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The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine

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OB/GYN, writer for The New York Times, USA Today, and Self, and host of the show Jensplaining, Dr. Jen Gunter now delivers the definitive book on vaginal health, answering the questions you've always had but were afraid to ask--or couldn't find the right answers to. She has been called Twitter's resident gynecologist, the Internet's OB/GYN, and one of the fiercest advocate OB/GYN, writer for The New York Times, USA Today, and Self, and host of the show Jensplaining, Dr. Jen Gunter now delivers the definitive book on vaginal health, answering the questions you've always had but were afraid to ask--or couldn't find the right answers to. She has been called Twitter's resident gynecologist, the Internet's OB/GYN, and one of the fiercest advocates for women's health...and she's here to give you the straight talk on the topics she knows best. Does eating sugar cause yeast infections? Does pubic hair have a function? Should you have a vulvovaginal care regimen? Will your vagina shrivel up if you go without sex? What's the truth about the HPV vaccine? So many important questions, so much convincing, confusing, contradictory misinformation! In this age of click bait, pseudoscience, and celebrity-endorsed products, it's easy to be overwhelmed--whether it's websites, advice from well-meaning friends, uneducated partners, and even healthcare providers. So how do you separate facts from fiction? OB-GYN Jen Gunter, an expert on women's health--and the internet's most popular go-to doc--comes to the rescue with a book that debunks the myths and educates and empowers women. From reproductive health to the impact of antibiotics and probiotics, and the latest trends, including vaginal steaming, vaginal marijuana products, and jade eggs, Gunter takes us on a factual, fun-filled journey. Discover the truth about: - The vaginal microbiome - Genital hygiene, lubricants, and hormone myths and fallacies - How diet impacts vaginal health - Stem cells and the vagina - Cosmetic vaginal surgery - What changes to expect during pregnancy, after childbirth, and through menopause - How medicine fails women by dismissing symptoms Plus: - Thongs vs. lace: the best underwear for vaginal health - How to select a tampon - The full glory of the clitoris and the myth of the G Spot ... And so much more. Whether you're a twenty-six-year-old worried that her labia are "uncool" or a sixty-six-year-old dealing with painful sex, this comprehensive guide is sure to become a lifelong trusted resource.


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OB/GYN, writer for The New York Times, USA Today, and Self, and host of the show Jensplaining, Dr. Jen Gunter now delivers the definitive book on vaginal health, answering the questions you've always had but were afraid to ask--or couldn't find the right answers to. She has been called Twitter's resident gynecologist, the Internet's OB/GYN, and one of the fiercest advocate OB/GYN, writer for The New York Times, USA Today, and Self, and host of the show Jensplaining, Dr. Jen Gunter now delivers the definitive book on vaginal health, answering the questions you've always had but were afraid to ask--or couldn't find the right answers to. She has been called Twitter's resident gynecologist, the Internet's OB/GYN, and one of the fiercest advocates for women's health...and she's here to give you the straight talk on the topics she knows best. Does eating sugar cause yeast infections? Does pubic hair have a function? Should you have a vulvovaginal care regimen? Will your vagina shrivel up if you go without sex? What's the truth about the HPV vaccine? So many important questions, so much convincing, confusing, contradictory misinformation! In this age of click bait, pseudoscience, and celebrity-endorsed products, it's easy to be overwhelmed--whether it's websites, advice from well-meaning friends, uneducated partners, and even healthcare providers. So how do you separate facts from fiction? OB-GYN Jen Gunter, an expert on women's health--and the internet's most popular go-to doc--comes to the rescue with a book that debunks the myths and educates and empowers women. From reproductive health to the impact of antibiotics and probiotics, and the latest trends, including vaginal steaming, vaginal marijuana products, and jade eggs, Gunter takes us on a factual, fun-filled journey. Discover the truth about: - The vaginal microbiome - Genital hygiene, lubricants, and hormone myths and fallacies - How diet impacts vaginal health - Stem cells and the vagina - Cosmetic vaginal surgery - What changes to expect during pregnancy, after childbirth, and through menopause - How medicine fails women by dismissing symptoms Plus: - Thongs vs. lace: the best underwear for vaginal health - How to select a tampon - The full glory of the clitoris and the myth of the G Spot ... And so much more. Whether you're a twenty-six-year-old worried that her labia are "uncool" or a sixty-six-year-old dealing with painful sex, this comprehensive guide is sure to become a lifelong trusted resource.

30 review for The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina—Separating the Myth from the Medicine

  1. 5 out of 5

    MonumentToDecency

    It is best to avoid blowing air into the vagina I'm just going to leave that there, completely out of context, and let you deal with figuring it out all on your own. It grinds my gears to no end hearing that rubbish that menstruation is something women should be proud of; a reminder of our femininity; a reminder of our beautiful womanhood; a reminder of our fragility, or of our ability to create life, yadda yadda. Shut the heck up. For many women, periods are painful, and unnecessary 90% of the It is best to avoid blowing air into the vagina I'm just going to leave that there, completely out of context, and let you deal with figuring it out all on your own. It grinds my gears to no end hearing that rubbish that menstruation is something women should be proud of; a reminder of our femininity; a reminder of our beautiful womanhood; a reminder of our fragility, or of our ability to create life, yadda yadda. Shut the heck up. For many women, periods are painful, and unnecessary 90% of the time (pretty much unless you’re then and there wanting to get babyfied). Why can we not just turn them on and off p.r.n. I get migraines from hell with mine. Three days of incapacitation plus an extra day of migraine hangover, every fucking month. Admittedly after 20 years of migraines I finally got a diagnosis - beyond the “oh, just take some paracetamol that should clear your headache right up” - so I now take medication. It still puts me out for 3-4 days but at least now my head doesn’t feel like it’s bleeding into my neck and out of my ears for a week. Coupled with useless evacuation of blood, debilitating cramps, nausea, diarrhoea, intense muscle and joint pain, vulva pain, back pain like the spine is slipping through the tailbone, it’s not really a reminder of anything except feeling like a Beast of Hell. Now that I’ve got that out of my system. Let’s go…. The Vagina Bible brilliantly analyses how all bearers of vaginas have been trashed by a medical system steeped in patriarchal bias. Throughout the book I kept thinking of all the times I’ve heard ‘womens worries’ dismissed as ‘just women stuff’ as though it doesn’t really count as a medical thing. “Oh, you’ve got debilitating pain every month and you can’t stop vomiting? It’s just a women's thing.” No, sorry, that’s a medical problem and it’s not normal. You could say I got really pissed off reading this but I was also really heartened that doctors, at least this one, are starting to take ‘women's worries’ seriously. The vagina is a fibromuscular tube that connects the vulva with the cervix. I realize this is the least sexy way to describe something that brings so much pleasure. Personally, I’d love to use a different term, as vagina means “sheath” in Latin, and I hate having female anatomy defined in terms of how it fits with a penis. Medically, the vagina starts at the hymen, so just inside the vestibule. Two interesting things in that quote. Firstly, it points out how women's bodies are traditionally defined by and reduced to their opposition to the male body. The vagina is nothing but a holder for a piece of a man; a piece popularly used to define virility and manhood, a measure of a man's worth but not of ours. Our worth is only subject to his, and ours apparently cannot be measured without his. Secondly, hymen is named for Hymenaeus, the Greek god of marriage. So, our virtue, our marriageability, our bodies, and our worth are inextricably linked to some allegedly intrinsic value applied by men (and for their benefit). To break that down, our body parts are so named that we are a mans sheath but not worthy of being his sheath unless we are marriageable. Our marriageability is first found between our legs. You can see why reading this gave me the shits. I’m not a lesbian for a reason. But if I was, this would probably be my reason. Righto. Next.It is not surprising to me when I hear of women who fake orgasms with male partners. After all, they have been led to believe that a female orgasm should be reached with a penis by way of an imaginary spot.There’s an actual sub-chapter about the G-Spot, named for its ‘discoverer’ Ernst Gräfenberg, yeah a dude. Do people still believe in this? The vagina is a magical place. It does amazing things. It doesn’t need fancyfying. It literally could not get any fancier if it tried. Why some man had to dress it up to make it more appealing makes me think the fault lies with him rather than the millions of women who still look for this non-existent thing and feel faulty when they can’t find the damned thing. The whole vagina is your g-spot. I think Gräfenberg was just looking for some way to excuse the fact he couldn’t satisfy his partner. Really, if you’re getting a kick out of that spot, there’s nothing there but the urethra and maybe part of the back of the clitoris. While we’re in this region, The Vagina Bible cleared up what I long suspected about female ejaculation: it’s just piddle. Ok, let’s get on with the fun stuff. The Vagina Bible is full of wonderful nuggets of reputable information. Everything is laid out clearly. The whole thing is constructed so that you can read it in one fell swoop or use it as a reference book. And you could use it as a reference book. It goes through pretty much anything that can upset a vagina from cervical cancer to menopause to weird itches to blood coming from heck knows where. This actually useful Bible covers everything. There’s STI’s and how to catch them, how to shave and/or trim properly (yep, we've all been doing it wrong), how to wipe your butt properly (we're doing that wrong too), is that a yeast infection? is that a UTI? (probably no to both questions), wipes for your bits, douching, moisturising, ‘freshening’ products, odor eliminating products, soaps, placing garlic inside your vagina (omfg, what?!?), rocks for your vagina (WHAT!), and everything else. Oh, and yoghurt. Stop putting yoghurt in your vagina. It’s not the right kind of bacteria. Each chapter ends with the BOTTOM LINE. A short bullet point summary of the chapters salient points and, god, it’s so valuable. It’s like a revision sheet and an index (but there’s a proper ‘contents’ in the front.) To be honest, the only thing The Vagina Bible left out was why my grandmother, a nursing sister for 26 years, insists on putting talcum powder in her underwear. The vagina is supposed to be moist, it’s supposed to be humid, and it’s supposed to leak a bit. I can’t imagine how horrible and unhygienic it would be to have all that scungy talc floating against my vulva all day. Yeeeuck. NO! Things I learnt that really surprised me, some of which seem really obvious now that I know: •The World Health Organization (WHO) has guidelines for water-based lubricants. •There is such a thing as icing that comes in a can •There is no medical reason to wear or not wear underwear •People put cranberry juice in their vagina (Ok, so on review it doesn't actually say this. It says people drink it to have some kind of effect on their bladder. I was tired - leave me alone. So, I'm swapping this one out with...) •People use hairdryers on their vagina. What? Just dry it with a towel. It's a vagina not a sponge. •People put rocks in their vagina. ROCKS! Some of the sorts of things you can expect to read about in The Vagina Bible (I’m doing my best here to reel you in because this book is fantastic)(my additions in italics): •Vaginal steaming. This is supposed to clean out your 'disgusting uterus', as if steam could even make it that far. Just no. Leave it alone. If you do this, your vagina is literally smarter than you. Listen to it, it doesn't want that shit done to it. •Homeopathy. No study has proven homeopathy works, and the very idea is not compatible with the laws of physics. If a product is as effective as a company claims—and in medicine, an 80 percent success rate is truly amazing—then why don’t you prove it? •77 percent of women aged 18–25 said they washed inside their vagina because that was what their partner wanted. No! That's your vagina. If they don't like it they're free to find another receptacle for their foul ideas. •Should I Use Boric Acid Weekly to Help My Vaginal pH? No! •It is not possible for the vulva to be sterile, and the vagina is full of bacteria. The only way you could make things worse bacteria-wise is if you rinsed your underwear in raw sewage. You could wear the same underwear every day for a week, and while they might smell a little ripe from body odor and be a little crusty with discharge, they won’t cause an infection. •The vulva and vagina don’t have lungs. The vagina doesn’t like oxygen, or even air. They don't need to breathe. But also:There is no medical reason to wear or not wear underwear. •Under the microscope, moisturizers do not dramatically improve the appearance of tissues. I.e., don’t waste your money. Your vulva can look after itself. Don't put that shit inside you unless you want to know what a screaming vagina sounds like. Alrighty. You want some stories? I know you do. Getting the Chop: I knew (not in the biblical sense) a woman who had labiaplasty. She was very proud of her now perfect vagina. She invited me to coffee once, not so much for coffee. I skipped out because I really didn't want to see this magical perfect vagina. It was all a bit weird, "hey, come see my fabulous perfect vagina". Erm, no thanks, I can look at my own. Anyway, she regaled me with tales of her moisturising regimen. Said she was keeping the skin as youthful, fresh, tight, and compact as it was when she was a teenager. So, it's interesting to read that moisturiser will really only keep you moist. But that’s pointless for many of us because moistness is what vaginas do best. Ok, second best.I have read about plastic surgeons who do labiaplasty so women can look “sleeker in so-called athleisure wear.” I know some people call this look “camel toe,” but I prefer “labial cleavage,” and the answer is not surgery—it is better-fitting athletic wear. I’ve stared at more male butt cracks (gluteal clefts) than I care to remember, whether it was just some guy bending over or gravity-defying pants that appear to hover like magic just above the anus without a belt. What I never hear is that men should seek out plastic surgeons to get their gluteal clefts sewn shut. I also can’t imagine a similar industry for men that profits from surgically trimming penises so they look better in tight jeans. Pane Di Casa: The Vagina Bible talks about all those yeast infection (self-)diagnoses. And how most of those diagnoses were wrong. “Many women are plagued for years with a seemingly untreatable yeast infection, when they really are suffering from something else.” Every woman I've ever been with has been convinced she has a yeast infection. They’ve all spent a small fortune on creams and treatments only to be disappointed that their yeast infection hasn't cleared up or surprised when it miraculously cleared up about an hour after treatment. That's because it ain't yeast, hon'. I was young then and didn’t know how to reassure them. But I’m old now and know this: Having a humid vulva is normal. Having an itch every now and then is normal. And, for fucks sake, some discharge is normal. Also: “A woman claimed to have made bread with a sourdough starter she nourished with her vaginal yeast.” Sorry, what? Wait. Let me fetch my glasses. *fetches glasses* OK, nope. It does say that. While the penis is, more often than not, a symbol of power and control or some such rubbish, vaginas and, consequently their owners, are subjected to a whole lot of marketing gimmicks, pseudoscience, and shitty medicine dedicated to making us feel dirty, embarrassed, and ashamed of what’s between our legs. From being told we should use ‘feminine hygiene wipes’ (where are the ‘masculine hygiene wipes’ for dirty penii?), to the refusal to show anything but blue liquid in advertising for menstrual products, to the common near inability to say the word vagina or vulva, to lysol and all the 'modern' products flogging the same ancient ‘vaginas are yucky’ bullshit, to vaginal rejuvenation and labiaplasty (which the author likens to being told to have a penis reduction to make your dipstick more pretty), the anti-vagina shaming is endless. As the author says, “there’s a lot of money in vaginal shame” and when you start thinking something is off about your muff remember “It’s a vagina, not a piña colada.” You don’t need to be cleaning it out, freshening it up, washing it down, getting the movers in because “Your vagina is a self-cleaning oven.” Rinse it off, it can handle the rest. And for anything it can’t handle there’s vaginal mastercard diazepam. Maybe. Your vagina is fine. It smells great. It looks great. It's as tight, loose, floppy, taut, flabby, snug, fluffy, smooth, bumpy, moist, humid, damp or wet as it wants to be. And unless something physically changes, there's no need for you to change it. And, finally, I leave you with these words of wisdom: Please don’t put parsley in your vagina. My Rating: 8 out of 10 women out of 5

  2. 4 out of 5

    NAT.orious reads ☾

    5 ★★★★★ for Jen's vagenda The patriarchy and snake oil have had a good run, but I'm done with how they negatively affect and weaponize women's health. So I am not going to stop swinging my bat until everyone has the tools to be an empowered patient and those who seek to subjugate women by keeping them from facts about their bodies have shut up and taken a seat in the back of class. That's my vagenda. This book is for you if…you carry a vagina and vulva or don't carry one but want to educate 5 ★★★★★ for Jen's vagenda The patriarchy and snake oil have had a good run, but I'm done with how they negatively affect and weaponize women's health. So I am not going to stop swinging my bat until everyone has the tools to be an empowered patient and those who seek to subjugate women by keeping them from facts about their bodies have shut up and taken a seat in the back of class. That's my vagenda. This book is for you if…you carry a vagina and vulva or don't carry one but want to educate yourself on them. Period. ⇝Preface. What. a. book. I love it so much. My goodness, I really do!! I am 100% honest when I say that I will get this book for all my vagina carrying friends AND myself. This is definitely one of my most significant reads. Jen's book is: ⇝eye-opening ⇝empowering ⇝sobering ⇝based on facts and decent studies ⇝feminist ⇝fantastic ⇝and so many more adjectives. Just buy it!! It goes without saying that giving a summary of such a fantastic scientific book is impossible. Jen's writing style is clear and straight forward. She has a very honest and down to earth way of communicating facts and her experience as a gyn. She makes away with many ridiculous claims and practices that both society and science perpetuated but are actually crap. She also very clearly explains how patriarchy is still ruling a place where men have nothing to say (the vulva and vagina). Not only is this a very feminist read it is also addressing inequalities in access to health due to racist systems and frequently underlines the fact that being a woman is not only about having a vagina Here's what to expect: I've marked what I found particularly useful with a moon: GETTING STARTED 1 The Vulva 🌑 2 The Vagina 🌑 3 Vaginas and Vulvas in Transition 🌑 4 Female Pleasure and Sex Ed 🌑 5 Pregnancy and Childbirth EVERYDAY PRACTICALITIES AND V MAINTENANCE 6 Medical Maintenance 🌑 7 Food and Vaginal Health 🌑 8 The Bottom Line on Underwear 9 The Lowdown on Lube 10 Kegel Exercises 🌑 SKIN CARE AND CLEANSING 11 Vulvar Cleansing: Soaps, Cleansers, and Wipes 🌑 12 Vaginal Cleansing: Douches, Steams, Sprays, and Potpourri 🌑 13 Hair Removal and Grooming 🌑 14 Moisturizers, Barriers, and Bath Products 🌑 MENSTRUAL PRODUCTS AND MYTHOLOGY 15 The Truth About Toxic Shock Syndrome 🌑 16 Are There Toxins in Tampons and Pads? 17 Menstrual Hygiene 🌑 MENOPAUSE 18 Menopause 19 Treating GSM MEDICATIONS AND INTERVENTIONS 20 Cannabis 21 Contraception 🌑 22 Antibiotics and Probiotics 23 Cosmetic Procedures, Injections and "Rejuvenation" 🌑 SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS 24 General STI Information 🌑 25 STI Prevention 🌑 26 The Human Papilloma Virus 27 Herpes 28 Gonorrhea and Chlamydia 29 Trichomoniasis 30 Pubic Lice 🌑 CONDITIONS 31 Yeast 32 Bacterial Vaginosis 33 Vulvodynia 34 Pelvic Floor Muscle Spasm and Vaginismus 35 Skin Conditions 36 UTIs and Bladder Pain Syndrome 🌑 37 Pelvic Organ Prolapse SYMPTOMS 38 Communicating with Your Provider 🌑🌑🌑🌑🌑 39 I Have Pain with Sex 40 I Have Vaginitis 41 I Hav a Vulvar Itch 42 I Have Vulvar Pain 43 I Have an Odor 44 I Have Bleeding After Sex PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER 45 Medicine Cabinet Rehab 🌑 46 Internet Hygiene and Apps 47 Journal of Old Wives' Tales 🌑 REFERENCES ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Some aspects I highlighted throughout the book, with Jen's facts + opinions in cursive, many of them with a feminist vagenda: The unclean vagina: Obsession with reproductive tract purity and cleansing date back to a time when a woman's worth was measured by her virginity and how many children she might bear. A vagina and uterus were currency. Playing on these fears awakens something visceral. AND It is important to remember that the concept of female cleanliness has largely been driven by a male-dominated society that for centuries, if not longer, has decided normal female genitals and secretions are "dirty". the mighty penis: A penis is not the most reliable way to achieve female orgasm. AND The idea that a penis is mighty enough to bring on labor is, to be honest, a bit eye-rolling. AND Everyone (okay, the patriarchy) seems very impressed with the ability of a penis to grow, but the few centimetres of change that a penis can muster up pales in comparison with the vagina's ability to stretch. the unimportant clitoris: Males of the time were unsure of the role of the clitoris and likely thought it unimportant. This stands in sharp contrast to the anatomic glory of the penis. [...] Society, including, medicine, is obsessed with erections, while the clitoris barely registers as a footnote. "accidental" anal sex: Some women report coercion regarding anal sex, as well as so-called "accidental" but actually planned anal penetration by their male partners. [As someone who has had anal sex I cannot for the life of me understand how men can be asshole-y enough to do shit like this. Every single person who does this should be tied up and then be penetrated anally without lube. See how accidental it feels.] A tip from Jen about all this "cleansing, cleaning, etc." products: The way some of these products are promoted makes it sound as if it is a miracle the vulva has made it this far. The culture of chastising women for sex - which has been around ever since: The increased friction from dry tissues and/or the obvious discomfort of their partner was apparently a turn- on for men. I have often wondered if normalizing a practice that made sex painful for women was an invisible chastity belt. AND I hear from women that some male partners "don't like" lubricant or say it affects their erection. It's only a few millilitres of lube (far less than an ounce), so it's not exactly as if his penis is encased in pudding. [...] If he uses this "too wet" excuse, then either he doesn't know what an excited vagina feels like or he could be projecting his medical condition, typically erectile dysfunction, onto you. _____________________ This eArc was provided by Kensington Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you very much!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I hadn't planned to read this book until I read my GR friend MonumentToDecency's review of it.  As I cannot possibly write a better and more entertaining endorsement for this book, I urge you to hop over to her review and read it for yourself.  Prepare to laugh and learn! Click here to be taken to this most informative and hilarious review. You too will want to read the book!  And if you have a vagina, you should! I hadn't planned to read this book until I read my GR friend MonumentToDecency's review of it.  As I cannot possibly write a better and more entertaining endorsement for this book, I urge you to hop over to her review and read it for yourself.  Prepare to laugh and learn! Click here to be taken to this most informative and hilarious review. You too will want to read the book!  And if you have a vagina, you should!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    I follow this author on Twitter and she's really funny and amazing, and I love how she sticks it to male trolls and idiots perpetuating medical falsehoods. Sex ed. is really not what it should be in the United States, and I think a lot of people leave school just as confused as before (if not more so). I follow this author on Twitter and she's really funny and amazing, and I love how she sticks it to male trolls and idiots perpetuating medical falsehoods. Sex ed. is really not what it should be in the United States, and I think a lot of people leave school just as confused as before (if not more so).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    If you have a vagina, you should read this book; if you don’t but love one (or more), you should read parts of it, as well. If you do have knowledge about it – and you definitely should – this will not be a groundbreaking reading, but you’ll still learn some interesting facts from it. Not to mention the writing style, which is compelling as hell; if all non-fiction books & science (generally speaking) would be written like this, I don’t think I’ll stop reading them. And if she really is in real li If you have a vagina, you should read this book; if you don’t but love one (or more), you should read parts of it, as well. If you do have knowledge about it – and you definitely should – this will not be a groundbreaking reading, but you’ll still learn some interesting facts from it. Not to mention the writing style, which is compelling as hell; if all non-fiction books & science (generally speaking) would be written like this, I don’t think I’ll stop reading them. And if she really is in real life as she is in her book, it would be wonderful all doctors to have the same ”vagenda” as hers; most of them don’t tell anything unless you ask, and then they seem annoyed to explain such a 'trivial' question you dared asking… The book is extensively researched and covers all topics regarding female genitals that you can think of; I’m still trying to find something not covered, at least briefly, by it. There were parts which did not interest me much, such as pregnancy or trans-men, however they were interesting to read as well. I must say I’m amazed by what some women do to their vagina, in terms of hygiene: drying their vulvas with hair-dryers or wiping the interior with cleaning wipes or other chemicals (why on earth would you do that?!). And here is one answer: “77 percent of women aged 18–25 said they washed inside their vagina because that was what their partner wanted.” (?!) Guys, stop asking that and do your homework! She debunks some myths related to what one sees in porn and thinks as accurate, as it is not. I liked her comparison on this: “Sex in porn is about as realistic as driving is in car chase scenes in action movies.” This too, on cleaning: “Just keep in mind you’re not removing baked-on food and you don’t have to nuke the influenza virus, so nothing harsh or bactericidal is needed.” and “Wipes, sprays, and odor-control suppositories could very easily kill good bacteria and irritate the mucus and the lining of the vagina in the same way as douches. Every one of them also has damaging messages on the packaging, such as “effectively masks natural odors” and “wonderful tropical scent.” It’s a vagina, not a piña colada.” Anyway, I could put here entire pages with her quotes, but I’ll leave you to discover it by yourself. And trust me, there are things to learn even if you know a lot. And even if you don’t learn much, you’ll love the author and her common-sense, well-addressed advices. Highly recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ ilikebooksbest.com ❤️

    Everything you wanted to know about the vagina but were afraid to ask, or didn’t know who to ask, or couldn’t find anyone to ask Jennifer Gunter covers the vagina basics such as where everything is located and what everything is for, including what makes up the Vulva, and the parts and anatomy of the clitoris. She goes on to debunk and or prove myths such as is there really a G-spot or is it really just the parts of the clitoris near the bladder and vaginal wall on some women filled with blood an Everything you wanted to know about the vagina but were afraid to ask, or didn’t know who to ask, or couldn’t find anyone to ask Jennifer Gunter covers the vagina basics such as where everything is located and what everything is for, including what makes up the Vulva, and the parts and anatomy of the clitoris. She goes on to debunk and or prove myths such as is there really a G-spot or is it really just the parts of the clitoris near the bladder and vaginal wall on some women filled with blood and sensitive? Does eating pineapple really make a woman’s vagina smell and taste sweeter? Can women really ejaculate and if so, what is the fluid (FYI- it is not as sexy as men like to think). There is information on the vagina for transgender women as well. And information on Pregnancy, menstruation, menopause. She talks about food and the vagina, clothes/fabrics and the vagina, cleansing products and moisturizers. There are a lot of facts and statistics so people can know what is average. There is a lot of misinformation out there, not only about the vagina but about females and sex. So she is putting everything out there and I like that. It is definitely written like non-fiction (since it is). And tends to get a bit boring and clinical at times, but the book has a ton of great information. I could go on and on about the subjects in this book. Of course all the STI’s and infections are in here, including all the scary statistics like how many people out there have Herpes and don’t know it. I love how each chapter ends with a section called the Bottom Line and has a list of bullet points highlighting some of the main things she discussed in the chapter. Like the main points to take away. It ends nicely with a bunch more popular myths debunked. Did you know that we don’t actually need 8 glasses of water each day? Thanks to Netgalley for providing me with the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Ok. Those who need to, just scoot on to the next review. I know there is a low tolerance for TMI. See you later. I love Mary Roach as an author, and this author, Jen Gunter, reminds me quite a bit of Ms. Roach. There is not as much humor as Gulp, or Stiff or Bonk, but there is the same steady, down to earth doctor talk that is believable and myth-busting. Jen Gunter is no-nonsense and as a doctor is just like you want her to be. Besides all the plain facts, she takes into account life as it is liv Ok. Those who need to, just scoot on to the next review. I know there is a low tolerance for TMI. See you later. I love Mary Roach as an author, and this author, Jen Gunter, reminds me quite a bit of Ms. Roach. There is not as much humor as Gulp, or Stiff or Bonk, but there is the same steady, down to earth doctor talk that is believable and myth-busting. Jen Gunter is no-nonsense and as a doctor is just like you want her to be. Besides all the plain facts, she takes into account life as it is lived now (not 50 years ago), and also shares her experience and preferences, the whys and wherefors after claiming them as such. I appreciated her clear delineation between what is, what is preferred by some and what she personally prefers - all are presented with the equal weight - she doesn't espouse one right way. On the other hand, when it comes to body health, best practices and medical remedies she is unequivocal. She also has strong opinions about social shaping of feminine ideals by male priorities over the whole of human development. This is a unique time in which we live - one where women have been accorded more vocal power, more access to information and social flexibility to if not make change then at least have more intentional freedom in their choices about their bodies. The Vagina Bible covers everything from soup to nuts - all of it. I do recommend the audio version, narrated by the author. I enjoyed hearing her own particular emphasis. I usually listen "out loud" as I'm most often alone in my listening. But this, you'd probably want to listen with "ears" to preserve any blush factors and the ability to fast forward if she's talking about something you don't want to know more about. Every woman should have a chance to consider on their own, this frank information. There are answers to questions you never dared ask, or think about; you'll be disabused of some of the stuff you've made up on your own or with the help of others who were also making stuff up. You find out normal isn't necessary normal, and weird might just be very normal. I wish I could have given this book to my girls when they fledged, but it wasn't around. They are fully fledged now, and I'm still giving them the nudge to be brave and check this out. If you are brave, and have one, this is the owner's manual for which we've all been looking. 5 perfectly PHd stars. My thanks to the author for putting it out there (ha! pun intended).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Kramer

    I’m going to make a bold claim: if you are a person with a vagina, you need this book. Whether you read it front to back or use it as a resource tool, it is one of the most important books I’ve read for my own health and well-being and I commend it to everyone. I’m a relatively informed cis-het woman and I still learned so much in this book. Dr. Jen Gunter writes in an accessible, engaging style. Her astute insights and observations are interspersed with humor and wit. Her goal is to empower and I’m going to make a bold claim: if you are a person with a vagina, you need this book. Whether you read it front to back or use it as a resource tool, it is one of the most important books I’ve read for my own health and well-being and I commend it to everyone. I’m a relatively informed cis-het woman and I still learned so much in this book. Dr. Jen Gunter writes in an accessible, engaging style. Her astute insights and observations are interspersed with humor and wit. Her goal is to empower and inform and she more than did the job. I especially appreciated how she showed the role of patriarchy in women’s health: "Medicine has been steeped in man-splaining from the start.” We need so much more research and information on vaginas and vulvas and she is shining a bright light for us. There are chapters like how to discuss concerns with your doctor, as well as chapters on topics like menopause, genital hygiene, Toxic Shock Syndrome (not as big of a risk as I thought!), and hair removal. It’s one of the most thorough resources I’ve ever read and I feel so much more empowered as a result, as well as more aware of what I didn’t know before because of how little good information is out there. We are constantly exposed to poor research and often gaslit for our concerns so it is beyond helpful to have a guide at the ready should you experience any symptoms or receive a diagnosis. This is a truly inclusive book. Chapter 3 is specifically about trans people: Vaginas and Vulvas in Transition. It was so great to see the various concerns and barriers to care addressed. Throughout the book, she specifically notes risk factors and concerns for those who are lesbian, bisexual, or trans. The myth-busting portions proved to be particularly valuable, whether it was something I’d heard or done before or not. For instance, I was flummoxed to learn wearing cotton underwear to prevent yeast infections is a myth. Something I've heard my whole life! But there’s negligible research to prove that claim, no matter how often I’ve heard that advice. Same goes with peeing after sex to prevent a UTI. Two studies showed there is no correlation there. Related to all this myth-busting is Gunter’s stringent research methodology. She takes great pains to reference when research has been negligible, when sample sizes are too small to give us clear results, when more search is needed, and so on. She backs up her work and shows where more information was needed to make a determination. There’s also an entire chapter on how to evaluate medical research, which includes how to determine whether bias is at play and where to even start online. As someone who was a sociology major, I wish this was something more people knew, particularly how to evaluate research quality, so I was glad to see her lay it out. I’ll be recommending this one to everyone I know. All my gratitude to Dr. Gunter for writing it. Disclosure: I received an advanced copy from Citadel Press in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bedlam

    If you only read one bible this year this is it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    3.5/5 I'm struggling with what to rate this book - I think I'm somewhere between a 3 and a 4. In Dr. Gunter's introduction, she says to use it as either a reference or read it straight-through. I chose to do both: I read 100 pages straight, and then I looked up topics I was particularly curious about. There is a lot to love about Dr. Gunter's book. I found her book extremely readable - she writes like your friend-doctor with whom you're getting a cup of coffee. Who knew reading about reproductive 3.5/5 I'm struggling with what to rate this book - I think I'm somewhere between a 3 and a 4. In Dr. Gunter's introduction, she says to use it as either a reference or read it straight-through. I chose to do both: I read 100 pages straight, and then I looked up topics I was particularly curious about. There is a lot to love about Dr. Gunter's book. I found her book extremely readable - she writes like your friend-doctor with whom you're getting a cup of coffee. Who knew reading about reproductive organs could be so enjoyable? I am also extremely grateful for and encouraged by the fact that she spends a lot of time reminding the reader that so many of the misconceptions we have around our bodies are a result of what was previously a male-dominated medical field and, in general, male perspectives. It's easy to feel "less than", and the fact that she addresses that a lot of the ideas we have about are bodies are non-scientific is so important. I wish more women we read this book for that reason. The problem, though, with having such a personable writing style, is that there may be people who are turned off by it. I personally am grateful for the feminist educational stance within this book, but I remember reading one passage that felt a little like, "UGH, men." I also didn't necessarily agree with one of the theories I read (bear in mind I have no medical training). My fear is that, because Dr. Gunter is so unapologetically herself in this book, the people who might need this education the most may not read it. This book exhaustively addresses various topics surrounding the reproductive organs, as far as I can tell. Again, no medical training here, but I was able to answer some questions I had as well as learn a bunch. Because the book covers a lot of material, I believe it would be a good resource for women of all ages. I do think the book could be organized a bit more intuitively - from what I read, some topics would be addressed in passing in one section, and then brought up again in an independent chapter. I also wish there had been a few more diagrams - I think they would have helped someone like me (with no experience with anatomy) navigate some of the terms a bit better. Overall, I think this book is extremely encouraging, educational, and thorough. I plan to keep it on my shelf as a resource for years to come. *This book was graciously provided by Kensington Books. I have attempted to remain as impartial as possible while leaving this review.*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Éimhear (A Little Haze)

    Incredibly informative novel written in a very accessible style. Debunks a lot of myths that are out there about vulval health. Personally I would have liked a little more about the female reproductive system as a whole but I accept that that was outside the remit of the novel given the title. Great to see the experience of trans women included. Recommended. Also highly recommend following the author Dr Jen Gunter on twitter for more science and medicine based information. For more reviews and Incredibly informative novel written in a very accessible style. Debunks a lot of myths that are out there about vulval health. Personally I would have liked a little more about the female reproductive system as a whole but I accept that that was outside the remit of the novel given the title. Great to see the experience of trans women included. Recommended. Also highly recommend following the author Dr Jen Gunter on twitter for more science and medicine based information. For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog Follow me on Twitter Friend me on Goodreads

  12. 5 out of 5

    Isil Arican

    I love Jen Gunter's work, admire her contribution to science based medicine and support her fight against misinformation around women's healthcare. I have been following her for some time on twitter and in various blogs, and when I hear she was writing this book I was thrilled. Women's health is ignored and dismissed on so many levels, it is hard to find reliable and more importantly digestable information without the myths and misogyny surrounding it. This is a book every vagina owner ( natural I love Jen Gunter's work, admire her contribution to science based medicine and support her fight against misinformation around women's healthcare. I have been following her for some time on twitter and in various blogs, and when I hear she was writing this book I was thrilled. Women's health is ignored and dismissed on so many levels, it is hard to find reliable and more importantly digestable information without the myths and misogyny surrounding it. This is a book every vagina owner ( natural or surgically constructed) should read, as well as anyone who loves a vagina owner. The book provides detailed information on female anatomy, various organs and their functions, their physiology, major and common complaints about female reproductive system, and its major disorders and diseases, all written in a very easy to understand, easy to follow, no bullshiting style, without the heavy jargon. Furthermore, she also explains major stages of a female from the reproductive system perspective including menstruation, ovulation, pregnancy, menopause and birth control, and give suggestions and recommendation for everyday care. While reading all this I loved Jen's wit and her sense of humor, and her directness about the issues we tend to avoid to discuss. It was a wonderful read. I should also mention that even though I am trained as a medical doctor myself and knew most of the things described in the book, I learned some new things I didn't know. I plan to gift this book to my female friends, hoping they too, will learn something they didn't know about themselves.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    ARC received via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Wow, I'm so glad I chose to read this book. It's phenomenal. It's a book where knowledge meets humor. So you can only imagine that this is a fun read that at the same time gives you much needed information about a woman's body, mostly about the vagina as well as the vulva. I really enjoyed reading about the different functions each part has and also about the numerous trends. Some were really crazy and I for sure would not try them out ARC received via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Wow, I'm so glad I chose to read this book. It's phenomenal. It's a book where knowledge meets humor. So you can only imagine that this is a fun read that at the same time gives you much needed information about a woman's body, mostly about the vagina as well as the vulva. I really enjoyed reading about the different functions each part has and also about the numerous trends. Some were really crazy and I for sure would not try them out but to each it's own, right? What also helped with the reading were also the detailed sketches and the many details. Since this book is written by a doctor that has worked as a gynecologist for twenty-four years and therefore has a lot of experience in this field, I would highly recommend to read this book. And to be honest, this book is for everyone. Not just women. Anyone who wants to know more about this subject is not going to regret the decision to read this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    I'd never heard of Dr. Jen Gunter before, but since reading this book, I found out that she's got quite an online reputation and following (as well as her own column in the NYT), and is a crusader against Gwyneth Paltrow's "health venture" Goop, who, among many other ethically questionable products (at best ineffective, at worst potentially harmful), promotes sticking a $60+ jade egg up your vagina for "spiritual detox"... I can get behind anyone loudly advocating against that. Dr. Gunter has a v I'd never heard of Dr. Jen Gunter before, but since reading this book, I found out that she's got quite an online reputation and following (as well as her own column in the NYT), and is a crusader against Gwyneth Paltrow's "health venture" Goop, who, among many other ethically questionable products (at best ineffective, at worst potentially harmful), promotes sticking a $60+ jade egg up your vagina for "spiritual detox"... I can get behind anyone loudly advocating against that. Dr. Gunter has a very simple "vagenda"—to debunk old wives' tales and combat the misinformation women are confronted with, by providing a comprehensive guidebook of accurate, medically sound information, because only someone armed with fact-based knowledge has the necessary tools to give informed consent when it comes to their health. The Vagina Bible (which covers the vulva and uterus as well) is broken up in sections and chapters that cover everything from the most basic anatomy, maintenance and care, menstruation and menopause, as well as STIs and other medical conditions. Each chapter is fairly short and snappy, full of good information and refutation of bad one, with the most important pieces of info summed up at the end of each with a handy list of bullet points. Despite having almost thirty years of experience as an OB/GYN, Gunter has been a blogger and columnist for many years, and her writing is the opposite of clinical, but rather lively, engaging, and often quite funny—my favorite out-of-context quote is definitely "it's a vagina, not a piña colada". The title and subject matter may give the mistaken impression that this book adheres to a sex binary, but Gunter often goes into how certain conditions can affect trans* people transitioning from either sex, and I appreciated her making the effort to be inclusive of someone who probably has an even harder time acquiring the information they need. As for myself, I thought that I had a fairly good idea about my own bits, but this book schooled me and definitely filled some gaps—for instance, I never questioned the (what I now know to be a) myth that peeing after sex decreases the chances of getting a UTI, because it seemed oddly plausible to me. I also learned that having gotten my first period early in life won't mean that I'll go into menopause earlier, but the prolonged exposure to those hormones increases my risk of getting breast cancer down the line—how's that for a cheery thought? I've never (thankfully, knock on wood) suffered from any STD, yeast infection, UTI or anything of the sort (and this book made me appreciate just how lucky that is, given the prevalence), so all of that was a wealth of new information for me, although I admit that the latter half of the book felt very US-centric, since Gunter goes into treatment options in detail, giving commercial names of medication and their recommended dosage for intervention. Those chapters weren't as captivating to read because they were so packed with information I didn't have use for, but the right audience will surely appreciate it, and they're a good resource to have after a doctor's appointment if you have any lingering doubts about a diagnosis or prescription and are trying to decide whether you should get a second opinion. For myself, I would've liked it if she'd gone more in-depth about different types of hormonal birth control—I've switched to the mini-pill at the start of the year and have started questioning that choice, and there wasn't much on that to be found within these pages, and I missed a chapter on endometriosis, a condition I fear I may suffer from, and a fear every gynecologist I've seen about it has dismissed without any testing. Some omissions that probably would've been well beyond the scope of the book aside, The Vagina Bible is basically a vulva and vagina encyclopaedia where medical knowledge and myth busting meet a good dose of humor, and I'd recommend it to anyone who has (or used to have) a vagina, and to anyone who loves someone with one—my own partner has expressed interest in reading this for his own education, and I'll gladly pass it on. ————— Note: I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    4,5 αστέρια Ένα αξιόλογο βιβλίο, από μια έμπειρη και καταξιωμένη γυναικολόγο, που καλό είναι να υπάρχει σε κάθε βιβλιοθήκη. Δικαιώνει τον όρο "Βίβλος" γιατί πραγματικά λειτουργεί σαν μια τέτοια. Ως προς τη μεριά των πληροφοριών είναι ένα ενημερωμένο, επεξηγηματικό και κατατοπιστικό βιβλίο που καταδεικνύει όχι μόνο τα διάφορα γυναικολογικά ζητήματα αλλά και καταρρίπτει μύθους που έχουμε ακούσει γύρω από αυτά. Ως προς το τεχνικό κομμάτι μου άρεσε ο χωρισμός των ενοτήτων και τα σύντομα κεφάλαια 4,5 αστέρια Ένα αξιόλογο βιβλίο, από μια έμπειρη και καταξιωμένη γυναικολόγο, που καλό είναι να υπάρχει σε κάθε βιβλιοθήκη. Δικαιώνει τον όρο "Βίβλος" γιατί πραγματικά λειτουργεί σαν μια τέτοια. Ως προς τη μεριά των πληροφοριών είναι ένα ενημερωμένο, επεξηγηματικό και κατατοπιστικό βιβλίο που καταδεικνύει όχι μόνο τα διάφορα γυναικολογικά ζητήματα αλλά και καταρρίπτει μύθους που έχουμε ακούσει γύρω από αυτά. Ως προς το τεχνικό κομμάτι μου άρεσε ο χωρισμός των ενοτήτων και τα σύντομα κεφάλαια της κάθε ενότητας. Προσπαθεί να εξηγήσει τα διάφορα γυναικολογικά ζητήματα με κατανοητή γραφή, με απλό τρόπο και με αρκετές δόσεις χιούμορ. (view spoiler)[ "Μπορώ όμως να φανταστώ το Sexual Competence of Rats [Σεξουαλική Ικανότητα Ποντικιών] ως όνομα πανκ μπάντας που τα μέλη της δεν ξέφυγαν ποτέ απ' το υπόγειο των γονιών τους γιατί δεν έκανε επιτυχία το πρώτο τους σινγκλ με τίτλο Thrusting [Σπρώχνοντας]." (hide spoiler)]

  16. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Very short review time! This book is incredibly informative and interesting if you're at all interested in vulva and vaginal health and maintenance. This book goes into a lot of anatomical information, medical information (diseases, illnesses, infections, irritations, and issues) that affect people with vulvas and vaginas, and all manner of other various bits of relevant info pertaining to holistic (meaning whole body, not frou frou crystal shit) wellness as it relates to them. Birth control, ho Very short review time! This book is incredibly informative and interesting if you're at all interested in vulva and vaginal health and maintenance. This book goes into a lot of anatomical information, medical information (diseases, illnesses, infections, irritations, and issues) that affect people with vulvas and vaginas, and all manner of other various bits of relevant info pertaining to holistic (meaning whole body, not frou frou crystal shit) wellness as it relates to them. Birth control, hormone therapy, care and handling, hair removal, bleeding, period pain, TSS, lubrication... if ever you feel the need to have a Vagina Trivia Night... this book is here for you. As the proud bearer of my very own vagina, I found so much information useful and helpful just in normalizing conversations and providing a basis for having them with my gyno. I am that person that just goes in, gets it over with, and when my lovely doctor asks if I have any questions or concerns or want to talk about anything... I'm like a blank slate. BUT, maybe not next time. I am not really a squeamish or overly embarrassed sort (as evidenced by me discussing my bits here in this review!), so it's not that I am worried she might judge me or something... it's just more the "This is normal for me, so what's there to discuss?" thing that I have now realized is maybe not such a normal thing after all. (I often have debilitatingly painful periods, so next time I go in, I shall discuss this with my doctor and not just continue dealing with it in silence as I have for far too long.) Anyway. This book is very pro-feminism, in a "women/people with vaginas healthcare IS healthcare" way, and pro-equity of access and information and assistance and advocacy. Otherwise, it's apolitical. She gives straight up facts based on studies and information available currently, and outlines it in an accessible and lay-person friendly way, though it can be a bit dry at times (She recommends water based lube for that. :P). This is definitely a reference type book, not a narrative type book, but I still think it should be required reading (or at least referencing) if you have, or know someone who has, a vagina. :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emmkay

    Admirably and exhaustively educational - nothing like settling into a chapter on ‘pubic lice’ for your bedtime reading. Gunter’s educational campaign extends to other topics that my middle-aged brain was only vaguely aware of and had no need to be dissuaded from, ranging from crocheted tampons found on Etsy to having one’s own plasma injected into one’s clitoris. Not things that were included in the 70s copy of Our Bodies, Ourselves in my home when I was growing up. Still contains line drawings, Admirably and exhaustively educational - nothing like settling into a chapter on ‘pubic lice’ for your bedtime reading. Gunter’s educational campaign extends to other topics that my middle-aged brain was only vaguely aware of and had no need to be dissuaded from, ranging from crocheted tampons found on Etsy to having one’s own plasma injected into one’s clitoris. Not things that were included in the 70s copy of Our Bodies, Ourselves in my home when I was growing up. Still contains line drawings, though. 3.5.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Raine McLeod

    Not what I expected. It’s very good for reference and there’s honestly a lot more going on down there than I thought. Only gets 4 stars because she spends a huge chunk of the book talking about men (transwomen) who neither have a vagina (an inverted penis is not a vagina) nor will ever need a gynaecologist (because they do not and will never have a vagina). It pisses me off that we can’t even have a book called THE VAGINA BIBLE without having to pander to fucking men’s delusions.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Wagner

    Wow!! I'm 33, a mom, college educated, professional, and a mostly Internet savvy feminist. And I learned SO MUCH from this book! I have to recommend it to anyone and everyone who has a vagina. I mean it. Everyone who has a vagina, including trans women and nonbinary folks. This book is written with diversity in mind and addresses numerous issues specific to these groups. In fact, once I got done reading I donated my copy to my local center for youth between the ages of 14 and 24 who are experienc Wow!! I'm 33, a mom, college educated, professional, and a mostly Internet savvy feminist. And I learned SO MUCH from this book! I have to recommend it to anyone and everyone who has a vagina. I mean it. Everyone who has a vagina, including trans women and nonbinary folks. This book is written with diversity in mind and addresses numerous issues specific to these groups. In fact, once I got done reading I donated my copy to my local center for youth between the ages of 14 and 24 who are experiencing unsafe or unstable housing, many of whom are LGBTQ+ and likely have limited access to compassionate health care. The best part about this book isn't the anatomy lessons or descriptions of STDs and their remedies. The best part is the incredible, timely MYTH BUSTING! What is commonly referred to as "old wives' tales" are a thing of the past. Yes, they do persist, but nobody I know actually douches anymore, for example. We scoff at our mothers for having done so. What we have now is the casual misinformation of reputable-looking health topic websites like Livestrong, which generally show up on the first page of Google search results and tend to perpetuate many of the modern myths about vaginas that I actually believed. Here are some bombs from this book: Peeing after sex doesn't prevent UTIs. Wearing only cotton panties doesn't prevent yeast infections. Removing the hair from your labia can increase your risk of contracting STDs. That whole Chris Pratt meme about pooing and that frustrating "wiping a marker" sensation? You don't need to wipe that hard. The harder you wipe, the more poop comes out. You should basically be blotting down there. Marijuana and alcohol make you physically worse at sex. Men, too. But since so much of arousal is about lowering inhibitions and feeling relaxed, they might help anyway. These are juuuuuuuuuuuuust a few examples of the amazing revelations this book has to offer. Seriously, if you have a vag, check out this book. Then pass it on to someone else who has a vag. Edit: I just deleted a really disgusting transphobic comment. Please don't bother commenting on my review if you're going to be blatantly insulting to the almost 1 million transgender people in the US. If you're trans, please know that you deserve skilled, compassionate medical care that respects your health and wholeness.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ariel ✨

    Dr. Jennifer Gunter crams a lot of valuable, dense information in this little tome. At times it became a little too dense as if she forgot she wasn't writing a textbook for medical students. I'm glad this book exists, but a few sections gave me pause. I started to feel almost defensive of natural menstrual sanitation tools and techniques that I don't even use because of the way she dismissed them so flippantly, but she does dig deep into shaving vs. waxing, the microtraumas these grooming practi Dr. Jennifer Gunter crams a lot of valuable, dense information in this little tome. At times it became a little too dense as if she forgot she wasn't writing a textbook for medical students. I'm glad this book exists, but a few sections gave me pause. I started to feel almost defensive of natural menstrual sanitation tools and techniques that I don't even use because of the way she dismissed them so flippantly, but she does dig deep into shaving vs. waxing, the microtraumas these grooming practices cause, and which are the best techniques because of *choice* and *bodily autonomy*. :/ The organization of the chapters also felt disordered and repetitive. There was some information I have not seen explored in nearly as much depth from a medical standpoint, like the way testosterone affects the vagina and vulva. Dr. Gunter pulls from both medical research and personal experience to present these topics in a way that seems complete, but she is still a person with biases. She comes down hard on certain sides of contested medical practices, and it makes the way she explores these issues feel somewhat dishonest. Yes, she is very well-informed and has established her own opinions through her education and years of medical experience, but so have other doctors with just as much education and experience. To not acknowledge the controversies around certain birthing practices, hygiene techniques, hormone therapies, or medications made me take each section with several grains of salt. I'd love to read other doctors' takes on this book. We definitely need more books like this. There was so much I didn't know I didn't know about my body, and I'm just a little enraged about the inadequate education we all receive regarding half the population's anatomy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    This is more a book that you read in fits and starts, rather than cover to cover. I read it cover to cover. And I learned a lot! I also got mad by how much misinformation and old wives' tales there are out there, and by how the female body has really been exploited by patriarchy. I also learned that some women dry their vulvas with hair dryers. NOOOOOO! I screamed. I also realized that I should probably boil my tweezers, or at the very least, clean them more often. I like Jen Gunter's personable, This is more a book that you read in fits and starts, rather than cover to cover. I read it cover to cover. And I learned a lot! I also got mad by how much misinformation and old wives' tales there are out there, and by how the female body has really been exploited by patriarchy. I also learned that some women dry their vulvas with hair dryers. NOOOOOO! I screamed. I also realized that I should probably boil my tweezers, or at the very least, clean them more often. I like Jen Gunter's personable, no-nonsense, matter of a fact, science based approach. Her approach is friendly and factual. I wish she was my doctor. This is a great book, and I hope a lot of people have a look at it. It's also non-heternormative (except one part), and trans friendly.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Doidge

    REQUIRED READING FOR EVERY WOMAN!! I really need to blog about it. I learned numerous things within the first few pages (I'm almost embarrassed to admit my ignorance!)(and I should re-read). Very accessibly written. I desperately need the author's book on perimenopause NOW! REQUIRED READING FOR EVERY WOMAN!! I really need to blog about it. I learned numerous things within the first few pages (I'm almost embarrassed to admit my ignorance!)(and I should re-read). Very accessibly written. I desperately need the author's book on perimenopause NOW!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lubinka Dimitrova

    The Vagina Bible is written with much love for the woman, and it shows. Dr. Gunter has a refreshingly no-nonsense approach to the topics she examines, and does not shy away from scolding both men and women for some outrageous ideas that people believe and perpetuate, sometimes unwillingly, due to lack of knowledge, sometimes consciously, for a variety of reasons. In any case, the book is heavy on practical, detailed information for a ton of symptoms, ailments, treatments and general advice (which The Vagina Bible is written with much love for the woman, and it shows. Dr. Gunter has a refreshingly no-nonsense approach to the topics she examines, and does not shy away from scolding both men and women for some outrageous ideas that people believe and perpetuate, sometimes unwillingly, due to lack of knowledge, sometimes consciously, for a variety of reasons. In any case, the book is heavy on practical, detailed information for a ton of symptoms, ailments, treatments and general advice (which obvously was its intention to start with), and a big portion of it is not really relevant to most people. I imagine it will be an excellent reference book in case of need, but not really engrossing for a casual reading cover to cover.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Dr. Jen Gunter, author and OB-GYN professional, created a guide detailing the intricacies of the female anatomy. She also devotes countless paragraphs addressing and dispelling myths associated with this subject, and there are plenty of those. This isn’t the type of book one reads from cover to cover. It’s more like an encyclopedia of data and facts sprinkled with the author’s personal experiences and in some instances opinions. A good go to source especially for women. While I didn’t agree with Dr. Jen Gunter, author and OB-GYN professional, created a guide detailing the intricacies of the female anatomy. She also devotes countless paragraphs addressing and dispelling myths associated with this subject, and there are plenty of those. This isn’t the type of book one reads from cover to cover. It’s more like an encyclopedia of data and facts sprinkled with the author’s personal experiences and in some instances opinions. A good go to source especially for women. While I didn’t agree with everything I read, Dr. Gunter offers her view on a variety of topics.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keely Langford

    Written as though we’re at hers, having a book club, and we had some questions. We aren’t idiots, we aren’t doctors, we are people, and frankly, there’s some stuff we should know. She’s not: “I know everything” but: “Here’s what I know so far and why I’ve made this decision. Do with that what you will.”

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    This is a reference book, not an interesting nonfiction book after the first third or so. It's a good reference book but I'm a little annoyed I read the whole thing. This is a reference book, not an interesting nonfiction book after the first third or so. It's a good reference book but I'm a little annoyed I read the whole thing.

  27. 5 out of 5

    books4chess

    "It’s a vagina, not a piña colada." This is no exaggeration when I say Dr Jen Gunter has delivered the best book for your health if you have a vagina or know someone with one. Niche medical conditions, cleaning, vagina considerations needed for trans men and women and then some. There are no frills attached and an overload of information in a well ordered manner. The inclusive bible is one of the best vaginal education books I’ve read because it separates fact from anecdote and old wives tales. It "It’s a vagina, not a piña colada." This is no exaggeration when I say Dr Jen Gunter has delivered the best book for your health if you have a vagina or know someone with one. Niche medical conditions, cleaning, vagina considerations needed for trans men and women and then some. There are no frills attached and an overload of information in a well ordered manner. The inclusive bible is one of the best vaginal education books I’ve read because it separates fact from anecdote and old wives tales. It gives the reader an in-depth understanding down to the last detail, of how conditions occur and a variety of treatment options. There is no judgement, only support and a lot of science. There is a WHOLE CHAPTER dedicated to vulvodynia. To date, I’ve read said chapter 5 times. It is so hard to find books that go in detail and don’t include someone’s anecdote about “pain will be forever”. I refuse to accept that and Dr Jen doesn’t even hint at it. This is THE book you need to read before a gyno, GP or pelvic floor appointment to help you advocate for yourself. Rating the book 5/5 feels poor form, given this isn’t a light-hearted novel or deliciously written memoir but arguably the foundational work of the vaginal education we deserve and have been waiting for. Alas, maths goes against me and it’s the only score I can give. If you have the opportunity to buy this, regardless of who are you, I strongly urge it. Lets all really learn about the vagina and move forward together.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maud

    One of my goals for 2020 is to read more non-fiction on topics that I find interesting and want to know more of. After reading this book I feel baffled that there were so many things about my own body that I didn't know. For reference: I have grown up and always lived in the Netherlands, where sex education is a big part of our education. I believe I started learning about reproductive systems around the age of 11/12. I also remember thinking that I always found it weird how much attention there One of my goals for 2020 is to read more non-fiction on topics that I find interesting and want to know more of. After reading this book I feel baffled that there were so many things about my own body that I didn't know. For reference: I have grown up and always lived in the Netherlands, where sex education is a big part of our education. I believe I started learning about reproductive systems around the age of 11/12. I also remember thinking that I always found it weird how much attention there was to the male organs, and pregnancy and STD's but not for the rest of the female body (or cycle), problems that woman can have or even pleasure. I really wish I could hand this book into the hands of publishers and writers of schoolbooks. The tone of the author, with humour but in no way mocking of issues that women have mentioned and with no shame, made this such an easy read. I enjoyed it from the first till the last page. At some points I found myself losing attention because things were a bit repetitive or dry but I believe that was more so on me than on the author. I highly recommend this to everyone, whether or not you have the organs mentioned. I know I will be putting this book in the hands of my future children when they reach their teen years.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    Surprisingly, my husband heard about this book first, then told me. I promptly put it on hold at our library and was delightfully, intrigued and informed. The no-nonsense author and doctor, writes a pithy organized book that every women should read. Favorite chapter at the end: “Journal of Old Wives’ Tales.” Recommend.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    Can I say it was a little dry? But hey, it is important to read about the God you worship.

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