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The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel

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A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by a A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by artist Aya Morton. The iconic text has been artfully distilled by Fred Fordham, who also adapted the graphic novel edition of To Kill a Mockingbird. Blake Hazard, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter, contributes a personal introduction. This quintessential Jazz Age tale stands as the supreme achievement of Fitzgerald’s career and is a true classic of 20th-century literature. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy is exquisitely captured in this enchanting and unique edition.


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A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by a A gorgeously illustrated, first-ever graphic novel adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved American classic. First published in 1925, The Great Gatsby has been acclaimed by generations of readers and is now reimagined in stunning graphic novel form. Jay Gatsby, Nick Carraway, Daisy Buchanan, and the rest of the cast are captured in vivid and evocative illustrations by artist Aya Morton. The iconic text has been artfully distilled by Fred Fordham, who also adapted the graphic novel edition of To Kill a Mockingbird. Blake Hazard, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter, contributes a personal introduction. This quintessential Jazz Age tale stands as the supreme achievement of Fitzgerald’s career and is a true classic of 20th-century literature. The story of the mysteriously wealthy Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy is exquisitely captured in this enchanting and unique edition.

30 review for The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Reid

    I’ve made no secret that I’m a chronic Great Gatsby rereader. I have many different copies of it around my house, in multiple formats. This past month, my friends and I started a virtual book club where we read “Classics” (which we are defining very ambiguously). Our first read was Gatsby and I loved it all over again. But I also got to experience it in a completely different way. It's been turned into a graphic novel by Aya Morton and Fred Fordham. And it brings the entire story to life in such I’ve made no secret that I’m a chronic Great Gatsby rereader. I have many different copies of it around my house, in multiple formats. This past month, my friends and I started a virtual book club where we read “Classics” (which we are defining very ambiguously). Our first read was Gatsby and I loved it all over again. But I also got to experience it in a completely different way. It's been turned into a graphic novel by Aya Morton and Fred Fordham. And it brings the entire story to life in such vivid, quick-turning pages. The parties, the dresses, the mansions, the green light—all illustrated here beautifully. And it still packs the wallop that the original does!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5. "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy----they smashed Up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made------- I'm not a big graphic novel reader, in fact I've read so few I know this is only my fifth endeavor. I enjoyed it, the illustrations were gorgeous, soft pastels and I did get the feel of the time period. Of course, one doesn't get the depth of 3.5. "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy----they smashed Up things and creatures and then retreated back to their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together and let other people clean up the mess they had made------- I'm not a big graphic novel reader, in fact I've read so few I know this is only my fifth endeavor. I enjoyed it, the illustrations were gorgeous, soft pastels and I did get the feel of the time period. Of course, one doesn't get the depth of the novel, but this rendering did a good job of condensing the story but giving enough so one receives the bones of the story. I was afraid the emotion would be lacking,and while not as intense, it was still there. Think this was well done. May try another graphic of a classic, much better than the cliff notes that we had to waddle through. ARC from Scribner.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Olivia (Stories For Coffee)

    I always love seeing different renditions of The Great Gatsby, one of my favorite classic novels ever. I love revisiting the story and seeing how people interpret a story I’m so familiar with. This graphic novel was very similar to the 2013 adaptation in terms of aesthetic and the way the story is structured in a swift way that feels as though the story is full of jump-cute between scenes, moving quickly from one setting to the next. The art style is beautifully colored with pastels and has a qu I always love seeing different renditions of The Great Gatsby, one of my favorite classic novels ever. I love revisiting the story and seeing how people interpret a story I’m so familiar with. This graphic novel was very similar to the 2013 adaptation in terms of aesthetic and the way the story is structured in a swift way that feels as though the story is full of jump-cute between scenes, moving quickly from one setting to the next. The art style is beautifully colored with pastels and has a quintessential 20s art style that encompassed the mood of the story very well— although I do wish the characters’ facial expressions were more pronounced and there was more diversity in skin tones and facial structures because Tom, Gatsby, and Nick looked too similar to one another. I would say, if one hasn’t read The Great Gatsby, they wouldn’t get the full effect and appeal of the story from this graphic novel because it is choppy and sometimes the dialogue didn’t flow as well as it did as a full-fledged novel, but I enjoyed returning back to the storyline in a different medium because I am so familiar with it. There are pros and cons to this adaptation. I enjoyed it simply for the ability to see a favorite story of mine through another lens.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. After reading Beautiful Little Fools, a reimagining of "The Great Gatsby," I remembered that I had this beautiful graphic gathering dust. This would be a fine time to dust that off and give it a read, I thought. So I did. The artwork and feel of the graphic novel are beautifully done -- 5 stars to Aya Morton. I loved everything about the visuals from the texture of the cover to the panels inside. Reminiscent of the a So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. After reading Beautiful Little Fools, a reimagining of "The Great Gatsby," I remembered that I had this beautiful graphic gathering dust. This would be a fine time to dust that off and give it a read, I thought. So I did. The artwork and feel of the graphic novel are beautifully done -- 5 stars to Aya Morton. I loved everything about the visuals from the texture of the cover to the panels inside. Reminiscent of the artwork from that era and simply gorgeous. The adaptation of the classic text by Fred Fordham was a bit choppy. There were some instances when it seemed like the text and graphic panels were out of sync, so 3 stars for that piece. Overall, very much worth a read especially if you are a graphic novel fan.

  5. 5 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    6/7/20 Surprisingly, I feel rather indifferent to this one. The art fit the story perfectly and it held my attention long enough to finish the story. Now having seen the movie and read the graphic novel, I'm not too sure if I'd still be interested in reading the entire novel, but who knows? Perhaps if I try and read more of Fitzgerald's work. 5/7/20 Scribner was so kind to gift me a copy of the graphic novel :) I haven't read the novel, but I have watch the movie adaptation and read a chunk of lett 6/7/20 Surprisingly, I feel rather indifferent to this one. The art fit the story perfectly and it held my attention long enough to finish the story. Now having seen the movie and read the graphic novel, I'm not too sure if I'd still be interested in reading the entire novel, but who knows? Perhaps if I try and read more of Fitzgerald's work. 5/7/20 Scribner was so kind to gift me a copy of the graphic novel :) I haven't read the novel, but I have watch the movie adaptation and read a chunk of letters exchanged between Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda. You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website | The Storygraph

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Fred Fordham does a good job of distilling an American classic to the drawn page. I still would suggest reading the original first but this is a good followup for fans of the source material. Aya Morton's art has a look reminiscent of the 1920's. The pale colors and simple faces remind me of advertisements or movie posters of the time. Received a review copy from Scribner and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned. Fred Fordham does a good job of distilling an American classic to the drawn page. I still would suggest reading the original first but this is a good followup for fans of the source material. Aya Morton's art has a look reminiscent of the 1920's. The pale colors and simple faces remind me of advertisements or movie posters of the time. Received a review copy from Scribner and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    One of two comics adaptations of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby I just read after having re-read the original, which I love, and as I anticipate reading with a bunch of future English teachers in January 2022. So this is a good book, though it feels to me still like a kind of summary of the novel, retaining key lines, the text adapted by Fred Fordham, whose adaptation of another often required high school English text I liked a little bit more. But the language is the central strength of One of two comics adaptations of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby I just read after having re-read the original, which I love, and as I anticipate reading with a bunch of future English teachers in January 2022. So this is a good book, though it feels to me still like a kind of summary of the novel, retaining key lines, the text adapted by Fred Fordham, whose adaptation of another often required high school English text I liked a little bit more. But the language is the central strength of the book, not the plot, and much of that is of course missing. Still, this is good as one kind of visual companion to the original that would be useful to younger readers. I like the pastel coloring softening the digital art by Aya Morton, which otherwise felt a little abstract or coolly distant to me (I like very much her illustration work for Anne Opotowsky's His Dream of the Skyland). I miss here the (ironic) warmth here that Nick Carraway's narration provides for all these cold and selfish and self-destructive rich people.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    I just finished reading The Great Gatsby today. I also read Beautiful Little Fools and am reading The Chosen and the Beautiful. So, I’m definitely getting a feel for all Great Gatsby. This was the most disappointing. The story I thought was well done and did a good job bringing the book to life. The problem I had was the graphic artwork. I just thought it feel flat. The vivid pictures and the expressions of the characters, I thought were lacking. The characters I often had a hard time telling ap I just finished reading The Great Gatsby today. I also read Beautiful Little Fools and am reading The Chosen and the Beautiful. So, I’m definitely getting a feel for all Great Gatsby. This was the most disappointing. The story I thought was well done and did a good job bringing the book to life. The problem I had was the graphic artwork. I just thought it feel flat. The vivid pictures and the expressions of the characters, I thought were lacking. The characters I often had a hard time telling apart. So, this was not up to par for me. It didn’t capture the book too well. It was ok, but I think needed more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    Thank you so much to edelweiss and Simon & Schuster for received this beautiful and gorgeous Arc I'm so happy and blessed right now. This novel never gets old. The artist's illustrations were beautiful. If you are new to this story or if you already know everything about Gatsby, I recommend that you grab this beauty because i know I'll will. Thank you so much to edelweiss and Simon & Schuster for received this beautiful and gorgeous Arc I'm so happy and blessed right now. This novel never gets old. The artist's illustrations were beautiful. If you are new to this story or if you already know everything about Gatsby, I recommend that you grab this beauty because i know I'll will.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brogan Lane

    hmmmmm well, this didn't make me want to read The Great Gatsby - it made me glad that I hadn't read it if I'm being completely honest. I've never felt so bored reading a graphic novel until this one. The illustrations by Aya Morton were very unique and fit with the story being set during the 1920s, but other than that, I just really didn't like this. hmmmmm well, this didn't make me want to read The Great Gatsby - it made me glad that I hadn't read it if I'm being completely honest. I've never felt so bored reading a graphic novel until this one. The illustrations by Aya Morton were very unique and fit with the story being set during the 1920s, but other than that, I just really didn't like this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was very nice to see this great and famous American classic turned into a graphic novel. I appreciated how faithful this book was to the original material and also how some quotes of the book were actually included here. I expected a little more from the art, even though it was all drawn very nicely I would have preferred to see more vibrant colors instead of the ones that were chosen, but that The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was very nice to see this great and famous American classic turned into a graphic novel. I appreciated how faithful this book was to the original material and also how some quotes of the book were actually included here. I expected a little more from the art, even though it was all drawn very nicely I would have preferred to see more vibrant colors instead of the ones that were chosen, but that's just a personal preference.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    For those who like pictures with their stories, this retelling of the Great Gatsby will deftly bring readers into Gatsby's world. The characters and the feel of the time period come to life with beautiful illustrations and a compelling, well written story. Highly recommend this for classic and graphic novel lovers. – Jennifer K. For those who like pictures with their stories, this retelling of the Great Gatsby will deftly bring readers into Gatsby's world. The characters and the feel of the time period come to life with beautiful illustrations and a compelling, well written story. Highly recommend this for classic and graphic novel lovers. – Jennifer K.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

    I love THE GREAT GATSBY and when I saw Scribner was releasing this one on June 30th, I had to have it. I’ll get my preorder in here shortly, but until then all I have to say is that if you’re a lover of Gatsby you’re going to want this. The art style and coloring is so tasteful and beautiful. The attention to detail is incredible (minus the characters faces… don’t ask me what it is but I was not a fan of it.) Everything else, yes. What I really loved was how true to the original it was without b I love THE GREAT GATSBY and when I saw Scribner was releasing this one on June 30th, I had to have it. I’ll get my preorder in here shortly, but until then all I have to say is that if you’re a lover of Gatsby you’re going to want this. The art style and coloring is so tasteful and beautiful. The attention to detail is incredible (minus the characters faces… don’t ask me what it is but I was not a fan of it.) Everything else, yes. What I really loved was how true to the original it was without being an exact replica. Included within the new text are some of the original lines too and the lines chosen were perfect. They made my heart flutter and reignited my love for this novel. It’s by no means a replacement, but it held its own. I’ll be happy to have this gem on my shelf. I think the finished product will be even more stunning.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    As I've mentioned in previous reviews, I teach "The Great Gatsby" every year I teach juniors. I find the language rich, the story and setting engaging, and the themes/social commentary particularly useful in the classroom. The text can be challenging for a small group of students, so I've been dying to get my hands on a decent graphic novel version. And 2020 has blessed us with two! Where this graphic novel differs from others is its inclusion of a decent chunk of the text from the original novel As I've mentioned in previous reviews, I teach "The Great Gatsby" every year I teach juniors. I find the language rich, the story and setting engaging, and the themes/social commentary particularly useful in the classroom. The text can be challenging for a small group of students, so I've been dying to get my hands on a decent graphic novel version. And 2020 has blessed us with two! Where this graphic novel differs from others is its inclusion of a decent chunk of the text from the original novel. I was surprised to see what made the cut, and shocked to see not much didn't. This is particularly helpful in a classroom setting when teaching graphic novels; too often I find myself having to sacrifice too much of the original text to make it worthwhile teaching it in this format. I think this version balances what teachers (and lovers of the original text) need and want with the genre format well. Where this book didn't work for me was the art. With exception of a few beautiful splash pages, I found the art didn't intrigue me or enhance the story in any way. There were a lot of missed opportunities from the textual imagery to the visual imagery, and some missteps (eyes of T.J. Eckleberg were pretty bizarre). The character faces were flat (perhaps reflecting their characters, but I'm guessing not), and I couldn't stop seeing Daisy's character as an exact replica of Princess Di. I think this would work well for students who struggle with understanding the text of the novel form in a clear way. I can foresee many English teachers being happy with this compromise and willing to adapt it for their curriculum

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I'm not a fan of the original novel, but I thought I'd give this a go since it turned up at the local library. I shouldn't have bothered. Even in graphic novel format this book is filled with one of the most unlikable cast of characters I've come across. What a bunch of losers. Art, color palette, fonts -- none of them were particularly appealing either, though that could just be my mind souring on them due to their relation to this story. I'm not a fan of the original novel, but I thought I'd give this a go since it turned up at the local library. I shouldn't have bothered. Even in graphic novel format this book is filled with one of the most unlikable cast of characters I've come across. What a bunch of losers. Art, color palette, fonts -- none of them were particularly appealing either, though that could just be my mind souring on them due to their relation to this story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    oh yeah that's right - the public domain rights for Great Gatsby began January 1st of this year - so we should definitely expect more adaptations and mashups of this work to come. To me, the graphic novel adaptation of The Complete Don Quixote is the gold standard of literary to comics. This adaptation of The Great Gatsby felt to me like some totally fine art paired with some of the nicest sentences from the original book, but as a whole it didn't really do much for me. oh yeah that's right - the public domain rights for Great Gatsby began January 1st of this year - so we should definitely expect more adaptations and mashups of this work to come. To me, the graphic novel adaptation of The Complete Don Quixote is the gold standard of literary to comics. This adaptation of The Great Gatsby felt to me like some totally fine art paired with some of the nicest sentences from the original book, but as a whole it didn't really do much for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amélie Boucher

    This was a solid adaptation; however, I didn't love the art style. The Great Gatsby is a flamboyant and vibrant story of decadence, and yet the colors were muted, quite contrasting with the tone of the story. This was a solid adaptation; however, I didn't love the art style. The Great Gatsby is a flamboyant and vibrant story of decadence, and yet the colors were muted, quite contrasting with the tone of the story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    It's always so hard to rate adaptations like this. The curmudgeonly/snobbish side of me is irritated our culture has to constantly remake things when there is already a perfectly wonderful (well, usually wonderful. sometimes maybe just assumed to be wonderful) original version of a book or movie or song or whatever. The kinder, more creative, and probably more correct side of me is happy to accept any and all adaptions on an original because it opens something to a larger audience and gives autho It's always so hard to rate adaptations like this. The curmudgeonly/snobbish side of me is irritated our culture has to constantly remake things when there is already a perfectly wonderful (well, usually wonderful. sometimes maybe just assumed to be wonderful) original version of a book or movie or song or whatever. The kinder, more creative, and probably more correct side of me is happy to accept any and all adaptions on an original because it opens something to a larger audience and gives authors/artists a chance to put their own spin on it. After all, basically none of my fourth grade students are ready to read Anne of Green Gables without lots of assistance (maybe as like a bedtime story, which is how I first read it) but they all love Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel (and I do too). A small part of me is sad knowing many or even most of them may never take the time to step up to trying the chapter book. But a bigger part of me is happier that although time passes on and so much changes, her story still proves to be relevant and fun for young girls. Anyways. Gatsby. I don't really have strong feelings about Gatsby one way or the other. I read it in maybe my late teens or early 20s. Old enough to get at some of it, but still too young to fully get at what I thought and what it all meant. Now I get the meaning more behind it and have learned a lot more about the book/Fitzgerald, but never really had a strong feeling about the actual book when I read it. I never re-read it (keep meaning to). But I feel like in the years since, I have constantly read essays about it or seen it referenced somehow, or was watching the 2013 movie version (I love that version, I don't care what anyone says). I actually just watched the movie with Leo on New Year's Eve because it seems like the perfect NYE movie. Point being, when a story is that widely known and all the little details are saturated so deeply in your brain (the green light! the famous last line! the symbolism! etc) it's really hard to evaluate the story with a fresh eye and figure out if you actually like it or what it means to you personally (if anything). So. For what this was, I did enjoy it. The art was beautiful and it (seems) the author kept many of the most important and beautiful lines and phrases. I loved how they were incorporated into the art. I love that this will keep the story fresh and relevant for a whole group of readers who don't want to get to the actual book yet (and maybe never will). It's just very hard to rate because I still heard Tobey Maguire as Nick narrating the entire thing, and I saw many of the scenes exactly as I just saw them in the movie, almost as if they were taking the place of the pages. Not the author's fault, but can we have too much of one story or adaptation? Can it become pointless to keep redoing it?

  19. 5 out of 5

    aqilahreads

    oh no :(((( it was kinda all over the place & i dont quite understand what i just read. also its adapting one of the classics - so this can be hard to interpret in a graphic novel. as someone who have yet to read the original novel, i was really clueless on the storyline and not too sure if i would like the original novel too now. looks like its something that i wouldnt really enjoy heh

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    The artwork was stunning and didn’t overshadow the beauty of the language Fitzgerald has written. Staying true to the original novel, this graphic adaptation is extremely well done. The colors used were very muted which made it feel very classic and not too modern or comic book-esque.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate Crabtree

    3.5. It’s not perfect, but it’s a lovey rendition of The Great Gatsby and simplifies the plot quite nicely while including most of the memorable phrases we all remember from the novel. The artwork is stunning.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Scrima

    I just love The Great Gatsby so much! I loved being able to read it in this format. Ugh I just love this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Kraves Books

    I love when classic are adapted into graphic novels, and The Great Gatsby was no exception. The colour palette is what stood out to me- there was something dreamlike about it. I did enjoy the illustrations but have to agree with other reviewers when they say that it was difficult to tell the men apart. I do wonder whether I would have fully appreciated this if I hadn't already read the full novel. It is always fascinating to me to see what is included in a graphic novel like this one as well as I love when classic are adapted into graphic novels, and The Great Gatsby was no exception. The colour palette is what stood out to me- there was something dreamlike about it. I did enjoy the illustrations but have to agree with other reviewers when they say that it was difficult to tell the men apart. I do wonder whether I would have fully appreciated this if I hadn't already read the full novel. It is always fascinating to me to see what is included in a graphic novel like this one as well as what is left out!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    While The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was hardly my favorite book to read in high school English literature class. I enjoy the story for what it is as a portrait of American society. Tom and Daisy Buchanan are historically known for being snobs, Nick Carroway is pretentious, and Jordan Baker, Jay Gatsby, and Myrtle Wilson are pretenders. I’d say the one victim in the whole thing, besides the reader, is Mr. Wilson who represents an overwhelming majority of Americans in general. Because of While The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald was hardly my favorite book to read in high school English literature class. I enjoy the story for what it is as a portrait of American society. Tom and Daisy Buchanan are historically known for being snobs, Nick Carroway is pretentious, and Jordan Baker, Jay Gatsby, and Myrtle Wilson are pretenders. I’d say the one victim in the whole thing, besides the reader, is Mr. Wilson who represents an overwhelming majority of Americans in general. Because of this, I enjoy different renditions on The Great Gatsby and graphic novel versions of classics are always interesting because I get to visualize these works of literature beyond nearly falling asleep in class. Fred Fordham did an excellent job adapting this. As stated in the introduction by Fitzgerald’s great-granddaughter Blake Hazard, the biggest star of The Great Gatsby is the text. Aya Morton’s illustrations paint a nice picture of the iconic scenes in the original work like Gatsby’s parties, New York City, and the lazy days at the Buchanan household. I read the original book twice—once in high school literature class and another later in life to decide that this book is still full of snobbish aloofness that I cannot get behind. Still, reading this graphic novel allowed me to recall certain aspects of this book that I wouldn’t be able to recite at random. The story is familiar and the graphic novel format makes it refreshing. This book is 96 years old and we have seen different takes on the story in cinematic form and through nouveau riche character archetypes in American arts and culture. We can always expect extravagance but none of that adds anything new. Here, it was nice to see the characters in this format because it adds to the fact that this story is a bit fantastical. One of the enjoyable factors of this story has always been self-awareness. Fitzgerald knows that these characters are snobs in an almost cartoonish way, and so I like that this element was brought with the graphic format and this adaptation. Reading Challenge: Pop Culture Readathon: 80s films Challenge Prompt: “Duckie Dale” — Unrequited Love

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Huge fan of The Great Gatsby; even huger fan of Fred Fordham's previous graphic adaptation, To Kill a Mockingbird. Not so huge a fan of the two combined, unfortunately. One big knock against this Great Gatsby is that Fordham is off art duties. In his place, we have Aya Morton, who draws characters as washed-out mannequins. It's pretty at first and does fit the '20s setting, but after a while you really just want these characters to emote, damn it, and instead they're stuck in their bland poses. An Huge fan of The Great Gatsby; even huger fan of Fred Fordham's previous graphic adaptation, To Kill a Mockingbird. Not so huge a fan of the two combined, unfortunately. One big knock against this Great Gatsby is that Fordham is off art duties. In his place, we have Aya Morton, who draws characters as washed-out mannequins. It's pretty at first and does fit the '20s setting, but after a while you really just want these characters to emote, damn it, and instead they're stuck in their bland poses. Another knock: To Kill a Mockingbird (the novel) offers a simple, engaging story that's told with few rhetorical flourishes. That's not the case for The Great Gatsby (the novel), which is filled with beautiful, complex language that defies adaptation. When Fordham uses the exact text of the book, it feels out of place, like it floated in from another story. The main thrust of The Great Gatsby is still in the graphic adaptation, but all the nuance is lost. My recommendation: admire the gorgeous cover and then go read the prose novel.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Reed

    I think the artwork was beautiful and fit the story well. It’s been almost 8 years since I read The Great Gatsby so at times, I couldn’t remember the moments the graphic novel skipped around.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Thrilled to have finally opened this graphic novelization of one of my most-read books. Because it was different from the ways in which I have experienced this classic in the past, my attention was drawn to previously unnoticed aspects of the story and I was able to see it with new eyes and emotions. Highly recommend giving it a try!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hadia

    I liked it but didn't LOVE it 🤐 The art style was really cool, but I didn't like the face expressions of any of the characters which was huge bummer 😩 And of course it's almost impossible to do justice to Gatsby's story in this format. But points for trying! ✨ I liked it but didn't LOVE it 🤐 The art style was really cool, but I didn't like the face expressions of any of the characters which was huge bummer 😩 And of course it's almost impossible to do justice to Gatsby's story in this format. But points for trying! ✨

  29. 4 out of 5

    R.

    Uncanny Valley of Ashes There was something flat, uninspired about the otherwise prettily colored illustrations.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

    As a Gatsby fan, I always enjoy experiencing other renditions. However, this version felt very choppy, especially if you have no experience with the original text. I would not give this to students in isolation because of the choppiness. Nick, Gatsby, and Tom also look very similar in this version which could be hard for readers to distinguish. That being said, there are certain scenes/visuals in this rendition that would be great paired with the actual text.

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