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To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence

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The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call for the American pub The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call for the American public and also a guide for how our country can do a better job of protecting its national security and trade secrets. Olson takes the reader into the arcane world of counterintelligence as he lived it during his thirty-year career in the CIA. After an overview of what the Chinese, Russian, and Cuban spy services are doing to the United States, Olson explains the nitty-gritty of the principles and methods of counterintelligence. Readers will learn about specific aspects of counterintelligence such as running double-agent operations and surveillance. The book also analyzes twelve actual case studies to illustrate why people spy against their country, the tradecraft of counterintelligence, and where counterintelligence breaks down or succeeds. A "lessons learned" section follows each case study.


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The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call for the American pub The United States is losing the counterintelligence war. Foreign intelligence services, particularly those of China, Russia, and Cuba, are recruiting spies in our midst and stealing our secrets and cutting-edge technologies. In To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, James M. Olson, former chief of CIA counterintelligence, offers a wake-up call for the American public and also a guide for how our country can do a better job of protecting its national security and trade secrets. Olson takes the reader into the arcane world of counterintelligence as he lived it during his thirty-year career in the CIA. After an overview of what the Chinese, Russian, and Cuban spy services are doing to the United States, Olson explains the nitty-gritty of the principles and methods of counterintelligence. Readers will learn about specific aspects of counterintelligence such as running double-agent operations and surveillance. The book also analyzes twelve actual case studies to illustrate why people spy against their country, the tradecraft of counterintelligence, and where counterintelligence breaks down or succeeds. A "lessons learned" section follows each case study.

30 review for To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Olson provides an engaging overview of counterintelligence (CI) that will engage people interested in intelligence generally or CI specifically. Unfortunately, it falls short of its ambitions of defining an "art of counterintelligence" and mostly reviews general knowledge and cases that area already in the intelligence literature and will be familiar to people who have read more detailed accounts of specific CI cases. Unfortunately, Olson's title highlights the need for a general book on counteri Olson provides an engaging overview of counterintelligence (CI) that will engage people interested in intelligence generally or CI specifically. Unfortunately, it falls short of its ambitions of defining an "art of counterintelligence" and mostly reviews general knowledge and cases that area already in the intelligence literature and will be familiar to people who have read more detailed accounts of specific CI cases. Unfortunately, Olson's title highlights the need for a general book on counterintelligence to complement the several books on general intelligence, but this book falls far short of its potential. This is particularly disappointing given Olson's 30 years of experience in the CIA and current status as a professor of the practice at the Bush School. This book provides a chapter each on China, Russia, and Cuba counterintelligence operations before chapters on the ten principles of CI, CI awareness in the workplace, and double agent operations. Olson finishes with several case studies of specific counterintelligence cases, but there is little new insight in the short summaries of these cases. Instead of an "art of counterintelligence," the book feels more like war stories with a CI expert. This book would have been better if Olson had provided an overview of the US intelligence community and the intelligence cycle, which is covered in other books and unclassified government documents. He should have then talked about a general theory of CI as it applies to all countries as their CI agents seek to identify and mitigate foreign intelligence agents. He should have then presented specific chapters on different aspects of CI operations, such as identifying foreign intelligence officers (both those under official and nonofficial cover), how they recruit sources, how they satisfy requirements, running double agents, mitigating risk, etc. Indeed, a major gap in this book on CI is a very thin discussion on identifying foreign intelligence officers and mitigating their ability to operate, a gap which makes the chapter on double agents less relevant than it would have been with a more complete discussion. Lastly, Olson could have provided several chapters on comparative CI between different countries. By not providing a general theory on CI Olson exposes himself to many contradictions that ultimately weaken the overall message of this book and limit its usefulness to practitioners, policymakers, and the general public. One contradiction is how Olson describes US and foreign CI services. He asks the reader to be shocked that the intelligence services of Russia, China, Cuba, and other countries have infiltrated the American government offices, universities, and companies, but take it for granted that the US runs intelligence operations in those countries trying to do, in essence, the same thing (satisfy requirements). If he had established a framework of how countries satisfy intelligence requirements (whether they do it professionally, as in the US, or in an adhoc manner), it would have been clear that, fundamentally, the US and other countries are interested in the same basic goal of satisfying these requirements. This framework would have provided a natural lead-in to a discussion on the ethics of intelligence and counterintelligence. Of course, to engage in the recruitment of sources an individual must be willing to lie and deceive their family, friends, and sources, but where does one draw the line? Are there ethical boundaries that one can cross in an investigation that seeks to prevent an imminent attack versus an operation to satisfy a general intelligence requirement? Olson should have talked about how other countries engage in commercial espionage, such as China, or cyber-terrorism, such as North Korea's Sony hack and how the US's professional intelligence services stay away from these types of operations. One critical flaw of Olson's work is that he seems to rely heavily on a small subset of well-known examples of CI cases. Instead of retell the story of Aldrich Ames, he should have researched federal indictments and newspaper articles, perhaps even from foreign countries, to attempt to bring new CI cases to the broader public attention. Olson also fails to address several of the dilemmas that arise in his discussion. He calls for the intelligence community to take stricter stances on drugs and alcohol, but does not take the opportunity to address what a nuanced program would look like when many states have legalized or decriminalized drugs and binge drinking is as common in college as writing term papers at the last minute. Also, the intelligence community, including the military, has thousands of positions to fill every year. If the standards on drugs and minor infractions were too strict, it would be impossible to fill every open position. Olson could have done current administrators a service by thinking more deeply about these serious issues. Olson also fails to address that much of what happens in the CI world is not publicly known either because it is highly classified, or the intelligence community failed to identify the foreign intelligence officer or their American agent. Although many cases have certainly not been declassified, the reader does not know if the cases presented in this book are a representative sample of CI cases. Also, Olson does not address the glaring possibility that the only people caught in CI operations were the dumb ones, and that the smart ones all got away with it. Olson gives us the Pollard case, and others, with inept spies who cannot help but brag to their friends about their adventures while flaunting their newfound prosperity, but is it possible that there have been Americans in the intelligence community who have spied for years and gotten away with it? Olson missed the opportunity to explain exactly why Cuba was so successful, which is especially disappointing considering Malcolm Gladwell's most recent book did such a good job. This book, published in July 2019, also should have provided the opportunity for an expert like Olson to address modern dilemmas of hunting down foreign spies. With hundreds of thousands of foreign students and professional workers in the US, how can the US get a handle on identifying spies and agents without violating individual rights? With some universities reluctant to work with law enforcement in the absence of clear and convincing evidence and companies averse to highlighting security lapses, how can CI professionals best communicate the essential role they play for the country to the general public to ensure that they receive the tips from private citizens they need to do their job? How can the CIA and FBI convince companies that it is more important to report security lapses of critical national security information than to protect their reputation? Considering these, and other flaws, most readers would do well to read other books about intelligence and counterintelligence. Despite this, there are enough interesting anecdotes to make this book worthwhile for somebody who has read several books on this and related subjects. One place to start would be the appendix, where Olson lists several books on CI, before coming back to this one. On the upside, there is still an opportunity for a retired CI officer or an aspiring academic to write the authoritative book on CI in the 21st Century.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    This book was written by the former chief of CIA counterintelligence and was hard to put down at times. The author begins by unveiling some of the United States biggest intelligence threats such as China, Russia, and Cuba. Olson then gives his Ten Commandments of counterintelligence and walks through how to run and manage successful double agent operations. The last half of the book details a number of case studies of defectors, traitors, and double agents working against the the US on behalf of This book was written by the former chief of CIA counterintelligence and was hard to put down at times. The author begins by unveiling some of the United States biggest intelligence threats such as China, Russia, and Cuba. Olson then gives his Ten Commandments of counterintelligence and walks through how to run and manage successful double agent operations. The last half of the book details a number of case studies of defectors, traitors, and double agents working against the the US on behalf of other nations. He concludes each section going through what happened and how it could have been avoided.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    Mixed feelings. The book felt a little self-indulgent. Just a little. But kind of deserved. The guy did important and interesting work. And he made a point that feels right, namely that Chinese industrial and technological espionage is a threat Americans should take more seriously. But I felt as if he hailed from an America it was a little easier to be proud of.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    This is an excellent work for anyone (from CI professionals to “armchair agents”) to learn from and enjoy. This book is very engaging and accessible with its numerous case studies. James Olson is the real deal. He has first hand experience with his years in the CIA and is incredibly knowledgeable in the craft of counterintelligence. This is a must read for any spy story enthusiast.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Davis

    To Catch a Spy, by James M. Olson; Georgetown University Press: Washington, DC; $26.95 hardback It seems counterintelligence (CI) is in the news every day now. James M. Olson, former Chief of Counterintelligence for the Central Intelligence Agency, helps make CI understandable. Indeed, he does so while placing its role in the context of secret world events happening now. Olson is concise, clear, and helpful in his presentation. A long time clandestine operative of the CIA before his CI assignmen To Catch a Spy, by James M. Olson; Georgetown University Press: Washington, DC; $26.95 hardback It seems counterintelligence (CI) is in the news every day now. James M. Olson, former Chief of Counterintelligence for the Central Intelligence Agency, helps make CI understandable. Indeed, he does so while placing its role in the context of secret world events happening now. Olson is concise, clear, and helpful in his presentation. A long time clandestine operative of the CIA before his CI assignment, he now teaches at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M. He draws on a lifetime of experience to explain what counterintelligence does, to whom, and why. CI is there to identify, counter, and defeat adversarial spies. CI people are ‘spy catchers’, for want of a summation. Olson begins with an overview of how adversarial nations attempt to undermine ours. We read of Chinese attempts to use educational exchanges for espionage. Russia has always been known for its attempts to infiltrate and thus influence American activities, either through embassy spies, technology, or even worse, illegals. The latter are people who live secretly among us, but work directly for Russia. Then, surprisingly, there is Cuba, whose intelligence agency is identified as completely professional, and ‘punching above its weight’ in world affairs. All nations spy, only some are more dangerous than others. Mr. Olson then identifies 10 ‘Commandments’ of counterintelligence. Summarized, these valuable guidelines will ground a potential CI agent in the context of his profession. He’ll understand the history of espionage, how it impacts his mission to deter the threat, while at the same time insuring he knows what must be done to remain current and effective. This chapter alone is worth the price of the book. Olson takes the ancient Chinese military philosopher Sun Tsu to heart as he shows us how to ‘know your enemy’. We learn about ‘double agents’, surveillances, and are given hints about the whole new world of computer counterintelligence. What the reader will find of value are the case studies of actual spies written about ‘in depth’. This means, we’ll know about these espionage cases in as much detail as possible, for Olson clearly indicates where his study had to be circumscribed due to classification considerations. We learn of spy cases from Anna Montes who spied for Cuba, to the 10 Russian ‘sleeper’ agents placed in America under false identifies, the better to infiltrate our national organizations. We learn of Larry Wu-Tai Chin, a spy for China whose recruitment is a puzzle. So much of the role of counterintelligence is covered in these studies you’ll understand what it does by how it works. You’ll also see where some pre-employment interviews failed to identify security risks, where the polygraph worked, or not, and a host of other methods. After concluding this book, you’ll know what a rich field of reading awaits you in the now understandable world of counterintelligence.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fernando

    Jim Olson's years of experience in Counterintelligence at the CIA have served him well to write this insightful book about the CI profession. His initial review of the threats China, Russia and Cuba pose to the US -and, certainly, to our Western lifestyle- is a good introductory analysis to those interested in CI and how intelligence services other than the CIA operate. Chapters 4 to 7 provide the reader with knowledge that, until now, only the fortunate students at the Bush School of Government Jim Olson's years of experience in Counterintelligence at the CIA have served him well to write this insightful book about the CI profession. His initial review of the threats China, Russia and Cuba pose to the US -and, certainly, to our Western lifestyle- is a good introductory analysis to those interested in CI and how intelligence services other than the CIA operate. Chapters 4 to 7 provide the reader with knowledge that, until now, only the fortunate students at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M have been able to reach. Especially notable are Olson's own 'Ten Commandments of Counterintelligence' -reviewed in depth in this book- and his 'Three Principles of Workplace Counterintelligence.' His passion for Double-Agent Operations and how to manage them (chapters 6 & 7) serves the neophyte reader in Intelligence studies to begin to grasp one of the most exciting type of CI operations. He crafts a good definition of Double-Agent and provides useful examples to understand what Double-Agent operations are and the advantages that come from conducting these operations against enemy intelligence services. Finally, chapter 8 is rich in relevant and varied CI case studies that will teach future CI professionals a good lesson on how to avoid traitors within the intelligence agencies if Olson's 'Ten Commandments of Counterintelligence' and the 'Three Principles of Workplace Counterintelligence' are observed. This book is populated with Olson's own experiences and thoughts on the tradecraft, all told in a fluid narrative style and with a powerful voice. To Catch a Spy is bound to become an essential reading on Counterintelligence that all intelligence professional must add to their personal bookshelves.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    Each chapter and part starts with a quote. The first chapter talks about how China is responsible for many things, ones we always blame the Russians for. For example China has been meddling with our politics on all sides since 2000. It is fascinating to know just how deep some of the counterintelligence is. What I really like is how current this book is, so he talks about information from the 1950s through something like 2017 Even after the Cold War, the KGB and the CIA did not get along. It is fl Each chapter and part starts with a quote. The first chapter talks about how China is responsible for many things, ones we always blame the Russians for. For example China has been meddling with our politics on all sides since 2000. It is fascinating to know just how deep some of the counterintelligence is. What I really like is how current this book is, so he talks about information from the 1950s through something like 2017 Even after the Cold War, the KGB and the CIA did not get along. It is flabbergasting how intense Russian spies and espionage under Putin are. Olson learned of his own interactions with a number of people whether they were spies for us or for others. The reader therefore learns of some of his former colleagues He talks about ways in which spies were determined, found, and prosecuted. It is interesting that he notes that China’s spying is impersonal whereas Russia’s is personal because they don’t like us (OK it’s more than that, but that’s what I took from it/ He considers Cuba to be the third most dangerous threat but the first most obnoxious. I had to laugh at that. Olson’s 10 Commandments about counterintelligence are interesting. I totally agree that drug and alcohol abuse, and major crimes, should screen out applicants. It’s scary that it doesn’t. There is great info on double agents and their benefits. I really like the case studies on catching spies against the US, and what we have learned from them. There is a great annotated reading list at the end.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ted Tyler

    Counterintelligence (CI) is FASCINATING. CI is the activity undertaken to protect an agency's own intelligence services from opposition agencies. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the theory and the practice of CI. The first third of the book is basic theory and Olson's "Ten Commandments of CI", while the second two-thirds of the book focuses on specific CI case studies. These case studies focus on Americans who spied for the Soviet Union, China, Israel, and Cuba. Each case study provides back Counterintelligence (CI) is FASCINATING. CI is the activity undertaken to protect an agency's own intelligence services from opposition agencies. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the theory and the practice of CI. The first third of the book is basic theory and Olson's "Ten Commandments of CI", while the second two-thirds of the book focuses on specific CI case studies. These case studies focus on Americans who spied for the Soviet Union, China, Israel, and Cuba. Each case study provides background information into why/how each American defected, the nature of their transgressions, how they were caught, and then what "commandments" were upheld or neglected. I was shocked to learn how powerful Cuban CI capabilities are. With a small budget, the Cuban Intelligence Directorate is a FORCE to be reckoned with. They have proven to be very effective, and I shudder to think how much more damage they could do with a budget of scale. China's willingness to sit on counterintelligence assets was not surprising, but it's amazing how some assets were able to pass information for decades and the patience involved to collect it all. Very entertaining and you won't be able to put it down!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Langert

    Author James Olson is highly qualified to teach a general reader like me the art of counterintelligence. While he does provide the Ten Commandments of counterintelligence, principles CI agents should live by, much of the book focused on CI mistakes and failures. Also, the book starts by touting the strength of CI work by China, Russia and Cuba. You get the impression that the United States has inferior CI efforts in the CIA, FBI and the military by reading this book. The author says the it is dif Author James Olson is highly qualified to teach a general reader like me the art of counterintelligence. While he does provide the Ten Commandments of counterintelligence, principles CI agents should live by, much of the book focused on CI mistakes and failures. Also, the book starts by touting the strength of CI work by China, Russia and Cuba. You get the impression that the United States has inferior CI efforts in the CIA, FBI and the military by reading this book. The author says the it is difficult to attract people into CI work, that often federal agencies settle for mediocre people to fill those roles. The author says that is history, hoping now that he is a college professor, that this is no longer true. This reads like a textbook, pretty dry at times. Many of the points made by the author are made repeatedly. I wanted to learn something about CI, but I didn’t get out of this as much as I had hoped. I would rather have seen the author spend more time on successful CI than failed CI.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Viktoria

    The casual conversational tone undermines the authority of this book. Compared to other books on this topic the author’s decision to take everything personally and use argumentative language further give the appearance of bias. Had it been mostly about cases the author worked I might be more forgiving but all of the information is available in other books devoted to each specific agent, so nothing new is included. Some simple terminology mistakes (illegals = no diplomatic cover) meant that if th The casual conversational tone undermines the authority of this book. Compared to other books on this topic the author’s decision to take everything personally and use argumentative language further give the appearance of bias. Had it been mostly about cases the author worked I might be more forgiving but all of the information is available in other books devoted to each specific agent, so nothing new is included. Some simple terminology mistakes (illegals = no diplomatic cover) meant that if this book had been any longer I would have quit it. I think if you want a book All About Amerika’s Evil enemies’ plots!! this is the book for you. If you wanted an examination of American tradecraft, successes and failures of American counterintelligence this is not the book for you. I particularly took issue with the continual argument for use of a polygraph despite many of the "case studies" in the book passed a polygraph, each of which is dismissed by the author, as is the high rate of false positives.

  11. 5 out of 5

    catechism

    this is very AMERICA FUCK YEAH, which to some extent is to be expected, but it meant that much of the book was not credible. It was unclear to me why I should be shocked -- shocked!! -- by what Russia and China are doing when we're doing the exact same thing, unless I am to think only America is allowed to spy? I also was turned off by Olson going on and on about how stupid/fat/slovenly/drunk/drugged-out/left-wing many of the caught spies were, first for the obvious reasons (who gives a shit if this is very AMERICA FUCK YEAH, which to some extent is to be expected, but it meant that much of the book was not credible. It was unclear to me why I should be shocked -- shocked!! -- by what Russia and China are doing when we're doing the exact same thing, unless I am to think only America is allowed to spy? I also was turned off by Olson going on and on about how stupid/fat/slovenly/drunk/drugged-out/left-wing many of the caught spies were, first for the obvious reasons (who gives a shit if the guy was ugly?????) but secondly because if all the spies they caught were caught because they were inept Keystone Kops of the intelligence world.... are there no smart good spies that have not been caught? It just left some very weird holes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    G.

    This book functions as a primer on US oriented counter-intelligence for the general reader. It introduces general intelligence concepts, but as the title suggests, focuses primarily on the various ways foreign agents are detected and handled. One of the most useful sections is an annotated list of recommended reading of books about the history of intelligence organizations, both US and foreign. The list has a particularly strong collection of books that pertain to the KGB of the former Soviet Un This book functions as a primer on US oriented counter-intelligence for the general reader. It introduces general intelligence concepts, but as the title suggests, focuses primarily on the various ways foreign agents are detected and handled. One of the most useful sections is an annotated list of recommended reading of books about the history of intelligence organizations, both US and foreign. The list has a particularly strong collection of books that pertain to the KGB of the former Soviet Union, but it includes titles that also focus on China or other countries that pose significant intelligence threats to the United States.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Naim Peress

    This is a good book about the craft and need for counterintelligence. The author James Olsen does a great job of discussing the threats to the U.S. and how we can counter them. Through stories of American traitors, he illustrates what he calls the Ten Commandments of counterintelligence. Olsen provides us with a necessary warning and how-to guide on defending America from the threats of foreign spying. Worth reading for those interested in the subject.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Case Officer Olson’s “To Catch a Spy” resonates well. A very well written Counterintelligence book. I’m thinking the review editing may have been more significant than Olson explains, though I doubt we will really ever know. Great list of recommended additional reading of a more recent vintage. Recommend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    James M. Olson explains the purpose of counter intelligence and the important role counter intelligence professionals play in protecting America. Olson provides interesting perspectives on global matters as well as individual relationships among professionals. I would absolutely recommend this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dave Estela

    If you're interested in spycraft, this is the book for you. Very interesting read detailing the various exploits of recent U.S. traitors who were caught spying for other countries. The author also describes the actions taken by CI professionals to weed these despicable people out before they can do serious damage to the U.S. If you're interested in spycraft, this is the book for you. Very interesting read detailing the various exploits of recent U.S. traitors who were caught spying for other countries. The author also describes the actions taken by CI professionals to weed these despicable people out before they can do serious damage to the U.S.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Womble

    Dry stuff. Not as interesting as it could have been. The author starts with a warning that the CCP is all over American intelligence. But doesn't describe how or why. Worse: no real solutions are provided. Instead, we get a written PowerPoint presentation, presumably designed for Counterintelligence trainees. Miss. Dry stuff. Not as interesting as it could have been. The author starts with a warning that the CCP is all over American intelligence. But doesn't describe how or why. Worse: no real solutions are provided. Instead, we get a written PowerPoint presentation, presumably designed for Counterintelligence trainees. Miss.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Lane

    I read this book for research purposes - to become familiar with espionage and counterespionage. What better way to learn than to read a book written by a former CIA person, James Olson, who was there! This book is not for the reader who wants a spy thriller. This one is for people who want the real account of the art of counterintelligence.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Todd Cheng

    A good entry into the history and culture of espionage. He covers the threats and impacts of Russia, China, and Cuba. He uses a framework of case studies and his own experience to weave a great background of both successes and failures of a long history international intel.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    A bit like and exhaustive briefing but for sure concise. Would be fun to sit in on one of the authors classes if he’s still teaching at Texas A&M and if anyone’s child goes to A&M and has a career planned in technology or computers would strongly recommend a class to the author.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Scott

    Interesting but a little repetitive The chapters and case studies were an interested read, but towards the end of the book the “lessons learned” were rather repetitive. We need better workplace counterintelligence, more polygraphs, and more resources.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Abi-Hanna

    Amazing in every way. I could not recommend it more highly.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve Heil

    I enjoyed it. A good overview of counterintelligence with case studies. Not very deep, but still an entertaining and informative freshman-level course on counterintelligence.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Interesting information but not the greatest read. I wanted to quit early on but it gets better when you get to individual people.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    3.5 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Goddardcc

    The first three chapters were fascinating as were the case studies in the last chapter. The middle was a little slow.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Kaminski

    Great content but kinda hard to read

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meatwadmammie

    Case studies of CI operatives Interesting review of some of the cases of discovered counter intelligence against the United States. Great training source for CIA case officers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Goldie

    Well done overview, interesting analysis of case histories, great reading list. I wanted more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Christiansen

    A solid read. Interesting perspective on counterintelligence.

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