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Rumpelstiltskin: The Graphic Novel (Graphic Spin)

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To repay her father's debts, Mirabelle promises the King that she'll spin his straw into gold. An evil troll agrees to help her for a price. Now, Mirabelle must repay an even greater debt, unless she can guess the terrible creature's name. To repay her father's debts, Mirabelle promises the King that she'll spin his straw into gold. An evil troll agrees to help her for a price. Now, Mirabelle must repay an even greater debt, unless she can guess the terrible creature's name.


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To repay her father's debts, Mirabelle promises the King that she'll spin his straw into gold. An evil troll agrees to help her for a price. Now, Mirabelle must repay an even greater debt, unless she can guess the terrible creature's name. To repay her father's debts, Mirabelle promises the King that she'll spin his straw into gold. An evil troll agrees to help her for a price. Now, Mirabelle must repay an even greater debt, unless she can guess the terrible creature's name.

30 review for Rumpelstiltskin: The Graphic Novel (Graphic Spin)

  1. 5 out of 5

    L12_markmesserly

    This review pertains to the 2009 hardcover binding. Lavishly illustrated by award winning artist Erik Valdez Y Alanis, Martin Powell retells this fairy tale with little variation from the basic form. Product details (Barnes and Noble) suggest an age range of 8-13, with a Lexile score of GN330L. A nice feature is a glossary at the end, including words such as hobgoblin and flamebird. There is also a brief history of the story, including reference to Rumpelstiltskin’s name variations in Irish (Trit This review pertains to the 2009 hardcover binding. Lavishly illustrated by award winning artist Erik Valdez Y Alanis, Martin Powell retells this fairy tale with little variation from the basic form. Product details (Barnes and Noble) suggest an age range of 8-13, with a Lexile score of GN330L. A nice feature is a glossary at the end, including words such as hobgoblin and flamebird. There is also a brief history of the story, including reference to Rumpelstiltskin’s name variations in Irish (Trit-a-Trot) and Scottish versions (Whuppity Stoorie). The author also references Grimm’s Fairy Tales. Discussion questions and writing prompts conclude the text. Paperback and electronic versions are available. This reviewer did not detect offensive or didactic content, except for idealized portrayal of Mirabelle and the king in terms of body type – the beautiful person syndrome. Content was culturally ambiguous, although inclusion of references to the Irish and Scottish versions of the tale were welcome. Children amused with this graphic novel might also enjoy Hansel and Gretel: The Graphic Novel by Donald Lemke, and illustrated by Sean Dietrich (ISBN: 9781434207678). This has a slightly lower Lexile score of GN300L. There are dozens of collections of Grimm’s tales, suited to all ages. The collection by publisher CreateSpace features 25 tales, and suggested for ages 8 and higher. An interesting classroom activity for this text involves an online story-mapping organizer, from ReadWriteThink.org: http://www.readwritethink.org/files/r...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rfrancik

    Stone Arch has just released a new series of fairly tales for 3rd-8th graders in graphic novel format and they are GOOD! I've loved the lush pictures of Paul Zelinsky's Rumpelstiltskin but was amazed at the power of the graphic format. The font is large, spare and accessible for reluctant readers while raising and dispatching some interesting questions such as, Why would you marry someone who threatened to kill you if you didn't spin straw into gold? The cover is dark and creepy, and the action b Stone Arch has just released a new series of fairly tales for 3rd-8th graders in graphic novel format and they are GOOD! I've loved the lush pictures of Paul Zelinsky's Rumpelstiltskin but was amazed at the power of the graphic format. The font is large, spare and accessible for reluctant readers while raising and dispatching some interesting questions such as, Why would you marry someone who threatened to kill you if you didn't spin straw into gold? The cover is dark and creepy, and the action begins immediately. Rumplestiltskin becomes larger and ever more stylized as the story progresses eventually covering half the page and resembling a dragon. This story should be part of any fairytale collection. It will appeal to boys, girls and the children who like scary stories. Reviews: Other books in this series have been reviewed but Rumplestiltskin is new and has not been. Booklist , November 2008 says about Jack in the Beanstalk, "elegantly simplifies and streamlines an already fast-paced tale, producing a very crisp version." The Goddess of YA Literature; http://professornana.livejournal.com/..., September 2008 in reviewing Cinderella says, "This GN variant is the closest to the Grimm that I have seen. ...Stone Arch is doing mighty interesting things with the GN format."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    The pictures were disturbing. The HUGE eyes and pointy ears were like a mix between anime and elves. The story was just bad. It ignored parts of the original instead of trying to explain them and then softened the "good" guys and hardened the "bad" guy. Poorly done with creepy pictures. The pictures were disturbing. The HUGE eyes and pointy ears were like a mix between anime and elves. The story was just bad. It ignored parts of the original instead of trying to explain them and then softened the "good" guys and hardened the "bad" guy. Poorly done with creepy pictures.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    In this Graphic Novel version of Rumpelstiltskin, Martin Powell and illustrator Erik Valdex Y Alanis offer readers an alternative look at this classic tale. Unlike the 1985 version by Paul Galdone or the 1986 version by Paul O Zelinsky, this version strays form the classic tale in several ways. The colorful cartoon like title page introduces the characters with their proper names. Daniel is the miller, Rumpelstiltskin is Rumpelstiltskin and Mirabelle is the miller's daughter. The layout of the p In this Graphic Novel version of Rumpelstiltskin, Martin Powell and illustrator Erik Valdex Y Alanis offer readers an alternative look at this classic tale. Unlike the 1985 version by Paul Galdone or the 1986 version by Paul O Zelinsky, this version strays form the classic tale in several ways. The colorful cartoon like title page introduces the characters with their proper names. Daniel is the miller, Rumpelstiltskin is Rumpelstiltskin and Mirabelle is the miller's daughter. The layout of the pictures clearly presents Mirabelle as the companion of King Konrad and offers the first clue that this version is not like others. In this version, Mirabelle is sent to spin gold from straw, not because of her father's boastfulness, but because she must repay his debts from stealing. To make matters worse, the father has offered to pay back ten times the amount of the debt. In this version, Powell and Alanis retain the basic story but play with the depiction of character intentions that goes too far for my tastes. This story in a graphic novel will not suit all reader tastes. As in all graphic novels, the illustrations tell the story and shape our images of the characters. I was turned off by the images of the miller's daughter as a too skinny girl with eyes that take up most of her face. She looked more like a creature from Star Wars to me. Rumpelstiltskin was portrayed as a green evil flying creator with razor sharp shark teeth and a nose like Pinocchio. I was not at all sympathetic to these characters. I felt that this version of Rumpelstiltskin went too far beyond the text. This text showed me that classic tales must mirror something in the real life of the reader to engage them. While we know that there will always be magical elements in these story that are beyond belief, the readers must find something that they can related to in the characters. This book was intended for older audiences. Classroom teachers could present this an exploration in how classic t In this Graphic Novel version of Rumpelstiltskin, Martin Powell and illustrator Erik Valdex Y Alanis offer readers a alternative look at this classic tale. Unlike the 1985 version by Paul Galdone or the 1986 version by Paul O Zelinsky, this version strays form the classic tale in several ways. The colorful cartoon like title page introduces the characters with their proper names. Daniel is the miller, Rumpelstiltskin is Rumpelstiltskin and Mirabelle is the miller's daughter. The layout of the pictures clearly presents Mirabelle as the companion of King Konrad and offers the first clue that this version is not like others. In this version, Mirabelle is sent to spin gold from straw, not because of her father's boastfulness, but because she must repay his debts from stealing. To make matters worse, the father has offered to pay back ten times the amount of the debt. In this version, Powell and Alanis retain the basic story but play with the depiction of character intentions that goes too far for my tastes. This story in a graphic novel will not suit all reader tastes. As in all graphic novels, the illustrations tell the story and shape our images of the characters. I was turned off by the images of the miller's daughter as a too skinny girl with eyes that take up most of her face. She looked more like a creature from Star Wars to me. Rumpelstiltskin was portrayed as a green evil flying creator with razor sharp shark teeth and a nose like Pinocchio. I was not at all sympathetic to these characters. I felt that this version of Rumpelstiltskin went too far beyond the text. This text showed me that classic tales must mirror something in the real life of the reader to engage them. While we know that there will always be magical elements in these story that are beyond belief, the readers must find something that they can related to in the characters. This book was intended for older audiences. Classroom teachers could present this an exploration in how classic tales can be translated into graphic novel form.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    In this version of Rumpelstiltskin, all of the male characters are just the worst, more so than usual. The Miller’s Daughter, here named Mirabelle, shines, but the rest of the cast brings down the book overall. We’ve got a king who’s acting like a total despot, threatening beheading for crimes like lies and debts. In most versions he’s just greedy and the threat of violence feels like a one off – here it’s clearly his typical Tuesday morning. We’ve got a miller who, in a moment of panic and fear, In this version of Rumpelstiltskin, all of the male characters are just the worst, more so than usual. The Miller’s Daughter, here named Mirabelle, shines, but the rest of the cast brings down the book overall. We’ve got a king who’s acting like a total despot, threatening beheading for crimes like lies and debts. In most versions he’s just greedy and the threat of violence feels like a one off – here it’s clearly his typical Tuesday morning. We’ve got a miller who, in a moment of panic and fear, totally throws his daughter to the wolves to try and save himself. It’s debatable if this is better or worse than the straw-into-gold as a ridiculous brag. And, of course, Rumpelstiltskin himself, rubs his claws together and licks his pointy teeth, without a single redeeming feature. He is just plain evil. And he is very good at what he does. I actually liked how he leads Mirabelle into the verbal trap of promising the baby, making her think he just wants riches, which makes her look better than a girl who outright promises her first born. Mirabelle spends most of the book terrified, but she doesn’t let that stop her from thinking or acting. The best shot was her face covered in tears after Rumpelstiltskin first asks for the baby, but her expression hardening as she determines to come up with a plan to stop him – she is afraid, but she is not going to be a damsel in distress. So overall, an ok but not great version of the tale.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Rosales

    Mirabelle has a big dilemma. Her father Daniel the Miller has gotten his family into a load of debt. King Konrad has ordered him to pay his debt or be a punished in prison. In all the excitement of not wanting to be a prisoner he tells the king his daughter can turn straw into gold. Mirabelle in order to save her father lies about her gift and tells the king that it is true. The king believes Mirabelle and gives her the challenge to make gold from straw. As she sits there crying because she know Mirabelle has a big dilemma. Her father Daniel the Miller has gotten his family into a load of debt. King Konrad has ordered him to pay his debt or be a punished in prison. In all the excitement of not wanting to be a prisoner he tells the king his daughter can turn straw into gold. Mirabelle in order to save her father lies about her gift and tells the king that it is true. The king believes Mirabelle and gives her the challenge to make gold from straw. As she sits there crying because she know it can’t be done, she is visited by a strange creature. He offers make the gold from straw for her necklace. As the days go on the king asks her to do it over and over, each time she makes deals with this creature. The king falls in love with her and her life is great, until the creature returns and wants her child to settle the debt. She refuses and is able to break the bond with the creature when she learns his name Rumpelstiltskin.

  7. 4 out of 5

    slieberman

    Martin Powell and Erik Valdez Y Alanis present the classic fairy tale Rumpelstiltskin in a non-traditional way. While the story is the traditional telling, the format of a graphic novel and the darker illustrations make this a perfect version for children of all ages. At the end of the story, the author includes a glossary, the history of the class story, discussion questions, writing prompts and even internet sites for further extension activities. These "extras" make this book ideal for classr Martin Powell and Erik Valdez Y Alanis present the classic fairy tale Rumpelstiltskin in a non-traditional way. While the story is the traditional telling, the format of a graphic novel and the darker illustrations make this a perfect version for children of all ages. At the end of the story, the author includes a glossary, the history of the class story, discussion questions, writing prompts and even internet sites for further extension activities. These "extras" make this book ideal for classroom use. Of course there are gaps in the story, such as any explanation of what made the king fall in love with the girl and change his greedy attitude. However, these gaps are also present in the classic version. I recommend this book for anyone looking for an original telling of the story in a non-traditional format.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dena

    Reading Level:2-5 I enjoyed the easy graphic novel format version of this traditional tale. I especially liked the stronger female role portrayed by the queen who instead of staying at home crying and sending out servants, she herself goes out to discover Rumpelstiltskins name! Go Girl! (I still question why she married the king who would have killed her). The gem eyed characters and easy graphic novel format are a draw for grade school readers. This is part of a set of traditional tales through S Reading Level:2-5 I enjoyed the easy graphic novel format version of this traditional tale. I especially liked the stronger female role portrayed by the queen who instead of staying at home crying and sending out servants, she herself goes out to discover Rumpelstiltskins name! Go Girl! (I still question why she married the king who would have killed her). The gem eyed characters and easy graphic novel format are a draw for grade school readers. This is part of a set of traditional tales through Stone Arch and constantly "off the shelves" at our school library. The end of the book contains a glossary, history of the traditional tale and good teacher suggestions for discussion and writing extensions.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I really liked this version...it sort of addressed my "why would anyone want to marry THAT guy?" question I had when I read a more traditional version of this to my daughter. I mean really, he's greedy and threatens to kill her if she doesn't spin straw into gold! Not my idea of good husband material. Anyway, it's pretty neatly tied up in this one--he gives all the money away to the poor, etc, a little unrealistic, but better than the other guy! I really liked this version...it sort of addressed my "why would anyone want to marry THAT guy?" question I had when I read a more traditional version of this to my daughter. I mean really, he's greedy and threatens to kill her if she doesn't spin straw into gold! Not my idea of good husband material. Anyway, it's pretty neatly tied up in this one--he gives all the money away to the poor, etc, a little unrealistic, but better than the other guy!

  10. 5 out of 5

    L12 VANESSA PEOPLESMARTIN

    This version of Rumpelstiltskin is a great graphic novel for lower grades. In the beginning of the book is a cast of characters. The book included a glossary, history of the original story, discusion questions, writing prompts, and internet sights. This is a great book to use in the classroom.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Miri

    It's strange that I like folk and fairy tales so much, considering how I despise the plot device of people falling in love at first sight. It's strange that I like folk and fairy tales so much, considering how I despise the plot device of people falling in love at first sight.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Fun version of a classic and the illustrations will captivate most kids.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    I thought this book was very similar to Beauty and the Beast: The Graphic Novel. The illustrations did little to keep me interested and the story felt forced and shortened.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Telela

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hakiah Taylor

  16. 5 out of 5

    S.K.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melody

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Quantum Thief - Spooky Ink Bandit Girl

  20. 5 out of 5

    harlequin {Stephanie}

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grace Hunt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  23. 4 out of 5

    tyler j l williams

  24. 4 out of 5

    susan ronald

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheri Chamberlain

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Ruhland

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth P

  29. 4 out of 5

    Casey Strauss

  30. 5 out of 5

    Timilyn

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