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Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys: Race and Gender Disparity in Urban Education

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This book is an ethnographic study of Carribean youth in New York City to help explain how and why schools and cities are failing boys of color.


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This book is an ethnographic study of Carribean youth in New York City to help explain how and why schools and cities are failing boys of color.

51 review for Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys: Race and Gender Disparity in Urban Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marlene Rosa

    Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys is an ethnographic book that focuses on the educational experiences of second generation Caribbean students, particularly Dominican, West Indian, and Haitian students in New York City. Nancy Lopez is the author of this book, can also to relate to the focus group of this group since she is also a Dominican who was raised and attended school in New York City. Lopez bases her book around the race-gender framework, throughout her book she argues how race and gender deter Hopeful Girls, Troubled Boys is an ethnographic book that focuses on the educational experiences of second generation Caribbean students, particularly Dominican, West Indian, and Haitian students in New York City. Nancy Lopez is the author of this book, can also to relate to the focus group of this group since she is also a Dominican who was raised and attended school in New York City. Lopez bases her book around the race-gender framework, throughout her book she argues how race and gender determines the type of education her focus group received. In her book, Lopez attempts to demonstrate how race and gender how girls and boys from the same ethnic backgrounds and socioeconomic status and neighborhood have different attainments and attitudes towards education. Although Lopez makes great points for her arguments, she left out many voices of those in her focus group. Overall, Lopez gives good accounts of the experiences of second generation Caribbean students. Included other factors that shape these experiences, could have helped develop and have made the book more thorough and detailed giving readers an expanded version of information that is already out there.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wes

    I enjoyed reading this book. It gives an interesting perspective into the education process for some students. I wish that I had read this book earlier. It did leave me with some questions as to what has changed in the time since it was written. One thing to note about the book is that it is not as encompassing as the title suggests. It is about specific 2nd generation minorities in a certain part of NYC. That being said, a lot can be learned from that. However, the story is not the same in urba I enjoyed reading this book. It gives an interesting perspective into the education process for some students. I wish that I had read this book earlier. It did leave me with some questions as to what has changed in the time since it was written. One thing to note about the book is that it is not as encompassing as the title suggests. It is about specific 2nd generation minorities in a certain part of NYC. That being said, a lot can be learned from that. However, the story is not the same in urban education everywhere. But there are some things that are the same. It is notable how boys and girls are treated differently both in the home and at school. I am left with questions for me in how I am treating boys and girls. I definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in education or in race/gender equality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    a

    Interesting ethnography about the ways race and gender structure experiences for Caribbean girls and boys in ways that have implications for their educational trajectories. Includes a chapter on family which adds to the small body of work suggesting the significant costs of male privilege for boys of color. Useful paired with books that focus only on gender in schools (or only on race).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alix Rowe

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erika

  6. 4 out of 5

    A. Cox

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Langhammer

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dioscita

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alma Campuzano

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lata

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  17. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tenzin Sherab

  19. 4 out of 5

    Isabelia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Candace Sumner

  23. 5 out of 5

    Serena

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian Danielak

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn Cameron

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mouhamadou Diagne

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Anne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin Schilling

  31. 4 out of 5

    Davey

  32. 4 out of 5

    Joe Thomas

  33. 5 out of 5

    Justme

  34. 4 out of 5

    Brigindo

  35. 5 out of 5

    Lrybolt

  36. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  37. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

  39. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Lauren

  40. 5 out of 5

    Ratna King

  41. 5 out of 5

    Loren

  42. 5 out of 5

    Machel Lucas

  43. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  44. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  45. 5 out of 5

    Erendira

  46. 5 out of 5

    Erika Peterson

  47. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

  48. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Bridges

  49. 4 out of 5

    Bere V Nava

  50. 5 out of 5

    KatGo

  51. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Espinoza

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