Hot Best Seller

The Second Summer of Love: How Dance Music Took Over the World

Availability: Ready to download

“The definitive look at dance music and club culture – a must read” Paul Oakenfold“Brilliantly woven collection of aural histories … a damn fine read!” DJ MAG In 1987, four friends from London, Paul Oakenfold, Danny Rampling, Nicky Holloway and Johnny Walker, took a week-long holiday to Ibiza. What they saw there, and brought back home, would give rise to a new global mu “The definitive look at dance music and club culture – a must read” Paul Oakenfold“Brilliantly woven collection of aural histories … a damn fine read!” DJ MAG In 1987, four friends from London, Paul Oakenfold, Danny Rampling, Nicky Holloway and Johnny Walker, took a week-long holiday to Ibiza. What they saw there, and brought back home, would give rise to a new global music and counterculture movement. As the eighties drew to their close, with Thatcherism holding the nation tight in its grip, something funny was happening right across the jungle of Britain's nightlife scene. People were dressing down, not up, to go to clubs. And they were dancing right through the night armed seemingly with only bottles of water. Ecstasy and acid house music had arrived on British shores, and a tribal battle between for the moral future of the nation, between the youth and the establishment, had begun..In The Second Summer of Love, author and dance music promoter Alon Shulman uses exclusive contributions from the world's biggest DJs, including Paul Oakenfold, Carl Cox, Fatboy Slim, Moby, Faithless, Mr C, Farley & Heller, Danny Rampling and many others to faithfully recreate the story of the summers of 1988 and 1989, and chart the birth and rise of Acid House, dance music and club culture right through to the modern day where dance music has become a culturally dominant global industry..Complete with stunning unseen photographs, this is the first authentic account of what really happened in that glorious period - from the politics and the people to the music, the drugs, the fashion and the culture - told by people who were there, as they bring to life the creation of an underground scene which inadvertently altered the course of modern global youth culture forever.


Compare

“The definitive look at dance music and club culture – a must read” Paul Oakenfold“Brilliantly woven collection of aural histories … a damn fine read!” DJ MAG In 1987, four friends from London, Paul Oakenfold, Danny Rampling, Nicky Holloway and Johnny Walker, took a week-long holiday to Ibiza. What they saw there, and brought back home, would give rise to a new global mu “The definitive look at dance music and club culture – a must read” Paul Oakenfold“Brilliantly woven collection of aural histories … a damn fine read!” DJ MAG In 1987, four friends from London, Paul Oakenfold, Danny Rampling, Nicky Holloway and Johnny Walker, took a week-long holiday to Ibiza. What they saw there, and brought back home, would give rise to a new global music and counterculture movement. As the eighties drew to their close, with Thatcherism holding the nation tight in its grip, something funny was happening right across the jungle of Britain's nightlife scene. People were dressing down, not up, to go to clubs. And they were dancing right through the night armed seemingly with only bottles of water. Ecstasy and acid house music had arrived on British shores, and a tribal battle between for the moral future of the nation, between the youth and the establishment, had begun..In The Second Summer of Love, author and dance music promoter Alon Shulman uses exclusive contributions from the world's biggest DJs, including Paul Oakenfold, Carl Cox, Fatboy Slim, Moby, Faithless, Mr C, Farley & Heller, Danny Rampling and many others to faithfully recreate the story of the summers of 1988 and 1989, and chart the birth and rise of Acid House, dance music and club culture right through to the modern day where dance music has become a culturally dominant global industry..Complete with stunning unseen photographs, this is the first authentic account of what really happened in that glorious period - from the politics and the people to the music, the drugs, the fashion and the culture - told by people who were there, as they bring to life the creation of an underground scene which inadvertently altered the course of modern global youth culture forever.

30 review for The Second Summer of Love: How Dance Music Took Over the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keen

    “Disco was creating a euphoric dancefloor atmosphere that was moving at about 120bpm. This speed, as it turns out, is the optimum tempo for dancing to, allowing the body to react to two beats per second. We now take this for granted and subconsciously dancefloors fill and stay full at 120bpm. This is the speed of the heartbeat at exercise and induces a trancelike primeval state that dancers can sustain for hours.” The general consensus seems to be that the Second Summer of Love took place in 1988 “Disco was creating a euphoric dancefloor atmosphere that was moving at about 120bpm. This speed, as it turns out, is the optimum tempo for dancing to, allowing the body to react to two beats per second. We now take this for granted and subconsciously dancefloors fill and stay full at 120bpm. This is the speed of the heartbeat at exercise and induces a trancelike primeval state that dancers can sustain for hours.” The general consensus seems to be that the Second Summer of Love took place in 1988, but of course there are many other claims from many other people. The origins ultimately lie within Ibiza and the so called Ibiza Four (I’d never heard them referred to as that before?) but just in case you aren’t familiar that consists of Oakenfold, Rampling, Holloway and Walker. The boys took a trip over to the Balearics back in the summer of 1987, where they were to have an encounter with an Argentinian by the name of DJ Alfredo Fiorito who was playing sets at the Amnesia club and the rest is, hype, myth and tall tales. You certainly can’t accuse Shulman over under selling the importance of his subject. He sounds like he is about to burst at the seams as he gushes about dance music being the greatest musical occurrence since rock n roll (some of the punk pioneers may have something to say about that?). Carl Cox is likened to an actual gladiator as he stands playing records?...But he covers most of the bases fairly well, but I would like to have seen a bit more depth and analysis, with less blokey chat and banter that seemed to cover the same ground, but I suppose that wasn’t the audience he was going for. He’s really good on MDMA and the back story into the origins of the first Summer of Love were interesting too, but there could have been more. There are some obvious comparisons to be made with “Last Night A D-J Saved My Life” except this seems to adopt a looser and less focused approach. There’s a real amateur copy and paste feel to this and it can feel like an extended Q&A magazine article. I did find myself cringing quite a lot. We often get bogged down in tedious crap, with lines like “Someone in the queue breaks wind-it’s an 8 out of 10, silent but deadly.” and many other silly and pointless diversions ensure that this history often loses focus at the expense of many failed attempts at humour. Ultimately this is crying out for a decent editor as all too often it dwindles into a group of middle age men (the occasional woman too!) rambling on too much about the old days, which grows dull quickly, especially when it starts to feel like every hour of every night is examined, revised and repackaged as an amazing night, which I am in no doubt it was if you were there, but if you were not, the points feel laboured and repetitive as so many inconsequential details are elevated into hugely significant events.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mr

    A very muddled book. Shulman can’t seem to decide whether to adopt a serious tone or a matey one. The whole thing is (perhaps understandably) a pretty rose tinted account of the rise of one of the most impactful scenes in British music. There’s a tendency to get a bit hagiographic and there’s very little truly insightful information. The oral history element of the book is the most successful aspect and it may have been worth focusing solely on this, although the vast majority of contributors we A very muddled book. Shulman can’t seem to decide whether to adopt a serious tone or a matey one. The whole thing is (perhaps understandably) a pretty rose tinted account of the rise of one of the most impactful scenes in British music. There’s a tendency to get a bit hagiographic and there’s very little truly insightful information. The oral history element of the book is the most successful aspect and it may have been worth focusing solely on this, although the vast majority of contributors were straight, white men meaning the experience of women, people of colour and the LGBT community was largely ignored.

  3. 4 out of 5

    marina botton

    Love this book Love reading this book, even though I didn't experience all of the episodes in this book, I did live though a few. A great read for our generation and the younger ones too, we were so lucky to have lived though such a wondered time, , and thank you for publishing this book, for me to have a journey down memory lane and beyond. If you lived it, buy t, if you love music, buy it. Either way, it will make you smile all the way through. Love this book Love reading this book, even though I didn't experience all of the episodes in this book, I did live though a few. A great read for our generation and the younger ones too, we were so lucky to have lived though such a wondered time, , and thank you for publishing this book, for me to have a journey down memory lane and beyond. If you lived it, buy t, if you love music, buy it. Either way, it will make you smile all the way through.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Guy Taylor

    This book would make an amazing documentary, but only an OK book. The content is wonderful, but the narrative is thin. It is a nostalgia more than a work of information. I was looking for how acid house evolved into what we know as electronic music today, it didn’t give me that. It gave me a whistle stop tour of names and clubs. It just didn’t live up to its potential.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Graham Cammock

    Sublime! Beautiful! This book is one of the most pleasurable books I have ever read. I was totally engrossed in it from start to finish. I can’t believe how ignorant I was about the origins of dance music. If you like any kind of electronic music at all, you’d be a fool not to read this amazing book! Get it now!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tommi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emma Burrows

  8. 5 out of 5

    mason bloom

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  10. 4 out of 5

    Victoria bookwormvix

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tronikyouth

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jules

  13. 5 out of 5

    Niall Stott

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zone Letting

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eli Parish

  16. 4 out of 5

    Keith Taylor

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matteo

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chloë

  20. 4 out of 5

    kirsty

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris Molloy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hugh

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Berwick

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Hodges

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rob Calcutt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danfisherj

  29. 5 out of 5

    jack

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gabby Humphreys

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...