Hot Best Seller

Writing Horror and the Body: The Fiction of Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Anne Rice

Availability: Ready to download

In this sequel to Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic, Badley examines horror fiction as a fantastic genre in which images of the body and the self are articulated and modified. Badley places horror fiction in its cultural context, drawing important connections to theories of gender and sexuality. As our culture places increasing importance on body image, horror fiction h In this sequel to Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic, Badley examines horror fiction as a fantastic genre in which images of the body and the self are articulated and modified. Badley places horror fiction in its cultural context, drawing important connections to theories of gender and sexuality. As our culture places increasing importance on body image, horror fiction has provided a language for imagining the self in new ways--often as ungendered, transformed, or re-generated. Focusing on the works of Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Anne Rice, Badley approaches horror as a discourse that articulates the anxieties of our culture.


Compare

In this sequel to Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic, Badley examines horror fiction as a fantastic genre in which images of the body and the self are articulated and modified. Badley places horror fiction in its cultural context, drawing important connections to theories of gender and sexuality. As our culture places increasing importance on body image, horror fiction h In this sequel to Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic, Badley examines horror fiction as a fantastic genre in which images of the body and the self are articulated and modified. Badley places horror fiction in its cultural context, drawing important connections to theories of gender and sexuality. As our culture places increasing importance on body image, horror fiction has provided a language for imagining the self in new ways--often as ungendered, transformed, or re-generated. Focusing on the works of Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Anne Rice, Badley approaches horror as a discourse that articulates the anxieties of our culture.

30 review for Writing Horror and the Body: The Fiction of Stephen King, Clive Barker, and Anne Rice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    Badley takes a close look at the work of three of the best known horror writers, Stephen King, Clive Barker, Anne Rice, and examines the manner in which the three writers represent the body, physical violence, and gender construction in their work. Much of Badley's analysis deals with gender, sexuality, and feminism theory, which she uses to examine how these three writers deal with such issues and how their work reinforces or contradicts gender and sexual norms. Some might argue that Badley's di Badley takes a close look at the work of three of the best known horror writers, Stephen King, Clive Barker, Anne Rice, and examines the manner in which the three writers represent the body, physical violence, and gender construction in their work. Much of Badley's analysis deals with gender, sexuality, and feminism theory, which she uses to examine how these three writers deal with such issues and how their work reinforces or contradicts gender and sexual norms. Some might argue that Badley's discussion over intellectualizes the work of the three writers that she focuses on, but I would disagree. I thought that Badley's discussion was eye opening, important, and despite its academic tone, rather straightforward and well organized.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    It was not the book I thought it was. More for an English major or Psychology major for viewpoint of Horror/Gothic novels. Does not give much help with "How to" write horror, except for the underlying research information needed for the genre by examining the works of Stephen King, Clive Barker and Anne Rice. I am not completely done reading it at the moment, but this is my review overall so far. I plan to finish the book because Ms. Badley does have some good info on the reviews she's done. It was not the book I thought it was. More for an English major or Psychology major for viewpoint of Horror/Gothic novels. Does not give much help with "How to" write horror, except for the underlying research information needed for the genre by examining the works of Stephen King, Clive Barker and Anne Rice. I am not completely done reading it at the moment, but this is my review overall so far. I plan to finish the book because Ms. Badley does have some good info on the reviews she's done.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Μάριος Καρακατσάνης

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen S.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tina Rooker

  6. 4 out of 5

    Donald

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kaci

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paget

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Ervin

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

  11. 5 out of 5

    Decadent Sympozium

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jasmien Vanderstraeten

  13. 5 out of 5

    Teodora

  14. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Lake Publishing

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tellie Simmons

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jolene Brown

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Hill

  18. 5 out of 5

    Darren Mitton

  19. 4 out of 5

    Borja Vargas

  20. 4 out of 5

    May Agana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Debjani

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jade Vedder-Ditchett

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mistalyn M

  24. 4 out of 5

    Humairah Revalini

  25. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christina Clark

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

  29. 4 out of 5

    ♥Eliza Marie♥ Goco

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...