30 review for Dear Big Gods (Pavilion Poetry)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Areeb Ahmad (Bankrupt_Bookworm)

    "I sit at the kitchen table where the light is best, where the light is. As mute as dawn, I blink her out, examine her hands, ink-stained and cold, her neck creaking like an iron hinge cooling on a gate. I search the patchpockets of her dress, full of tiny perforated shells and small yolk-coloured flowers ruining the lining and I run my fingers along her back and through her hair which flows like lava across her pale collarbones. When I flinch, she flinches, this soft girl, this churning broken song." // "Lik "I sit at the kitchen table where the light is best, where the light is. As mute as dawn, I blink her out, examine her hands, ink-stained and cold, her neck creaking like an iron hinge cooling on a gate. I search the patchpockets of her dress, full of tiny perforated shells and small yolk-coloured flowers ruining the lining and I run my fingers along her back and through her hair which flows like lava across her pale collarbones. When I flinch, she flinches, this soft girl, this churning broken song." // "Like the first morning" This is my first time ever reading Mona Arshi and I'm happy to report I really liked her. There is a thread of tenderness linking all these poems, they gently tug and turn, celebrating the small bigness of humanity. It is a record of our tiny acts reflected large, the looming shadows cast behind us. Arshi is searching for recognition through recollection, asking the universe to respond, enjoining the abyss to gaze back at us. Nature makes its presence known in her poems. Verses are entangled with branches, high boughs shade enjambments, critters of all kinds walk across the pages. So It is brimming with green, overflowing with it. Poems act as remembrance of the past and the mythic, transplanted on the present and the ordinary. Draupadi voicing her inner turmoil & Odysseus with paan-stained teeth, all find space to reside. Arshi plays a bit with form and structure too. An appreciable, intimate, often exquisite collection. Looking forward to more of her. (I received a finished copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josephine Corcoran

    The natural world infuses poems in Mona Arshi's second collection with mentions of birds, insects, flowers, trees, rivers, forests, ponds, earth. Flying and crawling insects make an appearance, sometimes landing gently on one line, sometimes swarming across whole pages. There are poems after Lorca and Emily Dickinson, and a playfully self-conscious scent of Louise Gluck's 'The Wild Iris' wafts through several poems when we are not sure who is speaking, flowers or the person observing them. Flash The natural world infuses poems in Mona Arshi's second collection with mentions of birds, insects, flowers, trees, rivers, forests, ponds, earth. Flying and crawling insects make an appearance, sometimes landing gently on one line, sometimes swarming across whole pages. There are poems after Lorca and Emily Dickinson, and a playfully self-conscious scent of Louise Gluck's 'The Wild Iris' wafts through several poems when we are not sure who is speaking, flowers or the person observing them. Flashes of humour, when they appear, sometimes in the saddest of times, are brilliant. "Have you ever ridden a penny farthing?" an obstetrician asks in 'Delivery Room'. "Is that important?" the poem's speaker replies, "Will I still get the morphine?". These poems spill over with intimate observations and the exquisite language that is Arshi's trademark. Readers who loved her first book will not be disappointed with her second. My full review is published in Under the Radar magazine, August 2019 and available online at ninearchespress.blogspot.com.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I loved the author’s debut novel, Somebody Loves You and I read a lot of poetry so I knew I had to check out her poetry collections. I plan to read Small Hands at some point as well. I really enjoyed this collection. The poems are filled with references to nature. I don’t usually enjoy nature poems but I enjoyed the structure and style of these poems. They are beautifully written. I especially liked Little Prayer, The Lilies and Mirrors. https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I loved the author’s debut novel, Somebody Loves You and I read a lot of poetry so I knew I had to check out her poetry collections. I plan to read Small Hands at some point as well. I really enjoyed this collection. The poems are filled with references to nature. I don’t usually enjoy nature poems but I enjoyed the structure and style of these poems. They are beautifully written. I especially liked Little Prayer, The Lilies and Mirrors.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This small collection of poetry covers a variety of topics. While a lot of them were filled with curious imagery, none of then connected strongly with me on a personal level. Many poems were visually arranged in an unusual way, and could be read in different ways.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Serge ♆ Neptune

    4.5 liked it a bit more than her debut collection.

  6. 5 out of 5

    dnote

    It is okay. Compared to her previous work, I did not like it that much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sanmeet

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura Devine

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pascale Petit

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jake Hall

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rhys Harding

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angel

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Mayne

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Martha

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rowyda Amin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dani Patterson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roisin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma Close

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alice Miller

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mel Pryor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Sykes

  28. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Linh Bolderston

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shivali

  30. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...