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Wolf Children: Ame Yuki (light novel)

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When Hana worked up the courage to speak to the mysterious loner in her college class, she never expected the encounter would blossom into true love-nor that he was secretly a wolf living in human form. Their relationship was far from ordinary, but she wouldn't have had it any other way. Her joy only grows with the births of Ame and Yuki, who have inherited their father's When Hana worked up the courage to speak to the mysterious loner in her college class, she never expected the encounter would blossom into true love-nor that he was secretly a wolf living in human form. Their relationship was far from ordinary, but she wouldn't have had it any other way. Her joy only grows with the births of Ame and Yuki, who have inherited their father's unique ability to transform. But life is full of both joy and hardship, and Hana is left to bring up her little wolves on her own. Raising human children is hard enough...but how will she handle their wild side, too? In this novelization of his award-winning Wolf Children film, acclaimed director Mamoru Hosoda provides a deeper look at the emotional trials and triumphs of a very unique little family.


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When Hana worked up the courage to speak to the mysterious loner in her college class, she never expected the encounter would blossom into true love-nor that he was secretly a wolf living in human form. Their relationship was far from ordinary, but she wouldn't have had it any other way. Her joy only grows with the births of Ame and Yuki, who have inherited their father's When Hana worked up the courage to speak to the mysterious loner in her college class, she never expected the encounter would blossom into true love-nor that he was secretly a wolf living in human form. Their relationship was far from ordinary, but she wouldn't have had it any other way. Her joy only grows with the births of Ame and Yuki, who have inherited their father's unique ability to transform. But life is full of both joy and hardship, and Hana is left to bring up her little wolves on her own. Raising human children is hard enough...but how will she handle their wild side, too? In this novelization of his award-winning Wolf Children film, acclaimed director Mamoru Hosoda provides a deeper look at the emotional trials and triumphs of a very unique little family.

30 review for Wolf Children: Ame Yuki (light novel)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ammar Naaimi

    Absolutely phenomenal. My heart's so full right now 🤩 Absolutely phenomenal. My heart's so full right now 🤩

  2. 4 out of 5

    Iryna

    This story always moves me to tears in the end. What makes it special to me though is that even my mother is very interested in reading the Light Novel after I showed her the first half of the movie years ago. And she's not interested in Anime or Manga. I think to this story, even if it's about "wolf children", most parents can relate and enjoy it. And children, teenager, who are searching their way in life, or young adults, too, of course. I think everyone can relate to some of the characters or This story always moves me to tears in the end. What makes it special to me though is that even my mother is very interested in reading the Light Novel after I showed her the first half of the movie years ago. And she's not interested in Anime or Manga. I think to this story, even if it's about "wolf children", most parents can relate and enjoy it. And children, teenager, who are searching their way in life, or young adults, too, of course. I think everyone can relate to some of the characters or parts of the story in some way and that's why everyone is able to enjoy this story. Still only 4/5★ because I wasn't quite fond with the writing itself, especially at the start. But it went better around the half.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    It was really cute and sweet and yes odd given the premise. This is the first light novel that I've read, not sure if I'll read another one or not. There were moments, especially at the beginning when it felt like things were moving too fast and there were things missing. But then the story begins to be more consistent and has a rhythm. I don't know if that's the way light novels are in general but this one was like that. In the end, it really did feel like I read an anime in book form. It was really cute and sweet and yes odd given the premise. This is the first light novel that I've read, not sure if I'll read another one or not. There were moments, especially at the beginning when it felt like things were moving too fast and there were things missing. But then the story begins to be more consistent and has a rhythm. I don't know if that's the way light novels are in general but this one was like that. In the end, it really did feel like I read an anime in book form.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    -6.5/10 -I wasn't a huge fan of the writing style which made me skip entire paragraphs here and there -Things were described in a bit TOO much detail to the point were it got boring -I finished the whole book in about 3 hours -The character building is done well and there are a few plot twists I did not anticipate -Overall I think that if you want to experience this story you should watch the movie or read the manga instead -6.5/10 -I wasn't a huge fan of the writing style which made me skip entire paragraphs here and there -Things were described in a bit TOO much detail to the point were it got boring -I finished the whole book in about 3 hours -The character building is done well and there are a few plot twists I did not anticipate -Overall I think that if you want to experience this story you should watch the movie or read the manga instead

  5. 4 out of 5

    S.Q. Eries

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In Summary Despite the title Wolf Children: Ame and Yuki, this novel is really about their mother Hana. It follows her as she goes from a lovestruck nineteen-year-old to a single mother of two, from struggling to raise her children in the city to toiling to carve a place for them in the country. While Hosoda-sensei romanticizes Hana’s love for her werewolf, the majority of the book is not the least bit romantic. Rather, it’s mostly difficult circumstances and a lot of hard work. The Review Please n In Summary Despite the title Wolf Children: Ame and Yuki, this novel is really about their mother Hana. It follows her as she goes from a lovestruck nineteen-year-old to a single mother of two, from struggling to raise her children in the city to toiling to carve a place for them in the country. While Hosoda-sensei romanticizes Hana’s love for her werewolf, the majority of the book is not the least bit romantic. Rather, it’s mostly difficult circumstances and a lot of hard work. The Review Please note, I am writing this novel review without having seen the movie it was based on. Hana is a university sophomore when she encounters the mysterious loner in her college class. As it turns out, the standoffish young man is a werewolf. Even so, Hana embraces him and his secret and soon bears a daughter and son with their father’s ability to transform. But hardship strikes when the werewolf unexpectedly dies, and Hana’s left to raise their children on her own. Hosoda-sensei tries to give this novel the aura of a fairytale. Aside from the existence of werewolves, Hana has a couple of dream encounters with her lover. The story also never gives his name, which might be some sort of Japanese literary device. (However, as a Western reader, I found it odd because Hana has his driver’s license so he clearly had a name.) Despite these fantastical elements, the novel did not strike me as romantic or fairytale-like. Even the book’s opener, where Hana falls in love and is at her most carefree, is hardly swoon-worthy material. Hana takes the initiative in the courtship, and the werewolf never gives any professions of love or proposes marriage. He works a blue-collar job, is short on cash, and their dates consist of reading books and walks. Eventually, they move in together, he gets her pregnant so that she has to drop out of university, and shortly after their second child is born, he dies. Thus, Hana’s true struggles begin in the latter half of Chapter 1. Yet the majority of her challenges have less to do with her children being werewolves and more to do with the fact that she’s an isolated single mother without many resources. Her money worries, her lack of sleep, her neighbor who’s angry about her baby’s crying, her older child’s accidents – those are common to many mothers, and not even just the single ones. Certainly, the need for secrecy is an additional burden, but it seems minor compared to the rest. Rather than a unique journey, Hana’s circumstances feel more like a cautionary tale about what happens when you have kids too early in life. Continuing on to Chapter 2, Hana moves her family to the mountains. Partly because of the cheap rent, partly because it’s easier to hide her children’s secret where there are fewer people. Although there are moments where the children explore the wilderness, the focus remains on Hana–her efforts to make their rundown house livable, her city slicker struggle to grow vegetables, and her gradual acceptance by the country community. It’s not until Chapter 3 that the focus really shifts to the children. With their mixed heritage, the identities they ultimately choose are anyone’s guess. As it turns out, those identities get chosen early and abruptly. After a taste of peer interaction with the students at her elementary school. Yuki immediately gives up her wild child behavior to be a girly girl so she can fit in with her friends. Ame’s change is more drastic. After meeting a wild fox who agrees to mentor him, Ame goes from a sickly crybaby who can’t fend off a house cat to a tough wolf disinterested in human society. And for Ame, the decision to ditch his mother’s home to live in the wild comes at the age of ten. Chapter 4 has Hana confronted with her son’s decision to leave for good against the backdrop of a ferocious downpour. As the storm rages, the focus is not so much Ame’s escape into his new world but Hana’s maternal grief and ultimate acceptance to his departure. After that, the story abruptly comes to a tidy end. Despite all the child protective services activities in Chapter 1, Ame’s disappearance doesn’t raise any questions from neighbors, Hana’ coworkers, or Ame’s school. And Yuki goes with her classmates to live in the junior high dorm, leaving Hana smiling happily alone in her remote home with her lover’s driver’s license. The story only follows the children until Yuki turns twelve, which doesn’t allow much space for character development. Though brief, Yuki does have a reasonably interesting character arc, mainly because hers includes her relationships at school. Ame’s is less so. Although he clearly becomes enamored of the wilderness, his only relationship is with a fox, and we aren’t privy to those interactions. Thus, it is predominantly Hana’s journey that takes up the narrative. Although Hosoda-sensei tries to portray her as heroic, I can’t help but see Hana as simply reaping the consequences of poor decision-making. Granted, her lover didn’t abandon her, but he was awfully careless to get himself killed (and not even for anything meaningful). And even if their first pregnancy was an accident, they should’ve known better than to get pregnant again so quickly if money was truly tight. Finally, her smile-through-everything attitude is unrelatable and unrealistic. When Grandpa Nirasaki snaps at her, “Why do you always have that phony smile on your face?” I wholeheartedly agree. For more manga and book reviews, drop by my blog Keeping It In Canon!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lara Vehar

    I still enjoyed the characters and story but I like the manga just a little bit more. I really, really hated the parts where characters started laughing and there was just random ha ha ha or hee heee hee thrown in - it looked so awkward and it really took me out of the story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    The light novel didn't hit me much as the movie does, where I'd bawled and it had left me in a strucken; blank state of mind. The movie had left me with enormous hole in my heart. "He told me I should always smile, even when life was painful or hard- even when I didn't want to. If I could do that, I could get through just about anything." The fact that she has to bear losing her family at such young age, seeing her husband being thrown like a trash, can't hold a proper funeral for him, being eye The light novel didn't hit me much as the movie does, where I'd bawled and it had left me in a strucken; blank state of mind. The movie had left me with enormous hole in my heart. "He told me I should always smile, even when life was painful or hard- even when I didn't want to. If I could do that, I could get through just about anything." The fact that she has to bear losing her family at such young age, seeing her husband being thrown like a trash, can't hold a proper funeral for him, being eyed suspiciously by neighbours in the city, forced out due to lack of money, clean an unusable, broken state of a house by her ownself, planting vegetables by herself even when she doesn't know any basic of it, is poignantly everlasting. It’s also fascinating; and pretty queer to see the (un)usual tropes of parenting — the difficulty of letting go, the worry about whether your children will find their place in the world — transferred to a situation where your child’s wolf nature is part of the discussion. In this upbeat era, this practices have been largely abandoned. Hana manifested forbearance under every provocations and strains; by smiling. "phony smile" as Grandpa called it. and this feature of hers is the one we hardly ever can practice in the real life, for we are accustomed to control emotions, and be controlled by it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Kelly

    4/5 Stars: ‘Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki’ by Mamoru Hosoda. → Age Range: Young Adult. → Genre: Fantasy, Light Novel. → Trigger Warnings: Death, Violence, Drowning. In-depth Rating: → Plot: ★★★★ → Character Development: ★★★ → Setting: ★★★★ → Entertainment Level: ★★★★ → Writing: ★★★ General Comments: An odd story told in a one-of-a-kind style that feels equal parts sentimental, sombre and strange; addressing concerns with pressing social issues and the messy emotions of actual human-beings. Despite brief prob 4/5 Stars: ‘Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki’ by Mamoru Hosoda. → Age Range: Young Adult. → Genre: Fantasy, Light Novel. → Trigger Warnings: Death, Violence, Drowning. In-depth Rating: → Plot: ★★★★ → Character Development: ★★★ → Setting: ★★★★ → Entertainment Level: ★★★★ → Writing: ★★★ General Comments: An odd story told in a one-of-a-kind style that feels equal parts sentimental, sombre and strange; addressing concerns with pressing social issues and the messy emotions of actual human-beings. Despite brief problematic content and an ambiguous climax, the plot is magic. A story of single Motherhood and children choosing their paths in life; versatile story-telling in a perfectly balanced way. Favourite Quote: ‘I have lived knowing nothing of the forest so there is nothing I can teach you. Go into the wild. Know the world.’ Time Read: Five Days. → Audiobook: No. → Audiobook Narrator: -

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I was crying so hard at the end of this book. It’s amazing. I was so caught up in everything from the start. It has been a while since a story has captured me in such a way. I loved living in the world this book created for me, even if it hurt sometimes. Hana and Yuki and Ame are beautifully written and all have their own charms as well as things they must overcome. Even though I had a feeling of how it would end, it shattered my heart all the same. Bittersweet doesn’t even begin to cover it, bu I was crying so hard at the end of this book. It’s amazing. I was so caught up in everything from the start. It has been a while since a story has captured me in such a way. I loved living in the world this book created for me, even if it hurt sometimes. Hana and Yuki and Ame are beautifully written and all have their own charms as well as things they must overcome. Even though I had a feeling of how it would end, it shattered my heart all the same. Bittersweet doesn’t even begin to cover it, but I love Hana’s perspective on it. This is my new favorite book I’ve ever read. It is magical and evocative and full of so much heart and soul. There are also some strong environmental overtones that really resonated with me. I love this so, so much. I can’t wait to watch the anime with my husband.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nhi B Yen

    Một tác phẩm về tình mẫu tử đầy thiêng liêng và cao đẹp, lúc kì ảo, khi nhẹ nhàng nhưng vẫn đủ để đem tới cho người đọc những cảm xúc bồi hồi và đầy sâu lắng. Bằng những hình ảnh miêu tả chi tiết, người đọc như được chứng kiến một thước phim về cả cuộc đời một người phụ nữ, hay cụ thể hơn là của Hana - vợ một người sói - chỉ trong hơn 200 trang truyện. Wolf children thật sự đã để lại cho mình nhiều suy ngẫm về đức hi sinh, về con người, về cách con người nhìn nhận và đánh giá những hiện tượng nằ Một tác phẩm về tình mẫu tử đầy thiêng liêng và cao đẹp, lúc kì ảo, khi nhẹ nhàng nhưng vẫn đủ để đem tới cho người đọc những cảm xúc bồi hồi và đầy sâu lắng. Bằng những hình ảnh miêu tả chi tiết, người đọc như được chứng kiến một thước phim về cả cuộc đời một người phụ nữ, hay cụ thể hơn là của Hana - vợ một người sói - chỉ trong hơn 200 trang truyện. Wolf children thật sự đã để lại cho mình nhiều suy ngẫm về đức hi sinh, về con người, về cách con người nhìn nhận và đánh giá những hiện tượng nằm ngoài vùng của bản thân. Vậy nên tội gì không rate 5🎖 nhỉ! Last but not least, thanks to tstt for recommending me such a wonderful novel.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Vazquez

    first of all i simply loved the movie it is one of my all time favorites and it never fails to make me cry. And the light novel did the same it was a heart wrenching story i had to catch myself and not cry. i love Hana, she is such a strong mother she is so selfless for her children and she tries so hard for them and give them a life that gives them the freedom they need. Its a beautiful story of motherhood, family, and her children having to come to terms and figure out what path to take in the first of all i simply loved the movie it is one of my all time favorites and it never fails to make me cry. And the light novel did the same it was a heart wrenching story i had to catch myself and not cry. i love Hana, she is such a strong mother she is so selfless for her children and she tries so hard for them and give them a life that gives them the freedom they need. Its a beautiful story of motherhood, family, and her children having to come to terms and figure out what path to take in their life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Belyea

    Hana falls for a man attending her college classes who soon reveals himself as a wolfman, leaving the fate of their children, Yuki and Ame, a mystery - but when tragedy strikes, she moves her family into the countryside, hoping to offer them the freedom to choose the world of man or animal. Hosoda will appease literary fans of his acclaimed anime film with this short but sweet rendition, hiccupping on the occasion but boasting a simplistic beauty and charm. There is nothing Hana won't do to make Hana falls for a man attending her college classes who soon reveals himself as a wolfman, leaving the fate of their children, Yuki and Ame, a mystery - but when tragedy strikes, she moves her family into the countryside, hoping to offer them the freedom to choose the world of man or animal. Hosoda will appease literary fans of his acclaimed anime film with this short but sweet rendition, hiccupping on the occasion but boasting a simplistic beauty and charm. There is nothing Hana won't do to make the world a little bit better for her children and the secret they must bear...

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is pretty bad. Fortunately, it is also quite brief. There isn’t a whole lot of plot here. Any mildly significant event is followed by an abrupt time leap where no consequences result. It is also very obvious that the author has no idea what rearing a child is like based on the frequently reckless behavior by Hana. While this doesn’t suffer as much from the stilted and repetitive writing style of most light novels it is still rather clumsy. Stick to the anime for this one...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela Auten

    I loved this version! I loved that it went into more detail about what the characters were thinking! Full review to come...or read my manga review here! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... I loved this version! I loved that it went into more detail about what the characters were thinking! Full review to come...or read my manga review here! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Carmack

    Such a powerful story. We are looking to show this movie at my library and my boss wanted to make sure that it would be good. So, I got the book for her to read and had to read it myself. I love the movie and it is so touching!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jose Santamaria

    This is hart warming book , love and i love the art

  17. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    If I had any complaint it would be that it went to fast. A great story of acceptance and coming of age.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lia

    It just like the movie but in book form

  19. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I think the story is really beautifully portrayed as a movie, and maybe it's because the book came after the movie, but it lacks some of the power it did as an animation. I think the story is really beautifully portrayed as a movie, and maybe it's because the book came after the movie, but it lacks some of the power it did as an animation.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Garland

    Really good book. Would definitely recommend this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Read for Transfiguration Prompt for O.W.L.s Magical Readathon 2020 (Animagus lecture: book/series that includes shapeshifting). Watched the original anime film that inspired this light novel way back. I think the feelings are conveyed more effectively in the film rather than here but it is still a very pleasant read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nghi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Hickman

  25. 5 out of 5

    Creativeimaginator

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ana J

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Nguyen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Connie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Smriti

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paige Timmerman

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