the summer in a small, remote Maine cabin with no running water, ostensibly to write. What really happens is that she embarks on a journey of self-discovery, learning that she's far stronger and more capable than she ever imagined. An early feminist, she finds that she actually enjoys tasks of domesticity. Good so far, right?! But th I have mixed feelings about this book. I found it at a Little Free Library, and I loved the premise: a 50-year-old woman leaves her comfortable life in NYC to spend the summer in a small, remote Maine cabin with no running water, ostensibly to write. What really happens is that she embarks on a journey of self-discovery, learning that she's far stronger and more capable than she ever imagined. An early feminist, she finds that she actually enjoys tasks of domesticity. Good so far, right?! But then. Then the book starts to turn; the author seems to become more self-centered, and the pace really slows down. She gets divorced and manages to keep the cabin, while losing some of her relationships. It's still well-written and interesting, but I wouldn't rave about it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    The author, a lifelong feminist, has written a memoir of her 50th summer, spent alone on an island off the coast of Maine, learning to enjoy the moment and living with the natural world. She explores James Baldwin’s paradox, “to hold in the mind two ideas which seemed to be in opposition. The first..acceptance without rancor, of life as it is and men as they are…the second…that one must never in one’s own life accept injustices as commonplace but must fight them with all one’s strength.” On this The author, a lifelong feminist, has written a memoir of her 50th summer, spent alone on an island off the coast of Maine, learning to enjoy the moment and living with the natural world. She explores James Baldwin’s paradox, “to hold in the mind two ideas which seemed to be in opposition. The first..acceptance without rancor, of life as it is and men as they are…the second…that one must never in one’s own life accept injustices as commonplace but must fight them with all one’s strength.” On this island, back in NYC and in her travels to Boulder, Colorado and Ukraine she writes of acceptance and struggle. She learns to love herself and the world, with hope without regrets, wherever she is, in that moment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Read this years ago when I was too young to appreciate it, but now, approaching fifty, I found it on my bookshelf and immediately wanted to re-read it. The author writes about spending summers alone on a remote island in Maine, finding herself at the age of fifty in simple pleasures like foraging and cooking wild foods, reading, and writing. During the rest of the year she continues to write and teach as a visiting professor in places like Colorado and Hawaii. I am so drawn to the idea that we c Read this years ago when I was too young to appreciate it, but now, approaching fifty, I found it on my bookshelf and immediately wanted to re-read it. The author writes about spending summers alone on a remote island in Maine, finding herself at the age of fifty in simple pleasures like foraging and cooking wild foods, reading, and writing. During the rest of the year she continues to write and teach as a visiting professor in places like Colorado and Hawaii. I am so drawn to the idea that we can reinvent ourselves and I enjoy reading about the different ways that people do this.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Barbara von der Osten

    This is memoir extraordinaire. A woman finds her independence, and realizes she is a solitaire after spending a summer in a cabin on an island off the coast of Portland, Maine. She learns to eat what is grown naturally on the island, and catch the crabs and mussels that are abundant there. I don’t think I can say enough good things about the content, tone, or structure of this book. I will definitely keep it and read again someday.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    Really charming memoir of a NYC girl who finds herself on her yearly pilmagrages to an island in Maine. I loved the descriptions of how she forages the coastline to eat every spring and summer. What really hooked me was when, in the midst of a divorce a long time coming, she gets offered a residency in Boulder. Her housing offer is the Chautauqua cabins I had just seen at the base of the Flatirons a few weeks ago.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Kittel

    Like many others here, I loved the first part of this book but found that it fell off after that. Loved the idyllic setting. What woman of a certain age doesn't dream of such a thing? Calgon, take me away. Still thinking about the author's exhortation to find time for long thoughts, however. I often use my one long lap of swimming in the ocean for just such a thing, but sometimes even that isn't long enough to find clarity. Still, it's a start... Like many others here, I loved the first part of this book but found that it fell off after that. Loved the idyllic setting. What woman of a certain age doesn't dream of such a thing? Calgon, take me away. Still thinking about the author's exhortation to find time for long thoughts, however. I often use my one long lap of swimming in the ocean for just such a thing, but sometimes even that isn't long enough to find clarity. Still, it's a start...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    *** 1/2. I expected to feel a greater connection to this book, being the age now she was then, sharing some of the same sensibilities, living a short boat ride away from her Maine island home. But she kept one thin, slightly prickly layer between us, and left me only picking up tender bits here and there instead.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    Beautiful. Marriage, divorce, children, feeling the constant pressure of what we “should” be doing, embracing simplicity, and creating new relationships when we think we couldn’t possibly have the time or room. A single life with a million paths - recommend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alora

    I found this book in a Free Little Library. Part 1 of this book was excellent. She was truly telling a good story. Parts 2 and 3 were not; they were repetitive, long-winded, and contained too much dull detail.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marty

    Abandoned after part one. I just couldn't read the word nubble one more time. Or endure the preachiness "I find every meal I prepare for myself an opportunity." Sadly, her lessons won't be my lessons. Abandoned after part one. I just couldn't read the word nubble one more time. Or endure the preachiness "I find every meal I prepare for myself an opportunity." Sadly, her lessons won't be my lessons.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Small

    I loved the simplicity the author sought and described so beautifully.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Suzette Neuenhaus

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A woman's memoir of how she went 'back to nature' after her divorce. A woman's memoir of how she went 'back to nature' after her divorce.

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