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It's So You: 35 Women Write about Personal Expression Through Fashion & Style

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It's So You explores the intersection between personal style and personal expression through lively personal essays by thirty-five top women writers—including two artists. In a culture that uses oppressive beauty standards to influence and determine what’s hot, how do women manage to find their own distinct style, and to delight in fashion, without feeling like they’re sel It's So You explores the intersection between personal style and personal expression through lively personal essays by thirty-five top women writers—including two artists. In a culture that uses oppressive beauty standards to influence and determine what’s hot, how do women manage to find their own distinct style, and to delight in fashion, without feeling like they’re selling out, or buying into consumerism? It's So You emerges from third-wave feminism, which celebrates not only the frivolity and playfulness of women’s fashion, but also the daring aesthetics of sex workers, out queers, and fashionistas. Contributors include Six Feet Under Producer Jill Soloway, transgender icon Kate Bornstein, Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon, poet Diane di Prima, NPR regular Sandra Tsing Loh, novelist Beth Lisick, Calvin Klein model Jenny Shimizu, actress Laura Fraser, and writer/herstorian Trina Robbins. From the haute couture houses of the ruling class to DIY girls who make restorative clothing and create their own hodgepodge style, It's So You is the first book to explore women’s ambivalence, suspicion, indulgence, and love of fashion on every level.


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It's So You explores the intersection between personal style and personal expression through lively personal essays by thirty-five top women writers—including two artists. In a culture that uses oppressive beauty standards to influence and determine what’s hot, how do women manage to find their own distinct style, and to delight in fashion, without feeling like they’re sel It's So You explores the intersection between personal style and personal expression through lively personal essays by thirty-five top women writers—including two artists. In a culture that uses oppressive beauty standards to influence and determine what’s hot, how do women manage to find their own distinct style, and to delight in fashion, without feeling like they’re selling out, or buying into consumerism? It's So You emerges from third-wave feminism, which celebrates not only the frivolity and playfulness of women’s fashion, but also the daring aesthetics of sex workers, out queers, and fashionistas. Contributors include Six Feet Under Producer Jill Soloway, transgender icon Kate Bornstein, Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon, poet Diane di Prima, NPR regular Sandra Tsing Loh, novelist Beth Lisick, Calvin Klein model Jenny Shimizu, actress Laura Fraser, and writer/herstorian Trina Robbins. From the haute couture houses of the ruling class to DIY girls who make restorative clothing and create their own hodgepodge style, It's So You is the first book to explore women’s ambivalence, suspicion, indulgence, and love of fashion on every level.

30 review for It's So You: 35 Women Write about Personal Expression Through Fashion & Style

  1. 5 out of 5

    Imogen

    Look, I really liked this book. A lot. I blew through it in a couple days. The stories tend to be kind of similar- "I was poor so my clothes were bad when I was little," or "I was fat so my clothes were bad when I was little," "but now I've figured out how to look fuckin great all the time." I don't care that they can be kind of similar though. One, there are a bunch of weird things that don't fit into that mold- my favorite of which is my girlfriend Ellen Forney's comicky piece about a dressup Look, I really liked this book. A lot. I blew through it in a couple days. The stories tend to be kind of similar- "I was poor so my clothes were bad when I was little," or "I was fat so my clothes were bad when I was little," "but now I've figured out how to look fuckin great all the time." I don't care that they can be kind of similar though. One, there are a bunch of weird things that don't fit into that mold- my favorite of which is my girlfriend Ellen Forney's comicky piece about a dressup gender-nonspecific person, but I'm biased, because Ellen Forney is my girlfriend*- but more importantly, two, it is a fuckin great, important story that I want to hear as many times as I can. The reason it's not a five star book is one sentence. Sherilynn Connelly writes that, when she started trying to present female after presenting male her whole life, she was 'like a dog who thinks it is a person.' Maybe that's what your experience felt like, but no. Veto. A dog is unlikely to become a person; someone assigned male can often become (or: sometimes already is) female. Everyone who tries to present differently than they're used to fucks it up at first. But you knew I was gonna be hard on the trans woman before I even started talking. So. I'm fuckin grumpy about trans stuff though and I hate everybody who writes about it. Except Kate Bornstein, apparently. Anyway, yeah, four stars. I still have a book crush on Michelle Tea. *not really. Jesus. Don't take everything so seriously.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This books gets two stars because it made me sad. I guess I'm just shocked that people have so much choice in what they wear. Hate to be a downer, but I consider myself lucky if I find something that fits and looks at all decent. I can't afford to limit myself to a particular style. One story in this book really epitomizes the issue for me - One woman can't find any clothes that look nice because she's fat. But then she discovers shoes! And shoes are wonderful for her because it doesn't matter how This books gets two stars because it made me sad. I guess I'm just shocked that people have so much choice in what they wear. Hate to be a downer, but I consider myself lucky if I find something that fits and looks at all decent. I can't afford to limit myself to a particular style. One story in this book really epitomizes the issue for me - One woman can't find any clothes that look nice because she's fat. But then she discovers shoes! And shoes are wonderful for her because it doesn't matter how fat she is, she can still find tons of awesome shoes to fit her and it's wonderful and happy. I feel like that, except shoes don't fit me either. Maybe it's my own fault for reading a book about fashion. But so many of the stories came soclose to addressing this issue but then didn't. So it makes me feel sad that I can't be fashionable! Even in comparison to all these women who are like, "I was sooo unfashionable, but then I became awesome." And that is why it gets two stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Allison Floyd

    At one point or another, it's likely we have all thought to ourselves, "Let's get ready to look soooooo good!" This book talks about that process--the personal and political narratives behind it--making it simultaneously Deep and Fun. It's the escapist lit equivalent of a delectable baked good in which some of the butter has been replaced by applesauce and in which the quality of the end result has miraculously not suffered. Perfect for the airport! At one point or another, it's likely we have all thought to ourselves, "Let's get ready to look soooooo good!" This book talks about that process--the personal and political narratives behind it--making it simultaneously Deep and Fun. It's the escapist lit equivalent of a delectable baked good in which some of the butter has been replaced by applesauce and in which the quality of the end result has miraculously not suffered. Perfect for the airport!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Fashion is a feminist issue. Queer-lit icon Michelle Tea and 35 other feisty fashionistas explain why. Six Feet Under writer/producer Jill Soloway; Sonic Youth’s bassist Kim Gordon; transgender author, performer and gender theorist Kate Bornstein; writer Trina Robbins; novelist Beth Lisick and other fashionable females offer insight into identity and creativity as expressions in sartorial style. Artists Nicole J. Georges and Ellen Forney also offer up their visual take. Gordon, perhaps inspired b Fashion is a feminist issue. Queer-lit icon Michelle Tea and 35 other feisty fashionistas explain why. Six Feet Under writer/producer Jill Soloway; Sonic Youth’s bassist Kim Gordon; transgender author, performer and gender theorist Kate Bornstein; writer Trina Robbins; novelist Beth Lisick and other fashionable females offer insight into identity and creativity as expressions in sartorial style. Artists Nicole J. Georges and Ellen Forney also offer up their visual take. Gordon, perhaps inspired by living in Sylvia Plath’s old homestead in North Hampton, Massachusetts, pens a provocative critique on the clitoris, “Lipstock.” More brash than the late poetess, the musician’s view of current celebrities’ anti-panty paparazzi poses---offers a memorable take on vulgarization of the vulva. Bornstein’s “Betsey Girls Saved My Life” begins with the author’s childhood crush on a James Dean-ian boy wonder, tells how bellbottoms kept her out of Vietnam and follows her through a 12-year stint with the Church of Scientology. But it is the femmes and butches of Seattle---post-sex-reassignment surgery---who iron everything out and save her wardrobe. This is an ode to designer Betsey Johnson, who drags sexuality from the closets and slaps it on our backs.

  5. 4 out of 5

    WORN Fashion Journal

    After getting past the hokey title, It's So You proved to be an engaging, insightful, and funny read - the type of book that makes you miss your stop on the subway because you are so engrossed in the text. It's composed of 35 essays about developing one's personal style and though some of the pieces are better than others, there is hardly a dud in the collection. Intelligent women with accomplished resumés and voices often marginalized in mainstream fashion share their stories in a way that read After getting past the hokey title, It's So You proved to be an engaging, insightful, and funny read - the type of book that makes you miss your stop on the subway because you are so engrossed in the text. It's composed of 35 essays about developing one's personal style and though some of the pieces are better than others, there is hardly a dud in the collection. Intelligent women with accomplished resumés and voices often marginalized in mainstream fashion share their stories in a way that reads more like a diary entry than an academic essay. Rather than taking on a self-indulgent tone, the bulk of the essays examine the ways in which style intersects with class, race, age, weight, gender identity and presentation, sexual orientation, or political beliefs. Most of the stories would not be out of place in the pages of WORN. If my infinite-thumbs up is not enough to encourage you to pick up this book, perhaps the roster of contributors will do the trick: Sonic Youth bassist Kim Gordon, beatnik poet Diane di Prima, author and activist Kate Bornstein, and fashion designer Parisa Parnian all make an appearance. (reviewed by Anna Fitzpatrick)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book is what I wish "The Bigger the Better the Tighter the Sweater" had been. It's another series of essays, this time loosely based around fashion and how we construct our identities visually. I thought it was a little heavy on the number of essays by gay folks trying to figure out how to dress (I related more to the essays on feminism vs. fashion - can you be into both?), but overall both an entertaining and thoughtful read. Makes me want to hit my favorite thrift stores right now! This book is what I wish "The Bigger the Better the Tighter the Sweater" had been. It's another series of essays, this time loosely based around fashion and how we construct our identities visually. I thought it was a little heavy on the number of essays by gay folks trying to figure out how to dress (I related more to the essays on feminism vs. fashion - can you be into both?), but overall both an entertaining and thoughtful read. Makes me want to hit my favorite thrift stores right now!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Northrup

    Fashion lit without guilt! Picked it up because it included Sandra Tsing Loh. Only recognized three or four other names, but particularly enjoyed Sherilyn Connelly and Nicole Georges. (In fact, I came across a Georges book two days after reading this and thus bought it.) There were definitely repeating themes and tones, but I was expecting that. Good balance of humor and anger. It helped that I'm about the same age of a lot of the writers, in terms of fashion memories. Fashion lit without guilt! Picked it up because it included Sandra Tsing Loh. Only recognized three or four other names, but particularly enjoyed Sherilyn Connelly and Nicole Georges. (In fact, I came across a Georges book two days after reading this and thus bought it.) There were definitely repeating themes and tones, but I was expecting that. Good balance of humor and anger. It helped that I'm about the same age of a lot of the writers, in terms of fashion memories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    A wonderful read. As the subtitle says, the book features 35 women (at least three of them from Portland) writing about how fashion influenced their lives. For some it was an afterthought; for others, it had a massive impact on their self image and/or their relationship with the world. Fashion is the lens through which these fascinating women analyze gender, sexuality, growing up, work and so forth.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    It took me so long to finish this because I really liked it and didn't want it to end. Would love to read a thousand more essays about how women relate to fashion, how it shapes them, how they shape it, etc. The more academically-inclined pieces were not nearly as interesting as the funny, anecdotal ones but maybe I'm just too far removed from academia to appreciate that stuff anymore. I want all of my friends to write their own essays on this theme. It took me so long to finish this because I really liked it and didn't want it to end. Would love to read a thousand more essays about how women relate to fashion, how it shapes them, how they shape it, etc. The more academically-inclined pieces were not nearly as interesting as the funny, anecdotal ones but maybe I'm just too far removed from academia to appreciate that stuff anymore. I want all of my friends to write their own essays on this theme.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Denisebilbao

    the cintra wilson essay is genius.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    I must begin by saying I Did Not Finish this book. But I did get through the first good number or stories before I knew I could not go on. A collection of personal stories of fashion frustration turned to seeming fashion acceptance. These stories just didn't work for me and I so wanted them to. The vignettes felt angsty and hastily written. One or two stories like that would have been fine, but I read through the first five or so and they all felt so similar. A woman struggled with fashion and dec I must begin by saying I Did Not Finish this book. But I did get through the first good number or stories before I knew I could not go on. A collection of personal stories of fashion frustration turned to seeming fashion acceptance. These stories just didn't work for me and I so wanted them to. The vignettes felt angsty and hastily written. One or two stories like that would have been fine, but I read through the first five or so and they all felt so similar. A woman struggled with fashion and decides "Fuck it, I just want to be comfortable. Don't judge me." I wish that just one of the stories (in the first half) had a woman who was initially frustrated, but then began to enjoy and embrace -- mainstream fashion. I understand that fashion is an expression of self, and part of that self-expression can be not wanting to participate in fashion or being judged. I'm totally okay with that. What bothered me most was that so many of these women were so frustrated, and I didn't feel true resolution. They just dealt with fashion. And that can be cathartic for someone to read if they are also struggling with fashion. It's nice to know you're not alone in disliking something. It's nice to know you CAN reject fashion.This book might have resonated with me a decade ago. But this book doesn't show how to struggle and then thrive, beyond saying "Fuck it." The "acceptance" and success the women show allllmost feels like giving up. Repeatedly. Story after story. Even though it kinda is success. But it also kinda isn't. And that's what really bothered me. So I don't want to sound like I think all women need to be fashionistas. That's not it. I also don't want to suggest being "fashionable" can only look like one or two or twenty things. I just wish the fashion failures and fashion fuck-its were balanced with some fashion fun and fabulousness. So, I didn't like it. But you might. Bottom line: If you're mired in fashion frustration, you may find some solace in these pages, but don't expect solutions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    I was really excited about this book because I love fashion but not in a name-brand labels kind of way, and this was a bunch of essays from indie-hipster-type women, transsexuals, and others about their love of, hate for, and struggles with fashion. But it wasn't as good as I was hoping. There are a few excellent essays--I particularly enjoyed one by a male-to-female transsexual about the problems of being too big to buy women's clothing. But too many of them fell into that "I'm cooler than you b I was really excited about this book because I love fashion but not in a name-brand labels kind of way, and this was a bunch of essays from indie-hipster-type women, transsexuals, and others about their love of, hate for, and struggles with fashion. But it wasn't as good as I was hoping. There are a few excellent essays--I particularly enjoyed one by a male-to-female transsexual about the problems of being too big to buy women's clothing. But too many of them fell into that "I'm cooler than you because I was around when punks wore safety pins because their clothes were literally falling apart and we shopped at thrift stores because we were poor and living in squats on the Lower East Side while shooting heroin and being very, very countercultural and cool." While I'm not into labels or haute couture, it seems a little sad to be in your 50s or 60s and still sniffy about how much cooler you are because you dug your shirt out of a dumpster. That said, I'm a total hypocrite because I'm always so proud of how cheap the clothes I wear are. And I would totally dig a cool shirt out of a dumpster. I would not, however, wear polyester '60s-era dresses just because I found them cheap at Salvation Army. So basically, there are a few gems but a lot of skip-able essays here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Meng

    I actually didn't finish this. It became really repetitive about 9 chapters in. These aren't essays (I don't know why I thought they would be) they are short memoirs that mainly (of the 9 I read) concern 30-somethings who were outcasts in junior high, discovered thrift stores/their sexual preferences in high school, tried to fit in/discovered thrift stores or their sexual preference/dropped out of college/started their own one-woman show/zine/band in their 20s, and are now plagued by the fact th I actually didn't finish this. It became really repetitive about 9 chapters in. These aren't essays (I don't know why I thought they would be) they are short memoirs that mainly (of the 9 I read) concern 30-somethings who were outcasts in junior high, discovered thrift stores/their sexual preferences in high school, tried to fit in/discovered thrift stores or their sexual preference/dropped out of college/started their own one-woman show/zine/band in their 20s, and are now plagued by the fact that they have "real jobs" and money and live in San Francisco. Lots of retellings of "shocking" fashion attempts & triumphs. Kim Gordon's piece is the exception. It is a wildly accurate critique of young Hollywood's recent penchant for exposing their privates & a deft commentary on the current obsession with celebrity & shock. This is the one piece that actually takes a deeper look at what "fashion" means, particularly to our culture & it made me wish that others had stepped away from the personal anecdotes & got into the deeper questions around beauty, aesthetics, and( hello!) consumerism.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Okay, so I don't care about people's personal style unless they dress like a weirdo, but Nicole G. had some shit in this book and it is Atsuko's copy. There is a queer/feminist girl's English book swap in Japan. WTF!!!! My favorite story in here was by Chelsea Starr, who I have (duh) since Googled and whatever. She writes about growing up poor and the clothes you have to wear when you can't help it, and how people treat you because of it. While I simultaneously do and don't identify as working c Okay, so I don't care about people's personal style unless they dress like a weirdo, but Nicole G. had some shit in this book and it is Atsuko's copy. There is a queer/feminist girl's English book swap in Japan. WTF!!!! My favorite story in here was by Chelsea Starr, who I have (duh) since Googled and whatever. She writes about growing up poor and the clothes you have to wear when you can't help it, and how people treat you because of it. While I simultaneously do and don't identify as working class, I definitely overintellectualize my family to the point of it not even being my own story, but I think many of us know what it feels like to have shame based on something you can't help. Growing up and being able to get out of that is about the most powerful and magical thing in the world. Another story I really liked was by Eileen Myles. I love tuff women who talk about wearing nice suits with sandals (=boner town, USA). Cool.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Some essays were OK, and some were thrown together from random musings that never formed a cohesive piece. More of the authors seemed to be rebelling against the oppressive side of style and fashion, eschewing it for an excuse to wear the ridiculous, rather than examining how fashion connects. Although now that I consider the title, I see that "personal expression" is the theme. So perhaps the misunderstaning is mine, because I see style as a common-language that we all get to parse differently Some essays were OK, and some were thrown together from random musings that never formed a cohesive piece. More of the authors seemed to be rebelling against the oppressive side of style and fashion, eschewing it for an excuse to wear the ridiculous, rather than examining how fashion connects. Although now that I consider the title, I see that "personal expression" is the theme. So perhaps the misunderstaning is mine, because I see style as a common-language that we all get to parse differently to put our personal messages together, and many of these authors feel they can put whatever random shit they find on the street or at the bottom of the closet together to invent their own language which they call "style" (rather than "sloppy" or "crazy town").

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    Rarely do I give up on a book and not finish it. This is just one of those ones I couldn't get into. Maybe I wasn't in the right mindset to appreciate it at this point in my life. The label on the back of the book was "BEAUTY". I almost scratched it out and wrote "FEMINISM" in its place. I'm a feminist to a certain degree, but some of the essays in this collection were too radical for me to relate to. It would be a great book for a women's studies class, but just didn't do anything for me. I put Rarely do I give up on a book and not finish it. This is just one of those ones I couldn't get into. Maybe I wasn't in the right mindset to appreciate it at this point in my life. The label on the back of the book was "BEAUTY". I almost scratched it out and wrote "FEMINISM" in its place. I'm a feminist to a certain degree, but some of the essays in this collection were too radical for me to relate to. It would be a great book for a women's studies class, but just didn't do anything for me. I put it up on bookmooch.com and it's being mailed off today--hopefully that person likes it a lot more than I did.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liza

    I really really enjoyed this book! Like some of the essays were shit but I fucking loved some of them - I have drawn hearts in the contents next to Michelle Tea, Felicia Luna Lemus, Cookie Woolner, Nicole J. Georges, Chelsea Starr, Trina Robbins, Sherilyn Connelly, Jewelle Gomez, Silja J. A. Talvi and Rhiannon Argo. It was so fucking awesome READING about STYLE and CLOTHES and SHOES and oh my god it's kinda like my perfect femme book. Also I'd not read *anything* by Michelle Tea before and I lov I really really enjoyed this book! Like some of the essays were shit but I fucking loved some of them - I have drawn hearts in the contents next to Michelle Tea, Felicia Luna Lemus, Cookie Woolner, Nicole J. Georges, Chelsea Starr, Trina Robbins, Sherilyn Connelly, Jewelle Gomez, Silja J. A. Talvi and Rhiannon Argo. It was so fucking awesome READING about STYLE and CLOTHES and SHOES and oh my god it's kinda like my perfect femme book. Also I'd not read *anything* by Michelle Tea before and I loved her piece so much, she writes like a dream, so I really wanna read more of her stuff. I have The Chelsea Whistle on my bookshelf so maybe I'll read that one soon. Yay!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    well so far i read my own essay and cintra wilson's, plus I got to hear Beth Lissick read hers which was complex and stealthy, and that Trish Robbins has a piece about As Is, this Goodwill outlet with bins that is disarmingly filthy. I think Trish Robbins might actually be wierder than me, though about 5 times more productive. She did this little book on Women Who Kill for Red Wheel Weiser/Cunari that is cute as a button. She had a handsome hippy of a certain age with her. well so far i read my own essay and cintra wilson's, plus I got to hear Beth Lissick read hers which was complex and stealthy, and that Trish Robbins has a piece about As Is, this Goodwill outlet with bins that is disarmingly filthy. I think Trish Robbins might actually be wierder than me, though about 5 times more productive. She did this little book on Women Who Kill for Red Wheel Weiser/Cunari that is cute as a button. She had a handsome hippy of a certain age with her.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Wow, I'm reeling from all the stories in the anthology. It's HUGE! I really did like the experience of reading it and recognizing myself in some of the essays. They're all kind of blending together- but like some of the other reviewers, I'd want more diversity in a future or second edition. Also perhaps more descriptive/practical essays about making clothing/conscious construction of clothing and outfits. Wow, I'm reeling from all the stories in the anthology. It's HUGE! I really did like the experience of reading it and recognizing myself in some of the essays. They're all kind of blending together- but like some of the other reviewers, I'd want more diversity in a future or second edition. Also perhaps more descriptive/practical essays about making clothing/conscious construction of clothing and outfits.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This is an interesting look at how people change themselves through clothes, though I wish there had been more variation in the subjects. Halfway through the book, it started to seem like every story was about a lesbian who used to be very heavy (Lane Bryant shopping, etc.) and confused about gender identify but then, through clothes, found a way to understand and present herself.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Very heavy on lesbian, San Franciscans writers, but with Michelle Tea as editor I guess that's not so surprising. Not many (any?) of these authors echoed my own experiences, but still a fairly entertaining read. Very heavy on lesbian, San Franciscans writers, but with Michelle Tea as editor I guess that's not so surprising. Not many (any?) of these authors echoed my own experiences, but still a fairly entertaining read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pamster

    Awesome ladies writing about gender identity, class, body issues, sex, and a million other things through the lens of personal fashion. Loved it even more than I thought I would. Would've edited out a couple near the back, but whatevs. Still so awesome. Awesome ladies writing about gender identity, class, body issues, sex, and a million other things through the lens of personal fashion. Loved it even more than I thought I would. Would've edited out a couple near the back, but whatevs. Still so awesome.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    A really fun romp through various women's stories about personal style and influences. Loved the Bowie nod by one author. Great fun. Amazing how music, war, parents, hobbies, make-up, motherhood and men influence what we wear. Fun fast read. Check it out! A really fun romp through various women's stories about personal style and influences. Loved the Bowie nod by one author. Great fun. Amazing how music, war, parents, hobbies, make-up, motherhood and men influence what we wear. Fun fast read. Check it out!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jayne Lamb

    2.5 stars : like any essay collection, there's some interesting, sharp stuff, some absolute duds, and plenty of "meh". Still a fun topic that isn't often pursued enough through feminist/queer lenses, so you'll resonate with at least a few. 2.5 stars : like any essay collection, there's some interesting, sharp stuff, some absolute duds, and plenty of "meh". Still a fun topic that isn't often pursued enough through feminist/queer lenses, so you'll resonate with at least a few.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jane Rosario

    The essays were very repetitive with only an exception or two. Not recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lita

    I was skeptical, but this is a surprisingly good, creative collection of 35 essays on the subject of clothes and womens relationship to them. I got a kick out of it; good entertainment reading.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carissa

    the forward is the best. everything else is fun, but just read the forward and you will be set.

  28. 4 out of 5

    jessica wilson

    an interesting mix of commentary though i was slightly disappointed in the quality of the writing. only slightly.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I'm not the target demographic & I don't care much about fashion but I still enjoyed reading about half of these essays (like Mary Woronov's anti-t-shirt rant). I'm not the target demographic & I don't care much about fashion but I still enjoyed reading about half of these essays (like Mary Woronov's anti-t-shirt rant).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Lund

    Bunch of alternagirl/gutter punk/fat positivist feminists write about clothes. Pretty awesome, and made me jealous of their self-expression/free careers/ability to find awesome clothes.

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