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The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook: 80 One-Pot Recipes to Nourish Your Family Using Your Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, or Sheet Pan

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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plant Paradox comes a guide to one-pot cooking for the whole family, with a special focus how to make the Plant Paradox program kid-friendly. Since the publication of The Plant Paradox in 2017, hundreds of thousands of people have embraced Dr. Gundry’s nutritional protocol—and experienced life-changing results. But most of D From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plant Paradox comes a guide to one-pot cooking for the whole family, with a special focus how to make the Plant Paradox program kid-friendly. Since the publication of The Plant Paradox in 2017, hundreds of thousands of people have embraced Dr. Gundry’s nutritional protocol—and experienced life-changing results. But most of Dr. Gundry’s readers aren’t cooking for themselves alone. “How can I extend this way of eating to my entire family? And is it safe for my kids?” are the questions he is most often asked.In The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook, Dr. Gundry reassures parents as he sets the record straight, providing an overview of children’s nutritional needs and explaining how we can help our kids thrive on the Plant Paradox program—a diet low in lectins. Dr. Gundry offers shocking evidence of how the Plant Paradox program is not only “safe” for kids, but also the best possible way to set them up for a lifetime of health and responsible eating. As research continues to bear out, a healthy microbiome—or “gut”—is the cornerstone of human health. The foods we eat at the beginning of our lives have a long-term impact on the makeup of our microbiome. Lectin-containing foods—such as grains, legumes, certain fruits and vegetables, and conventional dairy—damage it by creating holes in the gut wall and triggering the kind of systemic inflammation that lays the groundwork for disease. And yet, many of the foods we are routinely told to feed our children—think milk, whole grain bread, peanut butter—have an incredibly high lectin content.The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook includes more than 80 recipes that make cooking for a family a breeze. And since pressure cooking is the best and easiest way to reduce lectin content in foods like grains and beans, the majority of the quick and easy recipes are Instant-Pot friendly. From weeknight dinners to make-ahead breakfasts to snacks and even lunchbox-ready meals, The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook will help the whole family experience the incredible benefits of the Plant Paradox program.


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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plant Paradox comes a guide to one-pot cooking for the whole family, with a special focus how to make the Plant Paradox program kid-friendly. Since the publication of The Plant Paradox in 2017, hundreds of thousands of people have embraced Dr. Gundry’s nutritional protocol—and experienced life-changing results. But most of D From the New York Times bestselling author of The Plant Paradox comes a guide to one-pot cooking for the whole family, with a special focus how to make the Plant Paradox program kid-friendly. Since the publication of The Plant Paradox in 2017, hundreds of thousands of people have embraced Dr. Gundry’s nutritional protocol—and experienced life-changing results. But most of Dr. Gundry’s readers aren’t cooking for themselves alone. “How can I extend this way of eating to my entire family? And is it safe for my kids?” are the questions he is most often asked.In The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook, Dr. Gundry reassures parents as he sets the record straight, providing an overview of children’s nutritional needs and explaining how we can help our kids thrive on the Plant Paradox program—a diet low in lectins. Dr. Gundry offers shocking evidence of how the Plant Paradox program is not only “safe” for kids, but also the best possible way to set them up for a lifetime of health and responsible eating. As research continues to bear out, a healthy microbiome—or “gut”—is the cornerstone of human health. The foods we eat at the beginning of our lives have a long-term impact on the makeup of our microbiome. Lectin-containing foods—such as grains, legumes, certain fruits and vegetables, and conventional dairy—damage it by creating holes in the gut wall and triggering the kind of systemic inflammation that lays the groundwork for disease. And yet, many of the foods we are routinely told to feed our children—think milk, whole grain bread, peanut butter—have an incredibly high lectin content.The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook includes more than 80 recipes that make cooking for a family a breeze. And since pressure cooking is the best and easiest way to reduce lectin content in foods like grains and beans, the majority of the quick and easy recipes are Instant-Pot friendly. From weeknight dinners to make-ahead breakfasts to snacks and even lunchbox-ready meals, The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook will help the whole family experience the incredible benefits of the Plant Paradox program.

30 review for The Plant Paradox Family Cookbook: 80 One-Pot Recipes to Nourish Your Family Using Your Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, or Sheet Pan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Preachy. And I didn’t even get to the recipes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I have now read a few of Dr. Gundry's books. I understand his theories. But,if I only ate the vegetables he suggested, I would not be eating vegetables at all.Even when he suggests to eat in season fruits, I would have to give up most of the fruit I eat. I can follow my own regimen and those of other authors,but this one is quite difficult.Until about 30 years ago, we only had access to produce in season.I am grateful for the variety now available and not giving it up.This regimen is too restric I have now read a few of Dr. Gundry's books. I understand his theories. But,if I only ate the vegetables he suggested, I would not be eating vegetables at all.Even when he suggests to eat in season fruits, I would have to give up most of the fruit I eat. I can follow my own regimen and those of other authors,but this one is quite difficult.Until about 30 years ago, we only had access to produce in season.I am grateful for the variety now available and not giving it up.This regimen is too restrictive.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marcie

    I have read Dr. Gundry's other books and have been mostly following a lectin free diet for about ten months. It can get a little boring, it can be expensive, and it's daunting if you don't enjoy cooking, but eating this way has absolutely helped me with my auto-immune skin issues, not 100%, but quite a bit. I was hoping this book would add ease and creativity in the kitchen, and it has, a little. Like any cookbook, there are a few recipes that resonate and will become standards, and others that I have read Dr. Gundry's other books and have been mostly following a lectin free diet for about ten months. It can get a little boring, it can be expensive, and it's daunting if you don't enjoy cooking, but eating this way has absolutely helped me with my auto-immune skin issues, not 100%, but quite a bit. I was hoping this book would add ease and creativity in the kitchen, and it has, a little. Like any cookbook, there are a few recipes that resonate and will become standards, and others that don't interest me or are unnecessary to see in print. My biggest criticism is his random inconsistencies: all of a sudden he adds teff to the list of grains that are lectin free in one comment, and doesn't offer any recipe to use this tiny grain. Then in another recipe for poultry he mentions that kosher turkey is ok...since when and why is it suddenly acceptable rather than only pasture raised poultry? If he is so sure about his recommendations, they should be consistent and specific.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jodi Geever

    This book wasn’t what I expected, but there’s still value it. What’s on offer here is a catch all smattering of the trendiest cooking methods including sheet-pan dinners and the instant pot. The problem is that it’s a companion to a fairly restrictive bad foods/good foods type diet of the same name and, although I attempt to eat healthy, I mostly avoid super restrictive diets. The other issues I have with this book is that there aren’t too many recipes for any specific cooking method. There’s on This book wasn’t what I expected, but there’s still value it. What’s on offer here is a catch all smattering of the trendiest cooking methods including sheet-pan dinners and the instant pot. The problem is that it’s a companion to a fairly restrictive bad foods/good foods type diet of the same name and, although I attempt to eat healthy, I mostly avoid super restrictive diets. The other issues I have with this book is that there aren’t too many recipes for any specific cooking method. There’s only one short chapter of recipes for the instant pot for example. But I will try my hand at some of the dishes and I’m excited to devour the tikka masala, so this book earned 3 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    I did not find this book compatible with my approach to healthy eating and place where I live. Perhaps in California following Plant Paradox is achievable but still would be challenging. Here, in Alberta, excluding zucchinis and squash from my vegetable repertoire seems impossible. I did learn a few useful things like erithritol could be found as Swerva sweetener. I made coconut cookies but the recipe was calling for too much of coconut oil, the cookies didn't hold. I did not find this book compatible with my approach to healthy eating and place where I live. Perhaps in California following Plant Paradox is achievable but still would be challenging. Here, in Alberta, excluding zucchinis and squash from my vegetable repertoire seems impossible. I did learn a few useful things like erithritol could be found as Swerva sweetener. I made coconut cookies but the recipe was calling for too much of coconut oil, the cookies didn't hold.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Not a fan of this book. I definitely felt like I was being preached to and struggled getting through the constant statements like "The honest answer is..." and "From my experience..." I wanted scientific data to backup thoughts. I didn't think any of the recipes were worth adding to my collection either. Not a fan of this book. I definitely felt like I was being preached to and struggled getting through the constant statements like "The honest answer is..." and "From my experience..." I wanted scientific data to backup thoughts. I didn't think any of the recipes were worth adding to my collection either.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dahlgren General Library

    DA100000030025

  8. 5 out of 5

    George R. Joyner

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette Stocker

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie Khomme

  12. 5 out of 5

    C

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sepi Day

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Kluko

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ben Stewart

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nessa Dee

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shauna Bostian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Butcher

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rich

  22. 4 out of 5

    Renee

  23. 4 out of 5

    Klaus

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina Wedow

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Ann

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Apogée

  27. 4 out of 5

    Connie Hoffman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennampgmail.com

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

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