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Write Better: A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality

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Writing is not easy. But it can get better. In this primer on nonfiction writing, Andrew Le Peau offers insights he has learned as a published author and an editor for over forty years, training, guiding, and cheering on hundreds of writers. Here are skills that writers can master--from finding strong openings and closings, to focusing on an audience, to creating a clear s Writing is not easy. But it can get better. In this primer on nonfiction writing, Andrew Le Peau offers insights he has learned as a published author and an editor for over forty years, training, guiding, and cheering on hundreds of writers. Here are skills that writers can master--from finding strong openings and closings, to focusing on an audience, to creating a clear structure, to crafting a persuasive message. With wide-ranging examples from fiction and nonfiction, Le Peau also demystifies aspects of art in writing such as creativity, tone, and metaphor. He considers strategies that can move writers toward fresher, more vital, and perhaps more beautiful expressions of the human condition. One aspect of writing that rarely receives attention is who we are as writers and how writing itself changes us. Self-doubt, fear of criticism, downsides of success, questions of authority, and finding our voice are all a part of the exploration of our spirituality as writers found in these pages. Discover how the act of writing can affect our life in God. Whether you're a veteran writer, an occasional practitioner, a publishing professional, or a student just starting to explore such skills, Le Peau's wit and wisdom can speed you on your way.


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Writing is not easy. But it can get better. In this primer on nonfiction writing, Andrew Le Peau offers insights he has learned as a published author and an editor for over forty years, training, guiding, and cheering on hundreds of writers. Here are skills that writers can master--from finding strong openings and closings, to focusing on an audience, to creating a clear s Writing is not easy. But it can get better. In this primer on nonfiction writing, Andrew Le Peau offers insights he has learned as a published author and an editor for over forty years, training, guiding, and cheering on hundreds of writers. Here are skills that writers can master--from finding strong openings and closings, to focusing on an audience, to creating a clear structure, to crafting a persuasive message. With wide-ranging examples from fiction and nonfiction, Le Peau also demystifies aspects of art in writing such as creativity, tone, and metaphor. He considers strategies that can move writers toward fresher, more vital, and perhaps more beautiful expressions of the human condition. One aspect of writing that rarely receives attention is who we are as writers and how writing itself changes us. Self-doubt, fear of criticism, downsides of success, questions of authority, and finding our voice are all a part of the exploration of our spirituality as writers found in these pages. Discover how the act of writing can affect our life in God. Whether you're a veteran writer, an occasional practitioner, a publishing professional, or a student just starting to explore such skills, Le Peau's wit and wisdom can speed you on your way.

30 review for Write Better: A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality

  1. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Excellent. I’m a reader, not a writer and for good reason; I love reading and (usually) dislike writing. And yet, writing is a very useful skill—hence the need for books like this. Mr. Peau teaches many useful skills in Write Better, most of which I know, and also know I need to know – but don’t like to be – reminded of. For the most part, there was little new or that I did not disagree with. I read his Chapter, Less is More because I know that is a particular fault of mine. My husband and child Excellent. I’m a reader, not a writer and for good reason; I love reading and (usually) dislike writing. And yet, writing is a very useful skill—hence the need for books like this. Mr. Peau teaches many useful skills in Write Better, most of which I know, and also know I need to know – but don’t like to be – reminded of. For the most part, there was little new or that I did not disagree with. I read his Chapter, Less is More because I know that is a particular fault of mine. My husband and children tell me all the time that I repeat myself. I tell them, so did Jesus. Repetition is for emphasis, remembrance and depth. However, in my case, it is also a crutch, so, booklady, less is more and enough is as good as a feast. Well worth your while! And thanks to all the eyes and ears who have had to endure TMB – too much booklady. For the record, I will keep this book nearby as a very handy reference. Thanks again Alex for the heads up! March 11, 2020: Have many how-to-write books around the house and have only glanced at most of them. I have NO aspirations (anymore*) to BE a writer, only to write a little better each time I write. It was in this vein I purchased this book. Have been dipping into it a little at a time and keep it near my Journal to Jesus. Journaling is in my top 10 goals for 2020 and thanks to the Holy Spirit (and dare I add the quarantine) I have been faithful ever since March. Thanks to my GRs friend Alex for the great review which pointed me toward this book! *When I was young I did want to write stories, now I realize I prefer to read them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    Andrew Le Peau is surely qualified to write a book on writing better: he has been an editor at IVP for forty years. But I hope I’m qualified to say that (most of) the book, though fine, didn’t scratch where I personally itch. His advice for the first two thirds of the book is fairly standard, his examples as well. If you’ve never read such a book, Le Peau will serve you well. If you need to hear, “Reading widely and learning from experienced, educated authorities can be invaluable,” Le Peau will Andrew Le Peau is surely qualified to write a book on writing better: he has been an editor at IVP for forty years. But I hope I’m qualified to say that (most of) the book, though fine, didn’t scratch where I personally itch. His advice for the first two thirds of the book is fairly standard, his examples as well. If you’ve never read such a book, Le Peau will serve you well. If you need to hear, “Reading widely and learning from experienced, educated authorities can be invaluable,” Le Peau will tell you. If you need to hear the “advantage\[s] of presenting the strongest case against your viewpoint,” Le Peau will tell you. If you need to take time to define your audience, he will tell you to do it. If you need to be told to rewrite, same. If you need to be told that the “rules” of grammar don’t come from heaven but are instead human tools, check. If you need to be told that a good title is essential to your book’s success, ditto. (I’m being a little hard on him: the titling section was useful: he did a good job breaking down common contemporary titling practice.) I nearly gave up on this book during those first two sections, because—what am I supposed to say?—I kind of already knew what he was going to say. I’m a writer and an editor, jobs I’ve been doing for my entire adult life. I guess I should be relieved that I received no revelations. ## Why I’m glad I didn’t give up But I’m glad I didn’t give up on *Writing Better*, because the third section, spiritual meta-reflections on the writing life, were full of genuine wisdom for me. Le Peau actually really nailed me: I had a little success with my “first” book, and dealing with the paralysis that comes from praise has been a noticeable internal challenge. My book, to my total and grateful shock, got endorsements from major heroes of mine. It was like LeBron James praising the basketball skills of the second-string point guard at Claremont Elementary. I have many times felt like quitting while I’m ahead. Why stick my neck out again when I have that nice bed of laurels over there to rest on? With my royalty checks, I can take my whole family out to Five Guys Burgers and Fries every six months. Now, where’s a horse and a sunset? Le Peau had the right advice for me, and though I “already knew” this, too, I still needed to hear it and found it truly edifying. He told me that if I love my neighbor and love the truth and am humble before the God who gave me whatever writing gifts and opportunities I have, then I will write again. Le Peau also offered some simple, helpful advice for how to handle criticism. This was aproPeau (cue Jim Gaffigan’s high-pitched self-mockery voice: *Why did he type that?*): “Social media is generally not a good place to try to resolve criticism. Again, people are going to say what they are going to say. You had your say. Let them have theirs. If you have a personal relationship with someone who has said something especially problematic, handle it personally if possible, away from the often-distorting glare of the internet.” (224) Bam. Do that. I’m going to. Le Peau also told me something I’ve never heard and never even thought of: make sure I have a literary executor named in my will. Just one, so my kids don’t have to make a difficult mutual decision over the book manuscript that facilitated so many family nights at Five Guys. I owe him for that wisdom. He also gave a publisher’s view of the current state of book publishing, and a Christian view of how to build a platform without sinning against a Lord who told us not to take the seats of honor at feasts. Good stuff. He also offered advice for how to remain tethered helpfully to authority, lest you discover that your fame or platform has pulled you away from sound doctrine. I hope I never need his wisdom, but I’m glad I have it. Oh, and I liked this quote a lot: “Both fiction and nonfiction can speak truth—and both can lie” (3). ## In sum And so can book reviews. So I hope I’m telling you the truth: this is a good book that needs to find the readers for which it is meant. I was (⅓) and wasn’t (⅔) it. Sometimes I’m a clinical reader, or I pretend to be one. Really, though, I’m an emotional reader. I have ups and downs with books. The first portions of the book were, yeah, kind of flat for me. I was at two stars—just for me personally (I still recommend the whole book for newbies). But the last portion of the book was full of wisdom and a truly Christian spirit. That section pulled me up to three stars total, and not dwarf stars but like medium-sized ones. New and aspiring Christian writers: pick this book up. Work by God’s grace to get to the point where its counsel feels old hat, because it offers wise, practical, Christian advice on how to *Write Better*.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: An experienced writer and editor describes the craft, art, and spirituality of writing well, or at least better. "Writing is hard work. Writing well is even harder. But there are ways not only to make it easier but better. Having spent my whole career as a writer and editor, I offer a book on craft and character for nonfiction writer"  (p. 231). Andrew T. LePeau uses these words as a model of distilling to an "elevator pitch" what his book is about. This summary characterizes what one Summary: An experienced writer and editor describes the craft, art, and spirituality of writing well, or at least better. "Writing is hard work. Writing well is even harder. But there are ways not only to make it easier but better. Having spent my whole career as a writer and editor, I offer a book on craft and character for nonfiction writer"  (p. 231). Andrew T. LePeau uses these words as a model of distilling to an "elevator pitch" what his book is about. This summary characterizes what one will find throughout this work, a skilled writer and editor who shows rather than just tells us how to write better. As a blogger who is also in the midst of a book project, this book was both humbling and a goldmine. The goldmine is the wealth of practical advice on writing well. LePeau focuses on three aspects: craft, art, and spirituality. Craft focuses on titles, openings, closings, and everything that comes in between. He proposes when we open that we start writing, and then go back and throw out the first three paragraphs, by which time we've figured out what to say! He talks about structure while proposing that we scrap outlines because we often don't know what we want to say until we start saying it. He discusses persuasion, and how to do this with integrity. He emphasizes the importance of story in writing dramatic non-fiction. He offers advice for overcoming writers block. He would affirm that "[t]here's no such thing as good writing. "There's only good rewriting." Then he shows us how to do it. LePeau begins his discussion of the art of writing with a chapter on creativity that offers the hope that all of us can grow in our creativity. Other chapters argue that all the rules of good writing are made to be broken--especially when breaking them results in clearer and more gripping writing, that tone, the key to powerful prose, is the writer's attitude toward what they are writing--what the writer thinks and feels, and that we are wired for metaphor. Most of all, he contends that less is more. This last offers the 700 words of Lincoln's second inaugural address, perhaps among the greatest, as an example of this principle. The final part of the book treats something you might not expect in a book on writing well. LePeau talks about the spirituality of writing, beginning with one's sense of calling. He recounts his answer to his daughter's question, "Dad, what's your calling?" He responded, "I think it is to glorify God with words, whether written or spoken." He offers five rubrics for discerning calling, illustrating from his own life how these worked out. The quest for "voice" is de-mystified. All writing is biography in the sense that it expresses what we've learned, and experienced and we do well to be self-aware, if not self-conscious about that. He writes about our struggle to let our work go into the world, and how we deal with the responses of others to that work. The book concludes with practical appendices on platforms, editors and agents, co-authoring, self-publishing, and copyright, including how ownership and proceeds of our work is to be handled should we die (it might be time to get that will revised!).  I mentioned that the book is humbling. I found myself holding my own writing up to LePeau's descriptions and realized how much work I have to do to "write better." That didn't discourage me. He offers alternatives and options I (and probably many other writers) haven't thought of. He showed me how much better rewriting can be and the benefits of editors, agents, and external readers who help us see the flaws we are blind to in our own writing. He suggests both that it is not crazy to sense one is called to write, and yet not to take oneself too seriously. He gives this down to earth advice: "Second, some people ask themselves, 'Am I a writer?' I don't think this is a very helpful question because it implies we must have some degree of innate talent to earn the title--and if we don't have that inborn ability, we should just do something else. My feeling is that if you write, you're a writer. If you work hard to improve your craft and to communicate clearly to others, you're a writer. And if others read what you write, let them decide what they think about it and you" (pp. 177-178). Writing for others not only is hard but uncovers all the insecurities within us. LePeau's advice here, and throughout the book, is characterized by the unpretentious common sense that calms fears, and offers the coaching that helps the writer lean into the hard work that turns ideas into books. Now, to get back to that book project.... ________________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: Thanks, InterVarsity Press, for the chance to read a galley copy of this forthcoming book. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Strohschein

    When I get a new gadget, I tend to set aside the user manual. I want to learn about the gadget by using it, not by reading a how-to guide. Writing can be similar - I just want to write, not spend time reading books on how to write. We might feel all our learning about the writing process can come through osmosis, by reading other books. Yet when I don't read my gadget's manual I can get stuck, I might not know how to use my new device as effectively as I could if I read all the details about the When I get a new gadget, I tend to set aside the user manual. I want to learn about the gadget by using it, not by reading a how-to guide. Writing can be similar - I just want to write, not spend time reading books on how to write. We might feel all our learning about the writing process can come through osmosis, by reading other books. Yet when I don't read my gadget's manual I can get stuck, I might not know how to use my new device as effectively as I could if I read all the details about the ins-and-outs of the gadget. The same can be said for guides to writing. Books on writing teach writers how to cultivate their craft so that they can improve their skills. "Write Better: A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality" is the second book on writing I've read this year after William Zinsser's classic "On Writing Well." Andrew Le Peau, one of the longtime editors for InterVarsity Press, divides his book into three sections. The first section, "The Craft of Writing," deals with some of the basics of the writing process such as narrowing the scope of a work to the right audience, how to persuade readers, and how to overcome writer's block. I have been facilitating workshops this past fall on finding and evaluating sources and going forward, I am going to incorporate Le Peau's suggestions for how to locate credible sources. He recommends that non-fiction writers realize the persuasive appeal and power of employing narrative writing because stories can stick with us in ways mere information cannot. The second section is "The Art of Writing" which continues to offer guidance for improving the quality of one's writing, such as coming up with fresh metaphors and admonishing writers to "show, not tell" (especially in evangelical media, there is a desire to ensure audiences understand the message being communicated but in doing so the message is overstated and it ultimately indicates that the writer/artist, etc...distrusts the audience to be able to grasp the message if it was conveyed in subtler ways). The final section is "The Spirituality of Writing" and, while perhaps not as practical as the previous sections in terms of the nuts and bolts of writing, it is this section that makes "Write Better" stand out, especially for Christians who hope their writing can be offered up to God. Le Peau addresses how writers can feel confident in writing about themselves and their relationship with God while not becoming narcissistic. I most appreciated Le Peau's chapter on "Spiritual Authority and Writing." I tend to trust articles that appear in "Christianity Today" or "Comment" because the writers of these articles have had their work looked over by editors whereas most bloggers simply publish their posts without any kind of accountability. Le Peau offers good insights into how we can strive to ensure we have good measures in place to keep our writing accountable. "Write Better" is peppered with all sorts of tips and insights into how to become more proficient at writing. It is easy to understand, practical, and I enjoyed how throughout the book, Le Peau would playfully reinforce his points. For instance, he writes "At other times, the conventions get in the way. And when they do, we shouldn't hesitate to throw them out. Ever" (p. 129). He then proceeds to demonstrate how using "Ever" as its own one-word sentence "communicates much more effectively than it would as part of a complete sentence" (p. 129). Le Peau includes several appendices in the back which provide further information on aspects of writing and publishing such as self-publishing, how to approach agents and editors, and the necessity of navigating the byzantine nature of copyright. I would recommend this book for fiction and non-fiction writers alike - it will prove to be an invaluable guide.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jared Wilson

    Excellent. I've been waiting for someone to write something like this for a while. This will become required reading in my writing courses at Spurgeon College and MBTS. Excellent. I've been waiting for someone to write something like this for a while. This will become required reading in my writing courses at Spurgeon College and MBTS.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lana

    I get nervous writing reviews for books about writing. This one is no exception. Le Peau has followed his calling of giving glory to God through words. This could be considered his answer to God’s gift. God’s gift to him has resulted in his gift to us. He teaches us so much through this one book that one could say it’s his body of work in one succinct set of pages. This deserves a spot on every Christian writer’s bookshelf.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marty

    I work for Andy's publisher but never got to interact with him before he retired. Nevertheless, I'm so happy I had the chance to read his new book early. I'm happier I get to give it its first of what I'm sure will be many positive Goodreads reviews. I'm a writer. At heart and in practice. I've been calling myself a writer and writing for as long as I can remember. And over the years I've developed a little collection of how-to-write books. This is one of the best. Andy's teaching is concise, sma I work for Andy's publisher but never got to interact with him before he retired. Nevertheless, I'm so happy I had the chance to read his new book early. I'm happier I get to give it its first of what I'm sure will be many positive Goodreads reviews. I'm a writer. At heart and in practice. I've been calling myself a writer and writing for as long as I can remember. And over the years I've developed a little collection of how-to-write books. This is one of the best. Andy's teaching is concise, smart, and approachable. But most of all he keeps you engaged with a mix of humor and sensitivity. The book is filled with not only practical tips that make you feel like you really can do it, but it has a teacher's (editor's) spirit to every page. The book is inspiring. It's broken into three sections: craft, art & spirituality of writing. There is a little overlap of each, but there's honestly so much gold in here that you'd have to read it a few times to catch it all. Highly highly recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Prata

    This past June, Blogger/Reviewer Tim Challies reviewed Andrew T. Le Peau’s new book “Write Better.” I’m a writer always looking for ways to hone my craft, and since Challies’ review was glowing, I bought the book. Here is my review. Author Le Peau has buckets of experience over many decades as an associate publisher for editorial at InterVarsity Press. I could learn from him, I thought. And I did. The first part of the book was nothing I hadn’t heard already in my years of writing and learning ab This past June, Blogger/Reviewer Tim Challies reviewed Andrew T. Le Peau’s new book “Write Better.” I’m a writer always looking for ways to hone my craft, and since Challies’ review was glowing, I bought the book. Here is my review. Author Le Peau has buckets of experience over many decades as an associate publisher for editorial at InterVarsity Press. I could learn from him, I thought. And I did. The first part of the book was nothing I hadn’t heard already in my years of writing and learning about writing, but the author said it well, so it was a great reminder for me. Chapters such as “Knowing Your Audience”, “Good Rewriting”, and “Cracking Writer’s Block” are all must-have chapters in a book about writing better. Le Peau is a good at his craft so even though the territory was familiar, I still learned from his insights. The part I enjoyed learning additional insights from was the section on The Art of Writing. This part had good lessons on Tone, Metaphor, Less is More (I need this lesson!), and Creativity were well worth the price of the book. Another section I enjoyed was the specific emphasis on The Spirituality of Writing. As Christians we should take special care in order to shepherd our talents for the glory of God. I enjoyed these chapters of the book. Stewards with a Message and Spiritual Authority and Writing were helpful chapters, among the others in this third section of the book. Challies said “there is little to critique” in Le Peau’s book, but I did find three small things I’d like to warn the ladies about. By small I don’t mean that the concepts themselves are small, but his mentions of them were brief or passing. 1. In the chapter about The Spirituality of Writing About Yourself, the author mentions self-examination, which is all well and good. But he mentions examen or examination of conscience in the Catholic Ignatius tradition. According to the website Ignatian Spirituality, the examen is part of Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises, and is defined thus, “The Daily Examen is a technique of prayerful reflection on the events of the day in order to detect God’s presence and discern his direction for us. The Examen is an ancient practice in the Church that can help us see God’s hand at work in our whole experience.” While the five steps of the examen are OK in and of themselves, there is no reason to include a Catholic mystical practice in a book aimed at evangelicals. Examining one’s conscience can be described without the baggage of using a method in a false religion and minus any potential harm to a naive sister who might go off and pursue these practices, seemingly legitimized in a glowingly reviewed book. 2. Le Peau mentions that in some organizations leadership has been restricted against people of color and for women. He offers no facts of basis for his assertion that people of color in some organizations or Christian community are denied opportunity to lead. As for women, he writes, “Many institutions, including some in conservative Christian traditions, are largely led by while males. As a result, the ability of marginal people to lead and be heard has been limited.” (p. 205). He wrongly conflates ‘lead’ with ‘be heard’. People who aren’t leading can and are heard every day. Ability of women to lead is restricted to certain spheres via God’s command. There’s nothing we can do about that except accept it or rebel against it. I wish he had not bent to this cultural moment and stayed within the confines of writing about writing better. He applauds that the digital revolution has given many people a voice for their writing, but then complains that “putting ourselves under authority potentially means returning to obscurity.” Yes, and that’s fine, because submitting to authority is what we are biblically called to do, and if it means some of the redeemed ‘labor in obscurity’, then so be it. Which is more important, following God’s commands, or getting famous? 3. He advises that dreams and visions are legitimate ways that God affirms our calling to write and how He guides us at times. He normalizes the dream reception method by mentioning the “key people” who are called to certain tasks in the Bible, such as Abraham, Joseph, Jacob, Pharaoh, Gideon, Pilate’s wife, etc. and that these “key figures” received guidance from dreams. (p. 175). He then goes on to relate a dream he had to write a song. He reminds us that dreams can come from an evil source, so be wary and “don’t rely on dreams apart from other forms of guidance, such as Scripture…” (p. 175). I dislike when people advise us to go outside of scripture for guidance and then try to cement that method as legitimate by relating their own experience. Scripture alone is enough. As John Owen is said to have said, “If private revelations agree with Scripture, they are unnecessary, and if they disagree, they are false.” Le Peau’s mention of the examen was just that, a mere passing mention, as was the mention of leadership being restricted to white men. The dreams issue was half a page. Three small portions of a long book full of good ideas. I would feel bad if I failed to mention them and then some sister goes forward seeking dreams for her writing or pursues Catholic mysticism as a legitimate way of confronting one’s conscience. As long as I was on the writing/reading improvement zone, I also bought Words for Readers and Writers: Spirit-Pooled Dialogues by Larry Woiwode, and Writers to Read: Nine Names That Belong on Your Bookshelf by Douglas Wilson. I’ll let you know how those were after I finish them! Thanks for reading. I hope I ‘wrote better.’

  9. 5 out of 5

    J.

    Reviewing a book entitled Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality admittedly feels like a strangely overwhelming and incongruent task. If a young and unpublished writer has any business dealing with a lifelong editor’s wisdom it should be in having their book review my writing rather than letting my writing review their book! And yet I write anyway — and in this seeming paradox lies the heart of Andrew T. Le Peau’s work: for all its hard, slow, long work, writing is worth it, so Reviewing a book entitled Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality admittedly feels like a strangely overwhelming and incongruent task. If a young and unpublished writer has any business dealing with a lifelong editor’s wisdom it should be in having their book review my writing rather than letting my writing review their book! And yet I write anyway — and in this seeming paradox lies the heart of Andrew T. Le Peau’s work: for all its hard, slow, long work, writing is worth it, so here’s how to do it better. As a writer, teacher, speaker, theologian, and editor with over three decades of experience Le Peau brings a rich and nuanced collection of tools to the table. This slather of experience works itself into the books three sections: (1) the craft of writing, (2) the art of writing, and (3) the spirituality of writing. The first focuses primarily on the nuts and bolts of getting words on paper: fitting structure, persuasion, drama, and creative and concrete practices for breaking the bonds of writer’s block. All this and rewriting… and rewriting, and oh, some more rewriting. The second delves into the slightly more messy art of writing, covering rules to know and (at times) to break, guidelines for metaphor and when less is more. This section moves the reader towards a sense that writing is more than imbibing rules. It needs a person behind it, a person grounded in Christ. And thus we arrive at the last section, where writing is set forth as both spiritual gift and spiritual discipline. Here the various threads that have permeated Le Peau’s work pull together. All throughout the reader senses that writing is not a mere neutral task; it necessarily involves spiritual and moral realities. Whether it’s the ethics of plagiarism, of representing your material with truthfulness and integrity, or the reality of being an authority and being under an authority in writing, writing is a moral and a spiritual practice. And thus, it is not one to be taken lightly. And yet, for all Le Peau’s sobriety one comes away from Write Better longing to do just that, to write better. The book’s tone remains consistent: for all the possible pitfalls, writing is worthwhile and necessary. It is good. The appendixes on creating a platform, working with editors and publishers, self- publishing, and copyright are worth the whole book for their insight into what, at least for an outsider, is a terrifying and mysterious world. And yet the choice to place them as appendixes is particularly helpful, for it appears to say, “You can’t worry about these things, till you get the most important parts right.” As such this book is a supremely useful addition to the bookshelf of anyone desiring to get those ‘most important parts’ right: the craft, art, and spirituality of writing. I thank InterVarsity Press for providing me with an advance copy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    If you read any non-fiction from Christian publishers, you are most likely familiar with InterVarsity Press (IVP). If that is the case, you have also unknowingly benefited from Andrew Le Peau's talents. Andrew Le Peau has distilled his years of working with and advising writers at IVP into his newest book Write Better: A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality. As the sub-title suggests, Le Peau divides his book into three parts. In Part 1: The Craft of Writing, Le Peau tackles 10 topics If you read any non-fiction from Christian publishers, you are most likely familiar with InterVarsity Press (IVP). If that is the case, you have also unknowingly benefited from Andrew Le Peau's talents. Andrew Le Peau has distilled his years of working with and advising writers at IVP into his newest book Write Better: A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality. As the sub-title suggests, Le Peau divides his book into three parts. In Part 1: The Craft of Writing, Le Peau tackles 10 topics which even the most experienced writers struggle with such as opening sentences, writer's block, and re-writing. I found Le Peau's chapters on "The Character of Persuasion" and "The Craft of Persuasion" particularly useful. In these chapters, he addresses topics related to research, finding reliable sources, and bias in sources as well as how to write persuasively. As I teach how to research, I found this section quite useful and will be referencing it frequently. Moving to Part 2: The Art of Writing, Le Peau emphasizes that all writing needs to be creative writing in order to present content in a new way that will connect with your audience. He then proceeds to discuss tone, metaphor, and other topics. I quite enjoyed his admonition that it's OK to break the "rules" particularly when it serves your purpose. Part 3: The Spirituality of Writing sets Writing Better apart from all of the other books about writing. Le Peau emphasizes that writing is a spiritual act and can be a ministry. He particularly cautions that those who write and publish in any format are looked up to by others and given authority. This authority must be handled carefully--especially so when dealing with spiritual matters. Le Peau also skillfully addresses the important questions of promoting your work as a writer. Le Peau concludes this marvelous book with numerous appendices. These 5 appendices include words of wisdom from his years of editing experience regarding topics such as coauthors, copyright, and self-publishing. I will admit that given Le Peau's long history in publishing his comments about self-publishing were a bit surprising but made sense. Le Peau has also posted additional resources online that can be downloaded as well. Anyone who writes in any capacity or who desires to write should add Write Better to their bookshelf. While focusing on non-fiction writing, many of Le Peau's suggestions apply to fiction as well. While reading the book straight through is wonderful, Write Better will be most useful as a frequently referenced text to work on specific aspects of writing. Writing groups may find it useful to work through each chapter in a workshop setting. Writing teachers will find Le Peau's work a useful resource as a textbook or minimally as a resource in preparing lessons on these topics. His downloadable instructor resource Questions and Exercises for Students and Others is most useful. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received Write Better via NetGalley from InterVarsity Press. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Lee

    I never set out to be a writer. But as I started reading more, I wanted to write more. And as I find myself enjoying the act of writing reviews of books, I know that there is much room to improve. At the start of the new year, I have a goal to write better. Author, editor, and writer Andrew T. Le Peau admits that writing is not easy, but it can get better. He was the longtime associate publisher for editorial at InterVarsity Press, where he worked for over forty years. This book is his way to hel I never set out to be a writer. But as I started reading more, I wanted to write more. And as I find myself enjoying the act of writing reviews of books, I know that there is much room to improve. At the start of the new year, I have a goal to write better. Author, editor, and writer Andrew T. Le Peau admits that writing is not easy, but it can get better. He was the longtime associate publisher for editorial at InterVarsity Press, where he worked for over forty years. This book is his way to help nonfiction writers master their skills while offering insights learned along the way. The Craft of Writing The book is divided into three sections: The Craft of Writing, The Art of Writing, and The Spirituality of Writing. For my needs, I found the first section to be the most helpful. Le Peau shares about giving structure, creating dramatic nonfiction, and cracking our writer’s block. He gives concrete advice with anecdotes from his own life. The Art of Writing The second section, The Art of Writing, talks about creativity, tone, metaphors, and more. It is a section that I will need to spend more time with as I sharpen my skills. While The Art of Writing is somewhat of an intangible subject, Le Peau seems comfortable sharing his advice and expertise. The Spirituality of Writing The Spirituality of Writing revealed a paradigm shift for me. I am starting to see more clearly my specific calling to write, the need to understand the spiritual authority that might combine with my writing, and the courage it will take to steward the message well. These chapters serve as a small theology on writing, and I recommend it to all who are serious about their craft. Writing Better The book includes several appendixes regarding writing platforms, editors and agents, coauthors, self-publishing, and copyright. Le Peau mentions his online resources as well as recommended reading. Notes and an index are included, making this an excellent reference work. After reading this book, I am eager to get started writing better this new year. I hope to be more polished, more creative, and own my voice. And after writing this review, I believe I am well on my way. I was provided a free copy of Write Better but was not required to write a positive review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality by Andrew T.Le Peau is a book born for and with a necessity: divulging the lessons learned by mr. Le Peau during these past 40 years of writing, teaching to other Christian writers: the best modality for a good approach in Christian non-fiction and the best way of writing it. Le Peau confesses that when he was little he didn't love to read at all, but he must thanks his two siblings and teachers if he became an avid reader as well. The Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality by Andrew T.Le Peau is a book born for and with a necessity: divulging the lessons learned by mr. Le Peau during these past 40 years of writing, teaching to other Christian writers: the best modality for a good approach in Christian non-fiction and the best way of writing it. Le Peau confesses that when he was little he didn't love to read at all, but he must thanks his two siblings and teachers if he became an avid reader as well. The book is divided in Three Parts: the first one, the art of crafting will immerse the potential christian writer of non-fiction in the art of creation of a book. The second part involves The Art of Writing while the Third One The Spirituality of Writing. It's a quick reading, but plenty of suggestions, tips, quotes about writers of fiction for let you give you an idea of what, other famous writers of the past or present thinks about writing. I loved the test for thinking divergently but also all that advice in grade to create a new shape of creativity in the daily stressing life of a writer. I found reassuring the chapter about grammar and how to use it, like also how to use a good metaphor to give a more powerful structure at the lines. Most important adds Andrew is to find "your own distinct way of writing." Why this? Because sometimes searching to imitate a famous writer doesn't pay and it's better to search for your own writing-style. Let's remember that the way of writing represents also a sparkle of our personality and character. Why hiding it putting a mask? A chapter I guess you'll find intriguing as I did, is the one of autobiography. "We write. People choose to listen to us, follow us, maybe even pay money to support us, to hear us speak, or to buy our books. They give us the gift of the measure of authority in their lives. That is a trust we need to handle with care" adds the author. Written with simplicity and with the idea of being helpful to everyone, I suggest this book to everyone and in particular of course to all that potential writers still confused about what to write, how to write, where publishing etc. I thank NetGalley for this ebook.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Le Peau offers writers a distillation of wisdom gleaned from decades of editorial experience. After reading his book, I felt as though I'd attended a writer's conference--all within the comfort of my home, at a pace I controlled. The breadth of topics and the infusion of examples offers something for every writing level. It is definitely a book that one must read slowly--and repeatedly--to reap the full benefit. As the subtitle hints at, the book is divided into three main parts. The Craft of Wri Le Peau offers writers a distillation of wisdom gleaned from decades of editorial experience. After reading his book, I felt as though I'd attended a writer's conference--all within the comfort of my home, at a pace I controlled. The breadth of topics and the infusion of examples offers something for every writing level. It is definitely a book that one must read slowly--and repeatedly--to reap the full benefit. As the subtitle hints at, the book is divided into three main parts. The Craft of Writing will guide writers through the topics of opening, audience, structure, writer's block, rewriting, and creating titles. The Art of Writing explores creativity, rule-breaking, and metaphors. Finally, the Spirituality of Writing discusses the call to write, finding one's voice and some principles to guide Chrisian authors. But that's not all, Le Peau also offers appendices that cover: ~Platform ~Editors & Agents ~Self-Publishing ~Legal Considerations (copyright, wills) Readers will come away with tips for what to write, how to write, who to write for and what to do if your writing fails (or if it succeeds!). Write Better offers a comprehensive look at writing from creation to publication and puts a wealth of wisdom at the fingertips of writers of any skill level. Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of Write Better from NetGalley for the purpose of review. No other compensation was received.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Holmes

    This book really deserves more than 5 stars. This is my second read, and I was more compelled, encouraged, and inspired by this book the second time around. This is a must read for anyone who writes, whether author, pastor, blogger, social media influencer, or if you aspire to those things. This book will practically make you better at a writer, make you love reading more, and help you see the work of Jesus in your writing or in your thoughts about writing. This book could serve as a textbook, w This book really deserves more than 5 stars. This is my second read, and I was more compelled, encouraged, and inspired by this book the second time around. This is a must read for anyone who writes, whether author, pastor, blogger, social media influencer, or if you aspire to those things. This book will practically make you better at a writer, make you love reading more, and help you see the work of Jesus in your writing or in your thoughts about writing. This book could serve as a textbook, workshop, reference, and mentor. Brilliantly written.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin A Epps

    As a fiction writer, and part time blogger. I enjoyed the tips and anecdotes in this book. I've already applied some of the suggestions to my blog. I have found I am getting more hits on those blogs since applying these tips. I love the slightly humorous tone Andrew uses to explain each section (rule seems too harsh). Thank you NetGalley for the review copy. I definitely need a physical copy of this one asap. As a fiction writer, and part time blogger. I enjoyed the tips and anecdotes in this book. I've already applied some of the suggestions to my blog. I have found I am getting more hits on those blogs since applying these tips. I love the slightly humorous tone Andrew uses to explain each section (rule seems too harsh). Thank you NetGalley for the review copy. I definitely need a physical copy of this one asap.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Write Better is one of the best books about writing that I've read. It's full of humor, wisdom, and great examples, and it's also completely sane. It includes more than just the nuts and bolts of grammar and style, discussing important topics like ethical persuasion, creativity, and how to handle both fame and critiques. It extends beyond the craft of writing to the character of the writer--a timely and necessary subject. A great book for both novice and experienced writers. Write Better is one of the best books about writing that I've read. It's full of humor, wisdom, and great examples, and it's also completely sane. It includes more than just the nuts and bolts of grammar and style, discussing important topics like ethical persuasion, creativity, and how to handle both fame and critiques. It extends beyond the craft of writing to the character of the writer--a timely and necessary subject. A great book for both novice and experienced writers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Imes

    Such a helpful book! Le Peau talks about the craft of writing, including how to overcome common roadblocks. In these sections his book reminded me of Zinsser's 'On Writing Well' -- practical, with good examples. But Le Peau goes on to talk about the spirituality of writing -- how to think Christianly about discerning a call to write, building a platform, marketing, and navigating fame (when it comes and when it doesn't). He offers great advice about how to cultivate humility and stay grounded. T Such a helpful book! Le Peau talks about the craft of writing, including how to overcome common roadblocks. In these sections his book reminded me of Zinsser's 'On Writing Well' -- practical, with good examples. But Le Peau goes on to talk about the spirituality of writing -- how to think Christianly about discerning a call to write, building a platform, marketing, and navigating fame (when it comes and when it doesn't). He offers great advice about how to cultivate humility and stay grounded. This was exactly the book I needed this month, and I'm so grateful for his wisdom gained through years of experience as an editor and writer. I expect to turn to Le Peau's book again and again in years to come!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Nickerson

    Writing is hard. Andrew T. Le Peau says that straight out. Then he goes on to show us how writing can also be deeply fulfilling and missional. This book felt like a feast, which I devoured in bite-sized pieces. It is one I will certainly read again.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Landon Coleman

    I can't imagine a more difficult genre of book to write than a book on writing. Le Peau's book is easy to read and immediately helpful for anyone who writes sermons, blogs, novels, articles, or essays. I can't imagine a more difficult genre of book to write than a book on writing. Le Peau's book is easy to read and immediately helpful for anyone who writes sermons, blogs, novels, articles, or essays.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christina Gilliland

    Practical. Filled with numerous writing prompts and tactics. If you are interested in writing, this will become a primer for you in your writing craft. Highly recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Castaneda

    Write Better by Andrew T LePeau is so much more than just a craft book. Oh, it’s definitely a craft book. Unlike other books about writing, reading just a few sentences of this book quickly taught me what my own novel is missing. This book has a wealth of information for new and experienced writers. But it goes far beyond the mechanics of writing to the substance below, to the purpose behind it all. I highly recommend this book. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher with no o Write Better by Andrew T LePeau is so much more than just a craft book. Oh, it’s definitely a craft book. Unlike other books about writing, reading just a few sentences of this book quickly taught me what my own novel is missing. This book has a wealth of information for new and experienced writers. But it goes far beyond the mechanics of writing to the substance below, to the purpose behind it all. I highly recommend this book. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher with no obligations. These opinions are entirely my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This book makes writing sound so simple. It really breaks down how to write a piece from start to finish. When you look at writing this way, writing doesn't seem so overwhelming! This book makes writing sound so simple. It really breaks down how to write a piece from start to finish. When you look at writing this way, writing doesn't seem so overwhelming!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Levi

    Very helpful! Le Peau’s perspective as an editor adds tremendous value to his advice. Whereas most books on writing focus on details in the craft, he focuses on the final product.

  24. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

    3.5 stars. Longish for what I was looking for. Helpful, but not as helpful as a few others. Still gained some good insight, especially on calling as a writer. That chapter is worth the price of the book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathanael Camp

    Meh. Not bad. It had some good advice, but it felt pretty dull at parts and I found myself wanting to rather read the bibliography than the actual content the author wrote.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashish Mathew

    Just an excellent book. Concise and helpful about the art, craft, spirituality and process of writing and publishing. The author can just as authoritatively write about preaching as he does writing. No hesitation — 5 stars!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kidwell

    Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality by Andrew T. Le Peau InterVarsity Press IVP Books Christian , Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 08 Oct 2019 I am reviewing a copy of Write Better through InterVarsity Press and Netgalley: Writing is not easy, but we can improve upon it with this primer on non-fiction writing. The author, publisher author and editor and editor for over forty years, who cheered on many writers. Andrew T. Le Peau offers insights from his perspective. The skills L Write Better A Lifelong Editor on Craft, Art, and Spirituality by Andrew T. Le Peau InterVarsity Press IVP Books Christian , Religion & Spirituality Pub Date 08 Oct 2019 I am reviewing a copy of Write Better through InterVarsity Press and Netgalley: Writing is not easy, but we can improve upon it with this primer on non-fiction writing. The author, publisher author and editor and editor for over forty years, who cheered on many writers. Andrew T. Le Peau offers insights from his perspective. The skills Le Peau shows us that can be mastered are finding strong openings and closings, to focusing on an audience as well as creating clear structure, and to crafting a persuasive. This book includes wide ranging examples in both fiction and non-fiction. He also goes on to demystify aspects of art in writing such as creativity, tone, and metaphor. He considers strategies that can move writers toward fresher, more vital, and perhaps more beautiful expressions of the human condition. Write Better shows us how the act of writing can affect our life in God. This book would be beneficial to writers whether Veteran or aspiring. I give Write Better five out of five stars! Happy Reading!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    Write Better, published by InterVarsity Press in 2019, is one expression of LePeau’s vocation to “glorify God with words, whether written or spoken,” along with his personal invitation to examine the writing life as a craft, as an art, and as a spiritual practice. With a balance of humor and sagacity, he takes on topics from the importance of thorough and careful attribution to writer’s block and the role of the outline outside Miss Whitebread’s fifth grade classroom. However, for my money, his Write Better, published by InterVarsity Press in 2019, is one expression of LePeau’s vocation to “glorify God with words, whether written or spoken,” along with his personal invitation to examine the writing life as a craft, as an art, and as a spiritual practice. With a balance of humor and sagacity, he takes on topics from the importance of thorough and careful attribution to writer’s block and the role of the outline outside Miss Whitebread’s fifth grade classroom. However, for my money, his greatest gift to readers and writers is his examination of what he has called “the spirituality of writing.” (169) THAT MIGHT BE A CALL It was a great relief to me to be reminded that there is no secret sauce to finding out if writing is my calling. If you wonder, says LePeau, then “Write. Then write some more. Then write a lot more. Try fiction. Try nonfiction. Experiment with different styles. Get suggestions for improvement from qualified people. Revise. See how you like it. See how others like it. And if those things check out, keep going. That might be a call. And if not, no problem. Just keep listening, and maybe keep writing anyway.” (178) Since we’re all in agreement that burning bushes and talking equines are in rare supply, it was a great gift to discover the five rubrics that have guided Andrew LePeau’s sense of God’s leading and direction: Keep your eyes open to what God is already doing. (172) The guiding question is, “What themes, people, events, ideas keep coming up in your life?” (173) If God is going to use your writing gift, it is likely to be within the context of an existing passion. Pay attention to what gives you joy and energy. (173) LePeau was hand-stitching book bindings in elementary school and self-published a joke book in high school, so his career in publishing certainly makes sense. He poses the question to his readers: What gives you a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment? When you have answered this question, you may be well on your way to identifying your calling. Listen to others. (174) If knowledgeable friends affirm you in a particular area, if they encourage you to continue, this is a sign that God may be at work, leading you to invest your life here. Don’t ignore dreams. (175) This piece of advice comes as a surprise, and yet without assigning to them the weight of revelation, LePeau urges believers to be open to the creative input that comes to us as we are asleep . Follow Jesus. (176) If we are not faithfully fulfilling what we already know of God’s revealed will from His Word, it is unlikely that we will recognize his voice when it does come to us. Whether or not you are called to be a writer, if you are a follower of Christ, you are called to pay attention. Be alert to all that God is doing around you, and write what you see. Then, if God entrusts to you a message and a following, you will be ready to step into the calling God has envisioned for you. “Writing is hard work,” LePeau cautions. “Writing well is even harder.” If, however, you find that you cannot not write, if you find satisfaction in the process of prying up commas and nailing them down in other places, and if you are willing to refine your craft and to steward the message God has given you with humility, grace, and gratitude (whether anyone else ever reads it or not), you just might be called to be a writer.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I’ve found this book to be a perfect writing companion. Le Peau was at InterVarsity Press for over 40 years. The book covers the 3 major areas nonfiction Christian writers must hone: craft (structure, rewriting, writer’s block), art (creativity, tone), and spirituality (calling, courage, etc.) Really appreciated the appendices on platform development, hiring an agent, self-publishing, and more. The book is not only educational; it is thoroughly inspirational. A favorite quote: “𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑔𝑜𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑠 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑡 I’ve found this book to be a perfect writing companion. Le Peau was at InterVarsity Press for over 40 years. The book covers the 3 major areas nonfiction Christian writers must hone: craft (structure, rewriting, writer’s block), art (creativity, tone), and spirituality (calling, courage, etc.) Really appreciated the appendices on platform development, hiring an agent, self-publishing, and more. The book is not only educational; it is thoroughly inspirational. A favorite quote: “𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑔𝑜𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑠 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑓𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑙𝑦 𝑤𝑟𝑖𝑡𝑒 𝑎 𝑏𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑟, 𝑚𝑎𝑘𝑒 𝑏𝑢𝑐𝑘𝑒𝑡𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑦, 𝑏𝑒𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑜𝑢𝑠, 𝑔𝑒𝑡 𝑟𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑟𝑒𝑣𝑖𝑒𝑤𝑠, 𝑜𝑟 𝑤𝑖𝑛 𝑎 𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑔𝑖𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑤𝑎𝑟𝑑. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑔𝑜𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘 𝑎𝑡 𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑦 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑗𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑎𝑠 𝑎𝑛 𝑜𝑝𝑝𝑜𝑟𝑡𝑢𝑛𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑔𝑟𝑜𝑤 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑛. 𝑊𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑎𝑙𝑤𝑎𝑦𝑠 𝑠𝑢𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑒𝑑 𝑎𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡.” 💚

  30. 5 out of 5

    Iola

    Write Better had some ideas I disliked or disagreed with. Le Peau even appeared to contradict himself on a couple of points. But it’s definitely a book worth reading, because the good far outweighs the less good. I found three main faults with the book. First, Le Peau points out the importance of a great introduction as a way of engaging the reader, but I found his introduction somewhat boring. Second, he discloses that parts of this book have been taken from his blog, then goes on to caution the Write Better had some ideas I disliked or disagreed with. Le Peau even appeared to contradict himself on a couple of points. But it’s definitely a book worth reading, because the good far outweighs the less good. I found three main faults with the book. First, Le Peau points out the importance of a great introduction as a way of engaging the reader, but I found his introduction somewhat boring. Second, he discloses that parts of this book have been taken from his blog, then goes on to caution the reader against sharing too much of their book online. Hmm. Finally, I think the structure of the book doesn’t entirely work—he talks about the craft of writing, the art of writing, the spirituality of writing, then has five not-quite-related appendicies. Parts of the book read more like a collection of related blog posts rather than a planned book. The content is great. It’s just that it doesn’t always hang together as an overall whole. But don’t let that analysis leave you thinking this book is an automatic pass. There is a lot of good information in Write Better, and it certainly got me thinking. And that’s the point. We need to think, and being faced with ideas we disagree with forces us to think in a way reading the agreeable books doesn’t. Let’s consider my least favourite thought-provoking idea: If we want to keep our thinking sharp, we need to exercise. Yes, I know. Exercise is anathema to many writers. But Karen Posta, president of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology says vigorous physical exercise is the only activity known to trigger the birth of new neurons. To be in top shape mentally, we have to be in shape physically. Yes, it makes sense. It doesn’t mean I have to like it. Le Peau covers how to make our message memorable using techniques like alliteration, analogy, metaphor, and even cliche. He reminds us to use subtle repetition to make our point stick (a technique often used to encourage us to believe lies), and to use stories. Yes, those points all came from the writing section, which I found the strongest. But Le Peau also makes some pertinent observations about author platform: We don’t seek to build a platform for ourselves but for our message—so it can be heard. On that basis, if we’re sharing the message God has given us, then building a platform is God-serving, not self-serving. Le Peau believes it best if authors have spent two to five years building a platform before sending in their first proposal. Sure, he’s talking as a career employee in a traditional Christian publishing house, but the same guidance surely holds true for self-published authors. There is a lot more good in Write Better than bad. As such, it’s an excellent book for Christian nonfiction writers … which is most of us, as even fiction writers write nonfiction blog posts. Thanks to IVP Press and NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

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