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Bad Girls of the Bible: And What We Can Learn from Them

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Women everywhere marvel at those good girls in Scripture--Sarah, Mary, Esther--but on most days, that's not who they see when they look in the mirror. Most women (if they're honest) see the selfishness of Sapphira or the deception of Delilah. They catch of glimpse of Jezebel's take-charge pride or Eve's disastrous disobedience. Like Bathsheba, Herodias, and the rest, today Women everywhere marvel at those good girls in Scripture--Sarah, Mary, Esther--but on most days, that's not who they see when they look in the mirror. Most women (if they're honest) see the selfishness of Sapphira or the deception of Delilah. They catch of glimpse of Jezebel's take-charge pride or Eve's disastrous disobedience. Like Bathsheba, Herodias, and the rest, today's modern woman is surrounded by temptations, exhausted by the demands of daily living, and burdened by her own desires. So what's a good girl to do? Learn from their lives, says beloved humor writer Liz Curtis Higgs, and by God's grace, choose a better path. In Bad Girls of the Bible, Higgs offers a unique and clear-sighted approach to understanding those other women in Scripture, combining a contemporary retelling of their stories with a solid, verse-by-verse study of their mistakes and what lessons women today can learn from them. Whether they were Bad to the Bone, Bad for a Season, but Not Forever or only Bad for a Moment, these infamous sisters show women how not to handle the challenges of life. With her trademark humor and encouragement, Liz Curtis Higgs teaches us how to avoid their tragic mistakes and joyfully embrace grace.


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Women everywhere marvel at those good girls in Scripture--Sarah, Mary, Esther--but on most days, that's not who they see when they look in the mirror. Most women (if they're honest) see the selfishness of Sapphira or the deception of Delilah. They catch of glimpse of Jezebel's take-charge pride or Eve's disastrous disobedience. Like Bathsheba, Herodias, and the rest, today Women everywhere marvel at those good girls in Scripture--Sarah, Mary, Esther--but on most days, that's not who they see when they look in the mirror. Most women (if they're honest) see the selfishness of Sapphira or the deception of Delilah. They catch of glimpse of Jezebel's take-charge pride or Eve's disastrous disobedience. Like Bathsheba, Herodias, and the rest, today's modern woman is surrounded by temptations, exhausted by the demands of daily living, and burdened by her own desires. So what's a good girl to do? Learn from their lives, says beloved humor writer Liz Curtis Higgs, and by God's grace, choose a better path. In Bad Girls of the Bible, Higgs offers a unique and clear-sighted approach to understanding those other women in Scripture, combining a contemporary retelling of their stories with a solid, verse-by-verse study of their mistakes and what lessons women today can learn from them. Whether they were Bad to the Bone, Bad for a Season, but Not Forever or only Bad for a Moment, these infamous sisters show women how not to handle the challenges of life. With her trademark humor and encouragement, Liz Curtis Higgs teaches us how to avoid their tragic mistakes and joyfully embrace grace.

30 review for Bad Girls of the Bible: And What We Can Learn from Them

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    I remember picking this up at the grocery store -- I think it was the cover, intrigued me. In any case -- I am NOT a Christian, not even close, however, with that stated, here are my thoughts on this excellent book: She has the chapters (a prologue, a chapter devoted to each "Bad Girl", and an epilogue) separated into the fiction story -- the Bible's version (with amusing comments ala Elvira or perhaps Mystery Science Theater provided by her) -- the lessons learned from the fable -- and questions I remember picking this up at the grocery store -- I think it was the cover, intrigued me. In any case -- I am NOT a Christian, not even close, however, with that stated, here are my thoughts on this excellent book: She has the chapters (a prologue, a chapter devoted to each "Bad Girl", and an epilogue) separated into the fiction story -- the Bible's version (with amusing comments ala Elvira or perhaps Mystery Science Theater provided by her) -- the lessons learned from the fable -- and questions for discussion. Nice. I didn't read the questions for discussion -- but the other stuff was nice. The book is sprinkled with quotes, both from the Bible and from without -- I had a few I particularly liked (even one from the Bible, go figure) "Heaven has no rage like love to hatred turned, Nor hell a fury like a woman scorned." -- William Congreve "That money talks I'll not deny, I heard it once: It said 'Goodbye'" -- Richard Armour "The rooster may crow, but the hen delivers the goods." -- Ann Richards "Your beauty should not come from outward adornment....Instead, it should be that of your inner self, the unfading beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is of great worth in God's sight." 1 Peter 3:3-4 And the lessons I took from the "Bad Girls" (I keep putting them in quotes because she includes Michal in that category, and she was not bad -- misguided. Loved her father. Infatuated young thing? not bad) From Eve: Avoid the blame game (always good advice, and something people really need to pay more attention to -- just because your child listens to Rock, or watches TV or plays video games does not excuse his/her actions -- or yours for that matter...take some responsibility already! geeesh) From Potiphar's Wife (is it odd that the Bible doesn't give some of these women names?): Surround ourselves with support and Confession beats a cover-up (just ask Nixon) From Lot's Wife: Stuff is temporary (now while I do love my stuff, and would have a very hard time letting it go - it is stuff...my life and the lives of my loved ones is much more important) From the Woman at the Well: Never be afraid to ask questions (how many teachers have said this very thing??) From Delilah: The love of a man is to be treasured (I will add...the love of anyone is to be treasured -- it is a rare gift for anyone to give you their love) From Sapphira: Learn to give when nobody's looking (anonymous charity is a special thing --) From Rahab: Our past does not determine our future From Jezebel: No one wants to work for a witch (my addition is, a bitch really not a witch per say, if you treat those who serve you poorly, they will remember -- and I don't just mean those who are lucky enough to afford SERVANTS -- the waitress you were mean to, remember she sees your food before you do...) From "The Sinful Woman" (the one who anointed Jesus' feet with her tears and dried them with her hair): People will talk, no matter what we do I would also like to commend the author, not only is she a really good story teller, and able to make the Bible interesting and understandable, but she is a former Bad Girl, and isn't afraid to say that sometimes she still missteps. She is honest and human, and a "religious freak" by her own admission. Refreshing that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Just a Girl Fighting Censorship

    Allow me to preface the following comments by saying that if someone enjoyed reading this and it taught them something about God or brought them closer to God, that’s great and I don’t want to take away from their experience but…. This book is AWFUL, terribly written. The idea is fantastic, looking at the worst women in the bible and finding out why they are in there, genius. The only problem is that instead of telling these women’s stories the author comes up with fiction stories, no more like f Allow me to preface the following comments by saying that if someone enjoyed reading this and it taught them something about God or brought them closer to God, that’s great and I don’t want to take away from their experience but…. This book is AWFUL, terribly written. The idea is fantastic, looking at the worst women in the bible and finding out why they are in there, genius. The only problem is that instead of telling these women’s stories the author comes up with fiction stories, no more like fictionalized versions of the biblical stories but with different names and writing equivalent to a BAD romance novel. The author should have done one of two things: presented the actual stories from the bible just written in a more palatable style or, created completely different stories that can be used as parables or modern metaphors for these biblical stories. This author took Shakespeare and made it into a Lifetime movie…for shame. HUGE LETDOWN

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    You might think, given the format of this book (short fictional stories of modern women followed by short character studies of BIble women) that it's a light read or a shallow Bible study with no more depth than the latest novel. But in reality, Liz Curtis Higgs, the author, has studied these Bible women extensively, and her study is evident in the lessons found in this book. The fictional stories add a dimension to the women in the Bible that we thought we knew. The Bible studies offer insights You might think, given the format of this book (short fictional stories of modern women followed by short character studies of BIble women) that it's a light read or a shallow Bible study with no more depth than the latest novel. But in reality, Liz Curtis Higgs, the author, has studied these Bible women extensively, and her study is evident in the lessons found in this book. The fictional stories add a dimension to the women in the Bible that we thought we knew. The Bible studies offer insights and useful information about the times and cultures in which the women lived. She also asks probing questions that allow you to apply the lessons learned to your own life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn in FL

    I read this quite some time ago and remember thinking that it was a book for those without Biblical teachings. Something I would give to a new Christian or someone who hadn't been exposed to the teachings of the Bible but had heard of one of the women mentioned without any reference points to understand the woman's significance in the historical events. I have done a lot of study and have written similar accounts so maybe I am more than a tad biased. I think it is a good source of information and I read this quite some time ago and remember thinking that it was a book for those without Biblical teachings. Something I would give to a new Christian or someone who hadn't been exposed to the teachings of the Bible but had heard of one of the women mentioned without any reference points to understand the woman's significance in the historical events. I have done a lot of study and have written similar accounts so maybe I am more than a tad biased. I think it is a good source of information and fairly accurate. It is directed at the lay person and certainly not a scholarly work (nor does it claim to be). I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lorelei

    I was excited to read the book hoping that it passed along lessons of how being "bad" was okay because these girls from the bible were bad too. I had been taking a feminist biblical interpretation course and without reading the reviews for this book, expected it to continue along that same line of thinking. That we can consider the women of the bible in a sex-positive, pro-women, anti-shame way. Unfortunately the first chapter starts off with a stab to the heart. The author tells a fictional stor I was excited to read the book hoping that it passed along lessons of how being "bad" was okay because these girls from the bible were bad too. I had been taking a feminist biblical interpretation course and without reading the reviews for this book, expected it to continue along that same line of thinking. That we can consider the women of the bible in a sex-positive, pro-women, anti-shame way. Unfortunately the first chapter starts off with a stab to the heart. The author tells a fictional story of a girl who is abused and then, after noting that the story is her own, victim blames the girl for essentially choosing the wrong guy. Ouch. Each chapter starts with a soap opera retelling of a story from the bible. As someone who isn't super well read in the bible, I found this helpful. Granted, the stories are very lifetime-y as another reviewer noted. They too continue the theme of shame (women are bad because they choose to be bad not because their circumstances make them do things they don't want to do.) I also noted throughout the book a very odd reoccurrence of women putting other women down. Like - Oh, she was that typical pretty type, thin and beautiful, the ones all the men like, oh I'd never be like her. I was way smarter than that! That sort of thing. The language idealized this "perfect women" that the author seemed to create herself, and then immediately put that type of women down. Why why why? Whyyyyy? While the book does its duty in making a case for its beliefs, it does so in a way that is very oddly women-hating. You don't need a new book to tell us how horrible the women of the bible were. It does that pretty well itself. I was hoping for something very different. While there were some redeeming points to this book, I feel sore about it, and expect that they were not put there intentionally. I hope that the women who do read this book know that a mistakes, bad choices, and violations happen, and that it does not stain their character to experience life through living it. I also hope they realize that being bad by anothers standards does not necessarily make her less of a woman, in her own eyes. I'll keep looking for the book that reminds me why all the nameless women deserved to be named.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    I'm reading this with my friends and we're doing the study book too. So far...excellent. The way she re-writes the biblical stories into modern life situations (usually NOT a fan of this) is so helpful. I suddenly relate to all these 'bad' girls. A snake, an apple, not so tempting, but a smooth-talking guy, a kiss....yup. Understanding the wife of an Egyption official in the kings court, ordering around slaves, no, but the bored wife...again yup. I get it. And I'm learning how to see the signs ea I'm reading this with my friends and we're doing the study book too. So far...excellent. The way she re-writes the biblical stories into modern life situations (usually NOT a fan of this) is so helpful. I suddenly relate to all these 'bad' girls. A snake, an apple, not so tempting, but a smooth-talking guy, a kiss....yup. Understanding the wife of an Egyption official in the kings court, ordering around slaves, no, but the bored wife...again yup. I get it. And I'm learning how to see the signs early and get my eyes back to Jesus, so I don't fall in.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate T. Bug

    This book was really great and a definite must read for all Christian women. I love how Liz tells a modern story that is similar to the bible story before she discusses the events in the bible. It helped me relate to the women in the bible so that I can understand where they were coming from. It teaches Chrisian women that although we may have backslidden in the past that we are not defined by our misdeeds. Jesus loves us and has washed those sins away. In fact, those sins have made us better, s This book was really great and a definite must read for all Christian women. I love how Liz tells a modern story that is similar to the bible story before she discusses the events in the bible. It helped me relate to the women in the bible so that I can understand where they were coming from. It teaches Chrisian women that although we may have backslidden in the past that we are not defined by our misdeeds. Jesus loves us and has washed those sins away. In fact, those sins have made us better, stronger people. We can really appreciate God's love and be better witnesses since we too can understand that everyone is human and falters. God is a forgiving God. I will read Really Bad Girls now and Slightly Bad Girls as well. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mackey

    I spent twelve years in biblical study, another four years helping my errant ex-husband study for the seminary so I know thing or two about evangelical religious beliefs. When I got this book from my local library, I thought it was going to be similar to the book about "bad" princesses where the women are actually amazingly wonderful. Instead I got a pile of horse manure. These accounts are told from a MALE writer's perspective, namely the man called Paul. He vilified women in order to make the I spent twelve years in biblical study, another four years helping my errant ex-husband study for the seminary so I know thing or two about evangelical religious beliefs. When I got this book from my local library, I thought it was going to be similar to the book about "bad" princesses where the women are actually amazingly wonderful. Instead I got a pile of horse manure. These accounts are told from a MALE writer's perspective, namely the man called Paul. He vilified women in order to make the males in the bible seem more "holy" than they actually were. The entire concept of this book is misogynistic . Apparently one does not have to be male to slam women. No wonder we have so many problems as women when you have writers like this!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dru

    I'm barely 10 pages into this book and I can tell how painful of a read this is going to be, but I promised myself I'd get through it. To start off with, the author clearly states the *four* groups of readers she is targeting, and all four are WOMEN. So as a man, I already feel like the author has nothing to tell me, and doesn't WANT to speak to me. Also, the bible-thumping evangelical nature of the author is gross and irritating. I have no problem when people have a personal relationship with God I'm barely 10 pages into this book and I can tell how painful of a read this is going to be, but I promised myself I'd get through it. To start off with, the author clearly states the *four* groups of readers she is targeting, and all four are WOMEN. So as a man, I already feel like the author has nothing to tell me, and doesn't WANT to speak to me. Also, the bible-thumping evangelical nature of the author is gross and irritating. I have no problem when people have a personal relationship with God for the improvement of their lives or the lives of those around them. But to attach meaning between every event in ones life and some memorized bible verse is creepy. More later as I get through this thing... ============================================================ - And now that I'm done let me say how awful this book was. It's only redeeming quality was that I learned a few obscure bible stories. Here are the notes I jotted down to myself as I went through: - Presumptive of Potiphar without justification. - She says "You know the rest", at one point, implying that we all must have memorized the bible the way she has. This effectively loses me as I have no idea what point she's making. - Although she says " we can't know" she still frequently fills in her favorite theory, such as putting blame on Potiphar. She takes the interpreted scripture far too literally. - She both accepts and complains about her role as a wife. - Only goes to alternate translations when it suits her, otherwise latches onto a word as translated and makes hay with it - Hates Lot for offering up his daughters and questions God for finding good in him, but offers no explanation for how God can approve of Lot's actions. How can she make this a story about Lot's WIFE, when Lot is given a "pass" by God for offering his daughters up to gang rape?? - Offers 10 rational reasons why Lot's wife looked back, then dismisses them all, calls her disobedient, and labels her " bad" - Explains how the woman at the well lived in a time when a woman needed a man to survive, then calls her a fornicator and a bad girl - I am enjoying learning stories I either didn't know or only knew very sketchily - She says the bible lacks any mention of Delilah having a good personality, but (to me) that doesn't mean she didn't have one and was just a pretty face which she used to snare Samson, but the author decides (without any evidence) that lack of mention of a personality must mean she was pretty only - Why not some hate for Samson for not asking why Delilah tied him up three times already. The man is a moron! - No mention of the fact that Samson's hair was taken from him (not voluntarily given.) Yet she calls the crime against him a sin HE COMMITTED and blows past it. By her logic, a married woman, who promises to be faithful to her husband, but who is then raped is the one committing a sin! This author would make a FINE militant Islamist! - In the story of Sapphira and Ananias she blows past god killing two people for nothing more than a lie - With nothing but attitude and no evidence she dismisses the possibility that the two spies who visited Rahab partook of her 'services' - There is no evidence that Rahab's red cord was a harlot flag yet the author states it is - She believes a husband is "head of the household" - Blows right past king David having a man killed for lusting after his wife - Michal's only sin was not to worship God with David after he left her and got more wives. For this, and this ALONE, she is labeled "bad" - The sinful woman is called a prostitute with no evidence

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    if you dumbed the bible down much further it would come with a crayon. the narrative voice is annoying. liz higgs, i'm not your "girlfriend." if you dumbed the bible down much further it would come with a crayon. the narrative voice is annoying. liz higgs, i'm not your "girlfriend."

  11. 4 out of 5

    AlegnaB †

    I didn't like this book. I didn't like the writing style, which was flippant and not something I want in a Bible study book. I'm not the author's girlfriend, so I didn't like being addressed as that. So many of her comments were sarcastic and immature. It seemed like a teenager wrote this instead of a mature adult. I didn't care for the stories the author created to parallel the Bible stories. They sometimes did a poor job of it, and none of them added anything good or helpful to the book. The a I didn't like this book. I didn't like the writing style, which was flippant and not something I want in a Bible study book. I'm not the author's girlfriend, so I didn't like being addressed as that. So many of her comments were sarcastic and immature. It seemed like a teenager wrote this instead of a mature adult. I didn't care for the stories the author created to parallel the Bible stories. They sometimes did a poor job of it, and none of them added anything good or helpful to the book. The author sometimes jumped to conclusions and presented them as truth instead of her opinion -- e.g. "Lot, with his glib tongue and clever speech, was undoubtedly a storyteller, prone to exaggeration, which may explain why his sons-in-law thought Lot was pulling their legs." Was Noah a storyteller prone to exaggeration, since people didn't believe him? There was no meat to this book. Baby Christians possibly would be able to get some useful things out of it, but I doubt many mature Christians would.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I tried to stick with this... I really did. In fact, I made it to about page 200 before I gave up. I think there are definitely people this book will appeal to, but I guess I'm not one of them. The contemporary retellings of biblical stories seemed to be reaching a lot to make the connection between the two worlds. In addition, while the author says she used many different commentaries and did lots of research, it's pretty obvious she picked and chose which to use by picking sources that agreed I tried to stick with this... I really did. In fact, I made it to about page 200 before I gave up. I think there are definitely people this book will appeal to, but I guess I'm not one of them. The contemporary retellings of biblical stories seemed to be reaching a lot to make the connection between the two worlds. In addition, while the author says she used many different commentaries and did lots of research, it's pretty obvious she picked and chose which to use by picking sources that agreed with her preconceived ideas. If you're the typical evangelical Christian woman, this book will probably appeal to you. If you're a little... left of center, shall we say, it's probably not for you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Piepie

    I loved how Liz retold stories of "bad girls" to make them more contemporary and reader-friendly...for instance, Delilah became a hairdresser named "Lila." Rahab - or, "Rae" - had a heart that burned for God just as she yearned to have her family escape from a coming earthquake. The nameless woman who anointed Jesus' feet with oil became a woman named "Anita" who kissed the feet of a governor's son who had vile, open sores and was repulsed by almost everyone he came in contact with. These were b I loved how Liz retold stories of "bad girls" to make them more contemporary and reader-friendly...for instance, Delilah became a hairdresser named "Lila." Rahab - or, "Rae" - had a heart that burned for God just as she yearned to have her family escape from a coming earthquake. The nameless woman who anointed Jesus' feet with oil became a woman named "Anita" who kissed the feet of a governor's son who had vile, open sores and was repulsed by almost everyone he came in contact with. These were beautiful stories of a merciful and loving God who loves "Bad Girls" and "Good Girls" alike, and so many brilliant and shining truths poured from Liz's pen onto the page. I can't tell you how much I love her writing. This is an amazing book, perfect for evening devotions or a personal Bible study.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Narelle

    The first chapter is all about Eve. We are able to walk in Eve’s shoes in a modern day setting and experience her thoughts and feelings as we journey through her story. Later in the chapter we are given a personalised commentary of the Biblical story of Eve, including lessons we can learn. I gained new insights into each of the women who were brought to life in these chapters. The author explores their possible thoughts and emotions in a very real way. The chapters are easy to read and I enjoyed The first chapter is all about Eve. We are able to walk in Eve’s shoes in a modern day setting and experience her thoughts and feelings as we journey through her story. Later in the chapter we are given a personalised commentary of the Biblical story of Eve, including lessons we can learn. I gained new insights into each of the women who were brought to life in these chapters. The author explores their possible thoughts and emotions in a very real way. The chapters are easy to read and I enjoyed Liz’s light and humorous tone. I recommend this book to those looking to gain a deeper understanding of the Biblical stories of ‘bad girls’ like Eve.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I confess that I picked this book because the title was so intriguing. Higgs profiled ten women in the book and started each section with a modern fictionalized version of the highlighted bad girl. She then told the story of the Biblical bad girl and went over what we could learn from her. This book was a Bible study this summer at our church that I didn't do because of prior commitments, but if it were offered again, I would do it. There was a lot of good material covered and I learned somethin I confess that I picked this book because the title was so intriguing. Higgs profiled ten women in the book and started each section with a modern fictionalized version of the highlighted bad girl. She then told the story of the Biblical bad girl and went over what we could learn from her. This book was a Bible study this summer at our church that I didn't do because of prior commitments, but if it were offered again, I would do it. There was a lot of good material covered and I learned something from each section.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marylyn Eubank

    This book made me miserable. I suggested it to my bible study based on the title. I thought it would actually provide some contextual information about females in the bible. Wrong. It was basically a diatribe against female strength and independence.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    In Bad Girls of the Bible, Curtis Higgs makes the case that often the “bad girls” of the bible are easier to relate too than the good girls (such as Mary). She then presents different bad girls from both the Old and New Testaments. Each story is first told as a modern day story, then a discussion of the Biblical context, and then lessons that can be learned from each story. While the modern story sometimes allowed one to really understand the story in terms of today (such as Lot’s Wife and the S In Bad Girls of the Bible, Curtis Higgs makes the case that often the “bad girls” of the bible are easier to relate too than the good girls (such as Mary). She then presents different bad girls from both the Old and New Testaments. Each story is first told as a modern day story, then a discussion of the Biblical context, and then lessons that can be learned from each story. While the modern story sometimes allowed one to really understand the story in terms of today (such as Lot’s Wife and the Sinful Woman who washes Jesus’ feet with her hair), others fell flat (Eve and Saphhira). My favorite part was actually the discussion of the Biblical context. I thought each story had a very interesting discussion in biblical terms and made me think about some of these Bible stories in a new way. I did have problems with the characterization of some of these bad girls, especially Micah. Micah had a rough life as a pawn of King Saul and King David. I don’t know why she would be characterized as a “bad girl” for telling King David that she thought he shouldn’t be dancing in the streets and showing his jiggly bits. If I were her, I would probably have more words than that for him, especially a heart to heart about his treatment of women in general. The discussion for this part was that she should have honored her husband and not said anything. I think this is a bit of a stretch. You should honor your husband, but I think you should also have honest discussions and be able to tell him when you think he is being foolish. I would fully expect my husband to tell me I looked like a fool if I were dancing about town with my jiggly bits exposed! I think my favorite and most enlightening reading of the book was about Lot’s wife. I had always really thought before about it being a story of someone who did not follow God’s directions and was therefore turned into a pillar of salt. In this book, it talks more about the fact that perhaps Lot’s wife couldn’t let go her possessions and that we shouldn’t become so attached to things. It was a good discussion and gave me a lot to think about. Overall, it was a very interesting book. I think it would have been even more interesting to read it with a church group of ladies. It would be a great book to use for a women’s bible study and discussion.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    In her first book on “Bad Girls of the Bible,” Liz Curtis Higgs encourages her readers to take a new look at these women who had a problem with sin. It may have been for a moment, for a season, or they may have been “bad to the bone,” but each has something to teach us. As each chapter opens, Ms. Higgs gives us a real time story based on the life of the woman she is discussing before introducing us to her. Tying the past to the present, each story shows how Satan continues to tempt in the same m In her first book on “Bad Girls of the Bible,” Liz Curtis Higgs encourages her readers to take a new look at these women who had a problem with sin. It may have been for a moment, for a season, or they may have been “bad to the bone,” but each has something to teach us. As each chapter opens, Ms. Higgs gives us a real time story based on the life of the woman she is discussing before introducing us to her. Tying the past to the present, each story shows how Satan continues to tempt in the same manner year after year. Each chapter also offers us hope and steps for change, along with questions to ponder alone or in a group. Come take a new look at Eve, Potipher’s Wife, Lot’s Wife, the Woman at the Well, Delilah, Sapphira, Rahab, Jezebel, Michal, and the Sinful Woman. Come glean wisdom from their lives. I found this book to be full of wonderful suggestions on how to combat the devil; how to win the daily struggle with sin. It gave me new insights into the lives of these women, and how I can grow from studying them. I now want to read the rest of her books!

  19. 4 out of 5

    rené lauren

    At first I was excited for this book. I like complex characters and I like Scripture, so for those two to be presented together pleased me. Then I read the book and it was terrible. The author simplifies the stories of these women to the point that they lose their integrity. She villanizes the women, even in situations where it's not appropriate. She can't decide if the women are being used by their culture and fulfilling their duties as women in their cultural setting or if they were masters of t At first I was excited for this book. I like complex characters and I like Scripture, so for those two to be presented together pleased me. Then I read the book and it was terrible. The author simplifies the stories of these women to the point that they lose their integrity. She villanizes the women, even in situations where it's not appropriate. She can't decide if the women are being used by their culture and fulfilling their duties as women in their cultural setting or if they were masters of their own fate and fully responsible for what happened to them. (I saw this especially with the story of Michal and it was irritating.) The biggest issue I had though was that in her attempt to relate the stories to present day situations, she created mini-fictions at the start of each chapter that often missed the point of the Biblical story. Some of them were so far from what Scripture actually teaches, I was confused as to how a Christian publisher allowed this to be printed. Basically, it was exhausting.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Summer Lane

    Very good read! It's so nice to read stories about women in the Bible who were imperfect. Some of them received their justice in the end, while others realized the error of their ways and opened their hearts to God to receive forgiveness and life. I like the Liz Curtis really gives a voice to the inner commentary going on in my head while I read. For example, I've always thought David did some pretty dumb things (I mean, we're human so we ALL do dumb things), but I love how Liz points that out. Very good read! It's so nice to read stories about women in the Bible who were imperfect. Some of them received their justice in the end, while others realized the error of their ways and opened their hearts to God to receive forgiveness and life. I like the Liz Curtis really gives a voice to the inner commentary going on in my head while I read. For example, I've always thought David did some pretty dumb things (I mean, we're human so we ALL do dumb things), but I love how Liz points that out. Hey, David's not perfect. He screwed up AND he screwed OVER his first wife Michal. But she helps to explain the purpose behind every Bible story, and the mention of every woman in the Word who was, indeed, "bad." My favorite stories are the tales of Rahab the prostitute in Jericho and the weeping woman who cried on Jesus' feet. Lovely stories of forgiveness, and illustrations that Jesus offers His love freely to all who first have faith. Our relationship with Him is really the most important thing!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alana

    I remember hearing Liz Curtis Higgs speak years ago at some women's event, and really enjoyed her. She has a good sense of fun and wit, and with a "bad girl" past isn't quite so "goody goody" in her approach to the study of classic Bible stories. Her review of some of the more well-known "bad girls" of biblical fame isn't as deep as some, but it's fun, honest, and practical. She retells each story in a modern context and puts faces and stories to the names, making the characters sympathetic, som I remember hearing Liz Curtis Higgs speak years ago at some women's event, and really enjoyed her. She has a good sense of fun and wit, and with a "bad girl" past isn't quite so "goody goody" in her approach to the study of classic Bible stories. Her review of some of the more well-known "bad girls" of biblical fame isn't as deep as some, but it's fun, honest, and practical. She retells each story in a modern context and puts faces and stories to the names, making the characters sympathetic, someone to relate to, but also deeply personal. We get to the core of their choices, despite whatever circumstances in which they found themselves, and analyze the heart of their motives, and the consequences of their choices, both the good, and the bad. It's a thought-provoking, fun selection that would be good for a small or larger group study.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Liz Higgs took on the subject of Bad Girls in the Bible in an insightful way. She would introduce each woman with a fictional version of the Bible Story, put in today's time, then she would discuss the woman that the story referred to. Eve began as Evelyn who was to be engaged to Adam Mann. The fictional story helped the reader to relate to the character even more. She covered many women from Eve to Delilah to Jezebel and many more. Great book!!! Liz Higgs took on the subject of Bad Girls in the Bible in an insightful way. She would introduce each woman with a fictional version of the Bible Story, put in today's time, then she would discuss the woman that the story referred to. Eve began as Evelyn who was to be engaged to Adam Mann. The fictional story helped the reader to relate to the character even more. She covered many women from Eve to Delilah to Jezebel and many more. Great book!!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    It's a little cheesy and you can definitely tell that it's from the early 2000s, but overall it's a great read! It was amazing to learn the stories from these women's perspectives. And I learned that I can have the same struggles and sins these women had. It's a little cheesy and you can definitely tell that it's from the early 2000s, but overall it's a great read! It was amazing to learn the stories from these women's perspectives. And I learned that I can have the same struggles and sins these women had.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dorine

    Excited to read this one soon. I met the author and heard her speak this weekend. She's funny and keeps it real. Will cherish my signed copy. :) Excited to read this one soon. I met the author and heard her speak this weekend. She's funny and keeps it real. Will cherish my signed copy. :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Coumbe

    I was excited to read another Liz Curtis Higgs book. However, I am experiencing trouble in reviewing this book. I like some insights Liz has about bible characters: Potiphar’s Wife, Jezbel, Delilah, Lot’s Wife, the Sinful Woman and the Woman at the well, I learned more about Sapphira and Michah. I guess I saw them as minor female characters and they are not. I do have some concerns about this book. Yes Higgs admits that she is not a bible scholar and it does show in her writing. I find some of t I was excited to read another Liz Curtis Higgs book. However, I am experiencing trouble in reviewing this book. I like some insights Liz has about bible characters: Potiphar’s Wife, Jezbel, Delilah, Lot’s Wife, the Sinful Woman and the Woman at the well, I learned more about Sapphira and Michah. I guess I saw them as minor female characters and they are not. I do have some concerns about this book. Yes Higgs admits that she is not a bible scholar and it does show in her writing. I find some of the colloquial and casual language about the bible off-putting at times, such as the girlfriend references throughout the book. I do not find the introduction of each chapter with a fake and modern character similar to the biblical ones helpful, but confusing or distracting. I dislike Higgs categorizing each woman as Bad to the Bone, Bad for a Moment, and Bad for a Season but not forever. Liz is correct in her criticism of older (possibly male) scholars for blaming biblical women for everything that goes wrong, while exhorting men as heroes. Yet Higgs labeling of these biblical women is not much different than the scholars she abhors. As a reader I would prefer to decide for myself and not have the author make that judgment for me. Also, I disagree with Higgs portrayal of Eve as the first bad girl because Eve was innocent until she partook of the forbidden fruit so, she would not understand that getting into a debate with Satan was wrong or that Eve’s choice led her to make the choice to disobey God. I feel Eve did not stop listening to God or her husband. She did repent of her sin of disobedience. If Adam and Eve did not eat of the fruit of the knowledge of Good and Evil we and all our ancestors would not exist. In spite of my caveats of Bad Girls of the Bible, Higgs does provide biblical references and helpful insights at the end of each chapter. The author has a study guide in each chapter and discussion questions. Also the reader does not need to read the book in chronological order but can pick which biblical woman to study instead. Higgs does write in an engaging manner for the most part. I would recommend reading this book with a bible in hand. I am sure that there are woman’s bible study groups that may want to use this book and I suggest caution because this book would be better for personal study instead due to the nature of questions to consider for the reader may be too personal in nature. I received a complimentary copy of Bad Girls of the Bible from WaterBrook Publishers and am not required to give a positive review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kayce

    Talk about an entertaining read! Liz Curtis Higgs is a laugh out loud author. She will keep your interest on every single page of this book while you learn from other Bad Girls’ mistakes. Written without a “holier than thou” attitude, Higgs will be the first one to admit she is a former Bad Girl herself. But God’s grace is enough for anybody! At the beginning of each chapter, Higgs writes a fictional story similar to the biblical one. I thought this was a very creative way to get the reader into Talk about an entertaining read! Liz Curtis Higgs is a laugh out loud author. She will keep your interest on every single page of this book while you learn from other Bad Girls’ mistakes. Written without a “holier than thou” attitude, Higgs will be the first one to admit she is a former Bad Girl herself. But God’s grace is enough for anybody! At the beginning of each chapter, Higgs writes a fictional story similar to the biblical one. I thought this was a very creative way to get the reader into the story and imagine the characters, the settings, and the plot in more depth. However, I also believe that is a slippery slope and readers can potentially remember the fictional story more than what the Bible says. Despite the latter, I thought it was an entertaining stretch of the imagination for each woman featured. After the fictional piece, Higgs shares the Biblical account of featured Bad Girl, and then shares “What We Can Learn” portions as well as “Good Girl Thoughts to Consider.” Though Higgs is not a theologian, I think she shares valuable insight and interesting points to consider with each Bad Girl. For example, she shares ten possibilities of why Lot’s wife may have looked back when her family was fleeing their hometown. Higgs studied several different commentaries to create this book and I think her efforts more than paid off. There are definitely some thought provoking ideas in Bad Girls of the Bible. I have both Really Bad Girls of the Bible and Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible, both of which I still plan to read soon. I think it’s interesting to look at the Bad Girls for once, as it seems the Good Girls are usually the examples set before us. But what about those that have messed up royally, continue to do so, and then find themselves seeking forgiveness and redemption? Higgs is hysterical, creative, and reassuring in Bad Girls of the Bible and I look forward to reading more of her books! 4/5 stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    My Book Addiction and More MBA

    BAD GIRLS OF THE BIBLE AND WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM THEM by Liz Curtis Higgs is a Christian/Women/Bible Study. A humorous look at the Bad Girls of the Bible,Eve, Potiphar's Wife,Delilah,Lot's Wife,Michal,Sapphira,Jezebel,Woman at the Well, Rahab and the Sinful Woman. A powerful story of ten women,bad girls of the Bible are showcased with a bit of fiction added. We all have sinned and fell short. Each and every one of us,including these women. Some of the women of the Bible, had no names, or we nev BAD GIRLS OF THE BIBLE AND WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM THEM by Liz Curtis Higgs is a Christian/Women/Bible Study. A humorous look at the Bad Girls of the Bible,Eve, Potiphar's Wife,Delilah,Lot's Wife,Michal,Sapphira,Jezebel,Woman at the Well, Rahab and the Sinful Woman. A powerful story of ten women,bad girls of the Bible are showcased with a bit of fiction added. We all have sinned and fell short. Each and every one of us,including these women. Some of the women of the Bible, had no names, or we never hear of them, such the Women at the Well, the Sinful Woman,Lot's Wife, Potiphar's Wife, how humiliating that must have been, to be only called as whoever's wife,sister and such. Powerful and filled with humor,what not to love. A wonderful look into these women's lives, as well as a little fictional story included. There is even a bit about the author and her own trials and tribulations. Oh and a bible study is included. Once again, Ms. Higgs is a powerful storyteller,her characters,those we know and love,those who are fictional, and those we don't like so much are powerful,charming and realistic. If you would like a look at the tramps of the Bible, although, some are not tramps,pick up "Bad Girls of the Bible" you will be glad you did. I loved it! It is humorous,it is tearful,and you will find you have learned something of the Bible you didn't know or understand before. What a novel approach to a Bible Study! I would recommend it for anyone who loves to read humorous stories with a touch of fiction,a touch of truth and a great read. Received for an honest review from the publisher. RATING: 4.5 HEAT RATING: SWEET REVIEWED BY: AprilR, Review courtesy of My Book Addiction and More

  28. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

    SUMMARY: Ten of the Bible’s best-known femmes fatales parade across the pages of Bad Girls of the Bible with situations that sound oh-so-familiar. Eve had food issues. Potiphar’s Wife and Delilah had man trouble. Lot’s Wife and Michal couldn’t let go of the past, Sapphira couldn’t let go of money, and Jezebel couldn’t let go of anything. Yet the Woman at the Well had her thirst quenched at last, while Rahab and the Sinful Woman left their sordid histories behind. Let these Bad Girls show you why SUMMARY: Ten of the Bible’s best-known femmes fatales parade across the pages of Bad Girls of the Bible with situations that sound oh-so-familiar. Eve had food issues. Potiphar’s Wife and Delilah had man trouble. Lot’s Wife and Michal couldn’t let go of the past, Sapphira couldn’t let go of money, and Jezebel couldn’t let go of anything. Yet the Woman at the Well had her thirst quenched at last, while Rahab and the Sinful Woman left their sordid histories behind. Let these Bad Girls show you why studying the Bible has never been more fun! REVIEW: This book was used for a Women's Bible Study at our church. We had a good time with as Liz introduces each of these bad girls through a rolicking modern version before going through the biblical version and analyzing the bad girl's faults and how they found their way to God through Jesus. Having read some of the author's fictional writing, I could see her style in her witty modern versions which were very enjoyable. Her own personality definitely shown through in her analysis as well. I expect to enjoy her next book in this series Really Bad Girls of the Bible: More Lessons from Less-Than-Perfect-Women as well. FAVORITE QUOTES: "The goodness of your present life can't open the doors of heaven for you. The badness of your past life can't keep you out either. Not if you truly desire the forgiveness and freedom Christ offers." "It isn't circumstances that should determine our actions; it's a desire to please God above all things."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    After being impressed by my re-read of 'Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible', I was originally excited to read this. Too bad it begins with an entire chapter of victim blaming (of the author's own experiences, which hurts my heart) in which the first 'bad girl' is cast as such through being in an abusive relationship. The relationship itself is fairly outright contextualized as being the 'bad girls' fault for being promiscuous and being a general 'sinner'. This sends the message that a) it is the ab After being impressed by my re-read of 'Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible', I was originally excited to read this. Too bad it begins with an entire chapter of victim blaming (of the author's own experiences, which hurts my heart) in which the first 'bad girl' is cast as such through being in an abusive relationship. The relationship itself is fairly outright contextualized as being the 'bad girls' fault for being promiscuous and being a general 'sinner'. This sends the message that a) it is the abused's fault that the abuser is hurting her b) sinners deserve to be in abusive relationships and c) that good, God-fearing Christian women are not the ones who end up in abusive relationships. This is horrendous theology, this is atrocious advice, and this is NOT how God wishes us to envision ourselves in relationship to the evil committed against the most vulnerable of our communities. I was willing to overlook this (with the understanding that I would tell my future daughters not to read that chapter), but the Eve chapter doesn't start out any better. In the modern re-telling, Eve's sin is re-imagined as being that of the sin of sexual awakening- the understanding that kissing is good. This is also horrible theology and a disgrace to the beauty of sexual intimacy and the sexual element of the human body and experience that borders on fear-mongering and suppression. I'm not even going to finish reading this book- it is my hope that the other books of this series are more along the thoughtful lines of 'Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible'- as the idea of what consitutes as a 'bad' girl in this installment is woefully unhealthy and offbalance.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate Hyde

    This is a fantastic book that talks about women in the Bible who are portrayed as "bad girls" - think Eve (the first bad girl, who just had to take a bite of that darn fruit!), Potiphar's wife, Jezebel, etc. The author starts each chapter with a fictional story which is meant to illustrate, in a more modern and relatable fashion, each woman's sin. If you're familiar with the Bible, you'll probably catch on to who she's talking about before the end of each story. Then she goes on to break down th This is a fantastic book that talks about women in the Bible who are portrayed as "bad girls" - think Eve (the first bad girl, who just had to take a bite of that darn fruit!), Potiphar's wife, Jezebel, etc. The author starts each chapter with a fictional story which is meant to illustrate, in a more modern and relatable fashion, each woman's sin. If you're familiar with the Bible, you'll probably catch on to who she's talking about before the end of each story. Then she goes on to break down the Scripture references about the woman so we can better understand what the Bible really says about her. All in all, this book was completely eye-opening. In the beginning, the author says that whenever she read the Bible, she always thought that the "good girls" - Sarah, Mary mother of Jesus, the elusive Psalm 31 woman - seemed so unrelatable. But when it came to the bad girls, she recognized herself in them. I find that the same is true for me. All of these women sinned, yes, but that doesn't mean they're all bad women. Unfortunately, the Bible only gives us a glimpse of their lives, and the rest we can only imagine. Each chapter ends with a list of life lessons that we can learn from each individual woman, along with several questions - which would make this book great for a group study.

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